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just a little folk music for y'all

December 4th, 1928, in a New Orleans park: two boys dance while another plays a homemade drum kit.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jan 13, 2014 - 22 comments

Coolest Music in the World

Siberian Ice Drumming. 'I felt like we were playing on the drums that Nature has left out for us, alone under the sun on the frozen waters of the world's most magnificent lake.'
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Dec 2, 2013 - 4 comments

Pen Ultimate

In an idle moment, you've probably drummed on a desk with your pen. But chances are middle schoolers could show you some skills. Masters like Shane Bang and many less well-known practitioners are pushing the old idea of pen-as-drumstick - Pen Beats, aka Pen Tap - to new heights. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Jul 11, 2013 - 18 comments

Keepintime: documentaries and collaborations between drummers and DJs

Keepintime started as a simple idea, to bring some of the most revered and notable L.A. session drummers together for a photo shoot, then have them talk about the recordings that were famous to hip-hop DJs and producers, with some top LA beat jugglers. From that effort in 2002 came the short film, Keepintime: Talking Drums and Whispering Vinyl (2 parts on YouTube). The short documentary toured around, and in 2002, along with the screening, some of the drummers and DJs put on a live improvised show in Los Angeles. From that 2 hour show, a 45 minute film was made: Keepintime - A Live Recording. Later that year, after screening the short film in England, the Keepintime crew were invited to Brasil, to team up with Brasilian percussionists of renown, and make a beat record. They also put on an epic live show. That whole enterprise was made into an almost two-hour long documentary, Brasilintime. More information on the artists inside. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 20, 2013 - 5 comments

ne plus ultra precision

Top Secret Drum Corps performing at the Edinburgh Military Tattoo 2012. The 25 Swiss drummers and colorguard members were one of the first non-military, non-British Commonwealth acts to perform on the Esplanade at Edinburgh Castle in 2003 and have made several reappearances. Drummers World features more videos, photos and information. (via Miss Cellania)
posted by madamjujujive on Mar 5, 2013 - 18 comments

Chilled beats

Ice Music - ethereal, Nordic ambient created with percussion instruments made out of ice
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Feb 20, 2013 - 5 comments

ice, ice, baby.

Lake BAIKAL ICE live sound. Unbeliveable! Real video from IRKUTSK ethnik percussion group «ETHNOBEAT». We playing on frozen water with pleasure and delight in the soul:)
posted by flapjax at midnite on Oct 5, 2012 - 18 comments

Marimba...

"December" for marimba by Daniel Berg. More Daniel Berg: Over the Moon, [more inside]
posted by Namlit on Aug 31, 2012 - 3 comments

The Audition

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the handful of orchestras for which musicians the world over will drop everything to scramble for a job, and the audition ranks among the world’s toughest job interviews. Mike Tetreault has spent an entire year preparing obsessively for this moment. He's put in 20-hour workdays, practiced endlessly and shut down his personal  life. Now the percussionist has 10 minutes to impress a selection committee and stand out among a lineup of other world-class musicians. A single mistake and it's over.  A flawless performance and he could join one of the world's most renowned and financially well-endowed orchestras at a salary of more than $100,000 a year. The Audition. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 5, 2012 - 90 comments

clever clave

“If anyone can move Afro-Cuban music into greater visibility, it’s [Pedrito] Martinez.” [more inside]
posted by LeLiLo on May 7, 2012 - 8 comments

Beyond Digital: bringing some of Morocco's off-line culture to the online world at large

Beyond Digital is a collaborative project between eight members who have come together to explore the culture and music of Morocco, which is often poorly represented online to the world at large, thus "beyond digital." The team put together a 9 minute "behind-the-scenes" look at their work, or you skip the preview and jump into their YouTube channel, articles on The Fader, and more on their website. Highlights: a collection of Moroccan percussion loops, a photo essay on Morocco's changing culture, and a collaboration between Moroccan musician Hassan Wargui (Imanaren) and Nettle, a "band project" by DJ/rupture. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 5, 2011 - 2 comments

a new meaning for the term 'drum head'

Can the human head itself function as a percussion instrument? Why, yes! Yes it can!
posted by flapjax at midnite on Oct 26, 2011 - 22 comments

Marlon Brando's Lost Musical Innovation

Marlon Brando. Yeah, sure, he could act. Very talented guy. But, hey, he also invented a radically innovative tuning system for conga drums. Played the congas, too. Yup. That's right.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 3, 2011 - 23 comments

buckets and sticks gonna do the trick

Chicago street drummers.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jan 24, 2011 - 28 comments

Some memories of Brother Bones

Freeman Davis, better known as Brother Bones, was a whistler and player of the bones. As his story goes, he started in Montgomery, Alabama, hearing his mother whistle. He made his way to Long Beach, California, where he was a shoe-shining entertainer called Whistling Sam. Somewhere along the way, he gained popularity with the bones as Brother Bones, leading a group called Brother Bones and His Shadows, as heard here in Rosetta and Listen To The Mockingbird. Their 1948 instrumental version of the 1920s jazz standard Sweet Georgia Brown was chosen as the theme song for the Harlem Globetrotters. Brother Bones was also featured in the blackface minstrel show movie, Yes Sir, Mr. Bones. Freeman Davis died in 1970, and in 2002 he was paid tribute at the Rhythm Bones Society's Bones Fest 6, honoring the 100th anniversary of his birth. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 8, 2010 - 6 comments

"I soon learned that if I was asked to play something over again, it meant that they didn't understand it, not that they liked it."

"But this wasn't quite enough and so then I got the idea of having all thirteen of the lowest tones of the piano played together... In other words, I was inventing a new musical sound later to be called 'tone clusters'... Anyway, this was my professional debut as a composer." Henry Cowell's musical autobiography. Cowell was one of the most important figures in 20th-century American music, described by John Cage as "the open sesame for new music in America." In this hour-long program recorded four years before his death in 1965, compositions from every stage in Cowell's career are contextualized and discussed by the man himself.
posted by No-sword on Aug 8, 2010 - 10 comments

sometimes humans are wonderful

Imitating a xylophone.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 29, 2010 - 28 comments

Puncture Kit: A bike that's a drum kit.

"Puncture Kit was brought to life after sitting in London's Green Park with my new bicycle not long after arriving from Australia in June 2008... no car, no drums, and a need to create beats. With my bike turned upside down, a sketchbook and no desire to be tubing a drum kit around underground, I started dreaming of ways to use my bike as my transport and drum kit ."
[more inside]
posted by SyntacticSugar on Jun 24, 2010 - 9 comments

Warren "Baby" Dodds, father of American drumming

Back in the 1920s, when Warren "Baby" Dodds was busy inventing jazz drumming in the company of pioneers like King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton and Louis Armstrong, to "give the drummer some" usually never meant more than a couple of bars fill every now and again. Fortunately, though, come 1946, when Dodds was already an older man but still in fine playing form, someone had the wherewithal to record this seminal percussion stylist in a series of extended drum solos, displaying his exuberant rhythmic stylings as well as his lending of superbly playful swing to the the rudiments. But let's jump back to the 20's again, and hear drummer Dodds, with the aforementioned King Oliver, take what's gotta be the killingest slide whistle solo in all of jazz history. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Mar 22, 2010 - 11 comments

Lyrics of Fury

Two pens for sticks, table for a drum, listen to Lyric bang out Let the Beat Ride. [via] [more inside]
posted by cashman on Aug 24, 2009 - 13 comments

stamping tube music of the Solomon Islands

Better than Radiohead.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Aug 16, 2009 - 114 comments

Oh Say Can You See The Way I Play "In C"?

Terry Riley celebrates the 45th anniversary of his groundbreaking composition, In C. A major work in the history of minimalist music, In C has an incredibly flexible score and performance guidelines, which have inspired many musicians to make their own versions, including a French guitar quintet, a traditional Chinese orchestra, a keyboard ensemble, an all-synthesizer group, CalArts Music students, French-Canadian hippies, a Danish vocal and percussion ensemble, another percussion ensemble, Japanese acidheads, a "laptop orchestra", the Bang on a Can Orchestra, and a rock "orchestration" by the Styrenes. No two versions can sound exactly the same, but it's still an open question how they will compare to the performance of In C at its Carnegie Hall debut next month. No recording of the original 1964 performance has ever been publicly released, but some eyewitness accounts can be found here.
posted by jonp72 on Mar 4, 2009 - 40 comments

Evelyn Glennie talks about music and deafness

Evelyn Glennie speaks at TED. Don't know her? Visit her site.
posted by aisforal on Dec 19, 2008 - 14 comments

P'ansori: Korea's National Cultural Intangible Treasure

Pansori (aka P'ansori) is a genre of Korean folk music produced by travelling musicians, a singer accompanied by a lone drummer. Rooted in seventeenth century folk tales, by the 1960's, Pansori was in danger of dying out completely, when the director Im Kwon-taek made the film Sopyonje. [more inside]
posted by PeterMcDermott on Jul 3, 2008 - 6 comments

Edgard, Iannis and György.

Edgard Varèse : Ionisation. Iannis Xenakis : Rebonds. György Ligeti : Artikulation and Poème Symphonique For 100 Metronomes. [NOTE: see hoverovers for link descriptions] [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 28, 2008 - 46 comments

Clapping Music

Counting in groups of 12 the first performer claps on 1,2,3,5,6,8,10 and 11. The second performer starts by clapping the same pattern but gradually shifts the pattern one step to the right. You are playing Steve Reich's clapping music. If you are serious you will want to study the score - and perhaps a watch a performance). If you are happen to be Evelyn Glennie you can have a go at both parts at once. - those slightly less more mortal are likely to end up like this. [more inside]
posted by rongorongo on Jan 14, 2008 - 25 comments

Assaf Seewi

Assaf Seewi has rhythm.
posted by phrontist on May 6, 2007 - 39 comments

Black Fire Percussion

Brooklyn's Black Fire Percussion: bringing high school marching band drumming to a whole other level of funky expression. [All links YouTube]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Mar 16, 2007 - 40 comments

Le beatbox royale.

Beatboxing in France? Who knew? (warning: lots of YouTube coming up.) The Art of Noise had their Beat Box (and live) . It's all good and well but maybe this beatbox is just a bit more interesting. There's even a very well documented history behind it. The Fat Boys did it, Slick Rick and Doug E. Fresh did it and we've already seen Super Mario Beatboxed with a flute. Roxorloops takes another turn. And even more French beatboxing.
posted by horseblind on Mar 13, 2007 - 21 comments

Protest-song Percussionist

Metafilter's own flapjax at midnite was interviewed by an English language Japanese webzine named gyaku. Check out flapjax's generous contributions to mefi music here. Do yourself a favor and listen.
posted by Ynoxas on Mar 2, 2007 - 12 comments

Building steam from a grain of salt.

DJ Shadow likes high school bands.
High school bands like DJ Shadow. (2nd link requires Windows Media Player, via Soul Sides)
posted by myopicman on Sep 15, 2005 - 20 comments

Ba-doom badda badda, Ba! doom badda.......

Drums around the world "Drums Around the World is an annual simultaneous world wide drumming day.Our purpose is to Honor the traditions of the drum, celebrate its power to unify humanity." The tenth anniversary of the annual "Drums around the World: ....In 1994, the inaugural event, over 2100 drummers showed up at the main event (facilitated by Baba Olatunji, Hamza El Din, Arthur Hull, John Bergamo, Jim Greiner, Muruga Booker, and Native Drummers) creating the worlds largest drum circle. This event was also broadcast world-wide via satellite (complements of CNN)."

Ever drummed on a Djembe until your hands bled? ....Or wondered why virtually no republicans practice African or indigenous drumming techniques? Are hand drums, to the US far right, a spooky talesman which evokes lurid fantasies of wild satanic or Santeria (Voodoo) rituals?
posted by troutfishing on Aug 24, 2003 - 25 comments

The steam-powered drum machine

The steam-powered drum machine - an astonishing extract from the journal of Charles Franklin, the founder of the London Museum of Techno. Written in 1894, Franklin describes a steam-powered drum machine and what may have been the world's first rave. "Driven by the thunderous rhythms of Hoovenaars tremendous "drum machine" the crowd - academics and dockers, architects and cobblers - were whipped into a frenzy, dancing and screaming like savages until sunrise, when the Machine finally ground to a halt with a suffering hiss."
posted by adrianhon on May 20, 2003 - 33 comments

-=Applause=-

History of Applause: What compels us to clap in appreciation? Theories abound. The earliest clapping is found in percussive instruments of ancient Egypt (jpg), while the Bible has us clap in joy, as well as derision. Emperor Nero so craved it he would pay freelancers to applaud his atrocious singing. Applause has even influenced classical compositions.

But, in the age of the pre-planned encore, do we still mean it?
posted by apostasy on Feb 2, 2003 - 17 comments

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