281 posts tagged with pbs.
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Mephitis mephitis, the mefites' mustelid

The moment I realize I have skunks living in my yard, I become obsessed with them. Within a few weeks, I have the skunk skull on my desk, a stack of articles on skunks, and a copy of The Biology of the Striped Skunk, by B. J. Verts—the definitive textbook on the animal, published in 1967. (In fact, it’s the only textbook on the striped skunk.) I’m waiting for a bottle of skunk essence to arrive in the mail...
[more inside] posted by ChuraChura on Aug 31, 2016 - 31 comments

Postcards from the Great Divide

Postcards from the Great Divide: political stories from a divided America, is a nine part short film series from across the country telling stories of our politics and our culture. (Washington Post article on the series.)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jul 11, 2016 - 1 comment

The Story of India

The Story of India, written and presented by Michael Wood for the BBC, is a six episode documentary that serves as an entertaining and solid introduction to Indian history. All six episodes are available in full (6 hrs). [more inside]
posted by cwest on Jun 9, 2016 - 22 comments

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month

Time to celebrate Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America! You can start here, a joint venture by several agencies, and continue below the fold. [more inside]
posted by numaner on May 5, 2016 - 4 comments

Contact! Let's make contact!

"'Too many children think that scientists are all middle-aged white males in laboratory coats,' Edward Atkins, 3-2-1 Contact's director of content, told The New York Times in 1983." The Kids' Show That Taught Me to Ask "Why?", an ode to 3-2-1 Contact. [more inside]
posted by amnesia and magnets on May 3, 2016 - 41 comments

This feels too much like the late 80s/early 90s

Independent Lens documentary Wilhemina’s War [55m30s]: AIDS is one of the leading causes of death for black women in the rural South, where living with HIV is a grim reality. In Wilhemina’s War, Wilhemina Dixon, her daughter Toni, granddaughter Dayshal, and her 92 year-old mother, all the descendants of sharecroppers, live in South Carolina. Wilhemina cares for Dayshal, 19, who was born with HIV.
posted by hippybear on Mar 4, 2016 - 4 comments

Something New From This Old House

Starting on March 24, 2016, long-running historic house restoration public television show This Old House will begin a 10-episode arc with something completely new -- a brand new pre-constructed, energy-efficient house modeled after other Massachusetts North Shore houses from the late 1700s. A video preview of the project [2m5s]
posted by hippybear on Feb 19, 2016 - 39 comments

You can jail revolutionaries but you can't jail a revolution

The first feature-length documentary to shed light on the Black Panther Party — and all its reviled, adored, misunderstood, and mythologized history. The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution is now streaming online. [more inside]
posted by triggerfinger on Feb 17, 2016 - 23 comments

Maned Lionesses

This male-like lioness is defying gender norms (full episode) - "An African lioness that looks and acts male may be the secret to her pride's success."
posted by kliuless on Jan 23, 2016 - 10 comments

PAINTER STRIKES AGAIN

The Mad Painter was a sketch that first aired on Sesame Street in 1972. In the series, Our Protagonist (Paul Benedict, looking suspiciously like Greg Nog) decides he's going to paint a certain number, finds a surface on which to paint the numeral, paints said number, and then something funny happens. The Painter's co-stars included a young Stockard Channing, a bald mustachioed guy (Jerome Raphael), and a gorilla. Robert Dennis scores the pieces jauntily. Here they are, in numerical order: [ 2345678910*11 ] [more inside]
posted by not_on_display on Jan 13, 2016 - 46 comments

"The food is authentic in spirit."

"It was Asian enough for my immigrant parents and American enough for my sister and me." In the PBS feature documentary, Off The Menu, filmmaker Grace Lee traverses the US into the kitchens, factories, temples and farm of Asian Pacific America that explores how our relationship to food reflects our evolving communities. Food Republic spoke with Jonathan Wu and Wilson Tang, whose NYC restaurant, Fung Tu, is featured in the film.
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 31, 2015 - 4 comments

We settled in Astoria and it was here that I met Christopher Walken

Lidia Celebrates America: Home for the Holidays "This special features Lidia and six celebrity guests—Christopher Walken, Ann Curry, Padma Lakshmi, Rita Moreno, Marcus Samuelson and Carlo Ponti, Jr. as they share their immigrant experiences and holiday traditions."
posted by kliuless on Dec 24, 2015 - 1 comment

Whatever makes you happy, you put in your world.

"Painting is beside the point: the paintings in The Joy of Painting don’t matter." The joy of writing about The Joy Of Painting. In Which Bob Ross is Compared to God, Creator of Worlds. [more inside]
posted by triggerfinger on Dec 16, 2015 - 19 comments

Dr. Love Lectures About Christmas

Stories Of Christmas Love: Leo Buscaglia, USC's "Dr Love" and 80s PBS inspirational speaker talks for about 45 minutes about the meaning of the Christmas season from a compassionate, optimistic, humanist perspective with a focus on love. [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Dec 5, 2015 - 5 comments

Do It A Capella

In 1990 PBS Great Performances broadcast Do it A Capella, a Spike Lee - produced special featuring "some of the finest rock/popular/doo-wop groups in the world. . . a watershed event bringing the renaissance of a cappella to the public consciousness." [more inside]
posted by Herodios on Dec 4, 2015 - 14 comments

The underlying message of the Neighborhood

"I can still hear him signing off his show similar to the way he concluded his letter to Amy Melder: “You’ve made this day a special day by just your being you. There is no person in the whole world like you, and I like you just the way you are.” Some have suggested that this message sought to instill children with a sense of self-importance, but to believe that is to fundamentally misunderstand Fred Rogers. At the core of Rogers’ mission was the paradoxical Christian belief that the way to gain one’s life is to give it away." (SL Atlantic)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Nov 23, 2015 - 36 comments

Not without my floured hands at the wheel.

Christopher Kimball, the 'kitchen stickler' behind the beloved Cook's Illustrated magazine and PBS' highly-rated America's Test Kitchen show, is leaving the kitchen amidst a leadership shakeup at the company he founded. The last letter from Vermont has not yet been published. Previously
posted by anastasiav on Nov 17, 2015 - 152 comments

Terror in Little Saigon

The journalists were assassinated on American soil, one after another. [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Nov 4, 2015 - 5 comments

Livestreaming Happy Trees

Twitch, the social media platform for video games, just launched ‘Twitch Creative': a section of the site dedicated to non-gaming videos from artists. There you'll find people creating paintings or illustrations, composing songs, designing costumes, and even glass blowing. To celebrate, Twitch is holding an 8-day marathon livestream of every single Bob Ross The Joy of Painting episode.
posted by zarq on Oct 30, 2015 - 44 comments

New Evidence Strengthens Link Between Football and Brain Trauma

PBS's Frontline reports that a new study of the brains of deceased NFL players shows that 87 of 91 brains, 96%, had signs of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. The condition, caused by repeated head trauma, has been discovered in 79% of the 165 NFL athletes studied to date. These new findings are released just as the NFL gets its 2015-16 season underway and weeks before the release of the new Will Smith film Concussion, about the neurologist who first discovered the degenerative brain disease in a deceased NFL player's brain ten years ago. [more inside]
posted by briank on Sep 18, 2015 - 108 comments

American Experience

Walt Disney - "An unprecedented look at the life and legacy of one of America's most enduring and influential storytellers -- Walt Disney."
posted by kliuless on Sep 16, 2015 - 17 comments

I Could Do That

"So you look at a work of art and think to yourself, I could have done that. And maybe you really could have, but the issue here is more complex than that -- why didn't you? Why did the artist? And why does it have an audience?"
A primer from PBS Digital Studios, addressing common questions about modern art. (YT, 5:40)
posted by Countess Elena on Aug 30, 2015 - 33 comments

The letters of the day on “Sesame Street” are H, B and O.

This morning, Sesame Street announced that the new season, which begins next month, will air on HBO. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 13, 2015 - 127 comments

“I've been a boy for three years and I was a girl for six.”

Esteemed PBS series Frontline has produced a new documentary profiling a number of trans children and their families in the U.S. today: Growing Up Trans. There will be a Google Hangout with the producers and several of the film's subjects on July 1, at 3 PM EST. Inside, please find a number of articles released by Frontline to flesh out the film. [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Jul 1, 2015 - 35 comments

"We don't make mistakes, we just have happy accidents."

In the 80's and 90's, Robert Norman "Bob" Ross gave us The Joy of Painting. In each minimalist, 30-minute show, he would create an imaginary landscape using a wet-on-wet (or alla prima) oil painting technique while gently teaching viewers his methods. His signature, soothing comments described the "happy little clouds," "almighty mountains" and "happy little trees" that he was creating with his brush. Of the 31 seasons and 403 episodes that aired on PBS, the Internet Archive currently has the first 19 seasons (247 episodes) available for stream and download. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 31, 2015 - 71 comments

Where the rubber meets the road

Firestone operates one of the largest rubber plants in the world in Liberia. Firestone Liberia received a lot of positive press in the past few months after "stopping Ebola in its tracks" on its plantation in the country. But 22 years ago, Firestone Liberia played a different role in shaping Liberia's trajectory.
posted by ChuraChura on Nov 22, 2014 - 5 comments

Information Superhighway? That sounds like Super hype to me!

Andy Baio has created a YouTube channel of early internet informational videos: The VHS-Era Internet (1984-1995)
posted by The Whelk on Nov 17, 2014 - 15 comments

“To navigate, you must be brave and you must remember.” - Mau Piailug

... imagine for a moment that you didn’t have to rely on maps to navigate the unknown—that your memory, instincts, and knowledge of the environment sufficed. This is the art of Polynesian wayfinding. An article by Lily Bui, a researcher at MIT's Comparative Media Studies program, summarizing how Polynesians managed to reliably navigate between more than a thousand islands in 10 million square miles of water, an area slightly larger than the size of Canada, with limited instruments and great memories for details. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 16, 2014 - 6 comments

Totally Freaking Out About Peg + Cat

Peg + Cat is an Emmy award-winning cartoon from PBS, featuring the adventures of a young girl and her feline friend, using the power of math to solve Really Big Problems. The show, created by kid TV and Broadway veterans Jen Oxley & Billy Aronson, not only gives preschoolers an introduction to practical mathematics, it's also surprisingly entertaining for adults.
posted by murphy slaw on Sep 24, 2014 - 38 comments

"Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far."

Ken Burns’ new film The Roosevelts is 14 hours long. Which hours should you watch? [vox.com]
Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns's latest PBS opus, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History. If you'd rather stream, the entirety of the miniseries will be available on PBS.com, PBS member sites, and various PBS digital platforms. (It leaves streaming Friday, Sept. 26, so hurry.) It will also be rerun frequently on PBS and comes out on DVD/BLURAY Tuesday. So that's a whole host of ways to watch. But should you? This sucker, like many of Burns's most famous films, including The Civil War, Baseball, and The War, is really, really long. It's seven installments, of roughly two hours each, so you'll be devoting around 14 hours of your life to this thing. If you really, really like the Roosevelts, that's great, because this is a terrific screen biography of the famous family. But what if you're more Roosevelt-curious?
posted by Fizz on Sep 16, 2014 - 38 comments

By hook or by crook, we will.

A man wearing a dark blazer with white braiding steps out from behind what looks to be a giant white balloon. A penny-farthing sits in the foreground. Cheerily, he addresses the camera: "Hi, I'm Scott Apel, video critic for the San Jose Mercury News, and I'm here to welcome you again to The Prisoner, one of the most intriguing and most talked about television series ever made..." (YT) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 7, 2014 - 27 comments

"Welcome to a show about things you can see..."

Produced by Kansas City PBS affiliate KCPT, Rare Visions & Roadside Revelations is a TV series spotlighting "outsider artists, grassroots art environments and offbeat attractions of all kinds." [more inside]
posted by Nat "King" Cole Porter Wagoner on Jul 5, 2014 - 6 comments

You know, for kids!

Not everyone agrees on the best methods for raising kids. That becomes apparent when you examine the results from the 2010-2014 World Values Survey — 82,000 adults across 54 countries were surveyed to gain a better understanding of what they consider most important when raising a child, whether or not they were parents themselves. PBS NewsHour has an interactive quiz you can take to show which country has values closest to yours as well as a widget to compare the values of any two countries. You can see all the data in this google docs spreadsheet.
posted by Room 641-A on May 16, 2014 - 91 comments

Famous Names, Lost Interviews

blankonblank.org takes unheard interviews with famous musicians, innovators, authors, Hollywood stars and cultural icons and animates them. Interviews include everyone from Johnny Cash to Carol Burnett, Tupac Shakur to Farrah Fawcett, and Tim Gunn to Al Jaffee. blankonblank.org previously and previously. (Most interviews are ~5 minutes long.)
posted by Room 641-A on Apr 21, 2014 - 9 comments

Notre professeur à pris sa retraite.

Dr. Pierre Capretz, who taught French at Yale University for several decades, passed away at the age of 89 on April 1st of this year, qu'il repose en paix. Capretz is best known for his 1987 PBS series of half-hour French-language lessons, French in Action, which combined language immersion using to a simple romantic-comedy narrative followed by a classroom-style review, featuring Professeur Capretz, of the narrative with emphasis on the concepts, vocabulary, and grammar. [more inside]
posted by Sunburnt on Apr 10, 2014 - 22 comments

Bears, wolves and panthers, oh my: the return of predators to the US

Removing predators from the wild has thrown ecosystems off-kilter, triggering domino effects that scientists are just beginning to understand. In "Wild Predator Invasion," NOVA follows scientists who are trying a simple but controversial solution: returning apex predators—like wolves, bears, and panthers—to their natural environments. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 8, 2014 - 47 comments

Deeedlydeedlydeedly... BUM, DUM-DUM, PUH-PUUUMM

Five minutes of the 70s PBS Logo spun 63 progressively weirder ways and pitch-shifted. Trance-inducing.
1:45 of the infamous Viacom 'V of Doom'. [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Apr 5, 2014 - 31 comments

NIN ACL

As Austin City Limits gets ready for a rare television appearance by Nine Inch Nails this coming weekend (check your local PBS listings), the audience can prepare with an interview with Trent Reznor about the reëmergeance of NIN, or with a preview of the ACL performance with this clip of Satellite, from the most recent NIN album. [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Apr 3, 2014 - 35 comments

Kerouac, Cobain and the photos that define ‘American Cool’

In the face of racism, the great African-American jazz saxophonist Lester Young was “cool.” Credited with bringing the word into the modern American vernacular, “I’m cool” wasn’t Young’s reference to the sunglasses he wore day and night on stage, or the saxophone slung across his shoulder. It was his response to a divided society, a way of saying that he was still in control...
posted by jim in austin on Mar 21, 2014 - 69 comments

From the Merchants of Cool to Generation Like

'The media is a chaotic place. Like an ocean or a weather system, it no longer respects authority. In fact, those who attempt to impose their authority are ridiculed, while brilliant and valuable tidbits emerge from the most remote and seemingly inconsequential sources.... Younger, media-savvy viewers instinctively reject authoritative voices and laugh at commercials in which people try to act "cool." ' That was Douglas Rushkoff's assessment of companies courting the youth demographic as covered in print in 2000, and the next year in video as the PBS Frontline documentary, Merchants of Cool (streaming documentary; prev: 1, 2, 3, 4). Earlier this year, Rushkoff revisited the topic with PBS in Generation Like (streaming documentary), in a time when young people are generally happy to tell the world what brands they like as a way of identifying who they are. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 20, 2014 - 44 comments

They endured.

The Men of Atalissa
PBS's POV collaborates with the New York Times on a 35-minute documentary about the intellectually disabled men exploited for thirty-five years by Henry's Turkey Service in Atalissa, Iowa. (The documentary at the NYT or embedded in a Q&A with the journalists at PBS's POV.) [more inside]
posted by Ivan Fyodorovich on Mar 8, 2014 - 11 comments

Poetry Everywhere

Poetry Everywhere, produced by WGBH, in cooperation with the Poetry Foundation, presents videos of poetry being read, often by the author. And, if you want to introduce a child to poetry, don't miss the animated films made by students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. (there even seems to be one written and animated especially for MetaFilter, Spacebar)
posted by HuronBob on Mar 8, 2014 - 2 comments

American Promise

American Promise is a PBS documentary (live streaming through March 6) that follows two middle class African-American boys, Idris and Seun, who enter The Dalton School as young children, and follows them for 13 years. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 16, 2014 - 14 comments

Payola at PBS

The Wolf of Sesame Street. What do you get when you blend together a billionaire former Enron trader, a conservative vendetta against public pensions, and $3.5 million dollars? Corruption at the heart of public broadcasting. PBS is allowing corporate sponsors to dictate the content of its news programming, and failing to disclose that conflict of interest to its viewers, Pando Daily's David Sirota alleges.
posted by Diablevert on Feb 12, 2014 - 62 comments

When things get too heavy, just call me helium.

[SLYT] PBS Digital Studios has fancied up Jimi Hendrix's final interview with some whimsical animation.
posted by wabbittwax on Feb 5, 2014 - 6 comments

Hundreds and hundreds of big brown eyes

Here is a song about cows by Sadie & The Hotheads, a band fronted by actress Elizabeth McGovern, who is best known as Lady Cora on Downton Abbey (previously). [more inside]
posted by mudpuppie on Jan 24, 2014 - 64 comments

Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did

This will be a very short diary. It will not contain any links or any scholarly references. It is about a very narrow topic, from a very personal, subjective perspective. The topic at hand is what Martin Luther King actually did, what it was that he actually accomplished. The reason I'm posting this is because there were dueling diaries over the weekend about Dr. King's legacy, and there is a diary up now ... entitled, "Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Dream Not Yet Realized." I'm sure the diarist means well as did the others. But what most people who reference Dr. King seem not to know is how Dr. King actually changed the subjective experience of life in the United States for African Americans. And yeah, I said for African Americans, not for Americans, because his main impact was his effect on the lives of African Americans, not on Americans in general. His main impact was not to make white people nicer or fairer. That's why some of us who are African Americans get a bit possessive about his legacy. Dr. Martin Luther King's legacy, despite what our civil religion tells us, is not color blind. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Jan 20, 2014 - 99 comments

"Abysmally poor judges of their true incapacitation from sleep loss"

Taming the Hidden Drowsiness Epidemic
posted by IvoShandor on Dec 3, 2013 - 31 comments

Also, Peeta is played by a pita.

Following Homelamb (previously), Far From Seven and Sons of Poetry in the category of "Things I Never Thought I'd See On Sesame Street," I give you The Hungry Games: Catching Fur. Note: free of children killing other children.
Previously. Full list of Sesame Street spoofs and parodies. [more inside]
posted by Madamina on Nov 18, 2013 - 24 comments

Thru Tokyo

Thru Tokyo Kutiman (previously) has a new video featuring the sights and sounds of Tokyo.
posted by juv3nal on Oct 27, 2013 - 8 comments

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