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8 posts tagged with photography by digaman.
Displaying 1 through 8 of 8.

Up, Up, and Away

The 56-Euros-and-a-balloon teenage Catalonian space program.
posted by digaman on Mar 17, 2009 - 37 comments

The Solar Connection

Rethinking Earthrise. On the 40th anniversary of the NASA's Apollo 8 mission [caution: weird JFK animation], which answered Stewart Brand's epochal, LSD-inspired question "Why haven't we seen a photograph of the whole Earth yet?" with an unforgettable image of a seemingly fragile and isolated blue planet, Nature editor Oliver Morton -- author of a new book on photosynthesis called Eating the Sun -- disputes the notion that the Earth is fragile and isolated. "The fragility is an illusion," he writes. "The planet Earth is a remarkably robust thing, and this strength flows from its ancient and intimate connection to the cosmos beyond. To see the photo this way does not undermine its environmental relevance -- but it does recast it."
posted by digaman on Dec 24, 2008 - 39 comments

Holmes' and Watson's World

One minute and four seconds in London, 1904. Birkbeck College professor Ian Christie rediscovered this footage in an archive in Canberra, shot for a travelogue by film pioneer Charles Urban.
posted by digaman on Oct 24, 2008 - 67 comments

A Photo Mag for the Rest of Us

JPG, an online/offline photo magazine "for photographers like us who fall somewhere in between the strict definitions of 'amateur' and 'professional,'" launches today. The impresario of JPG is Derek Powazek, the author of Design for Community, who has a long history of building interesting Web-based community sites, including the personal-storytelling site Fray.com (currently on hiatus). The co-founder of JPG, Powazek's wife Heather Champ, created the haunting Mirror Project.
posted by digaman on Sep 18, 2006 - 24 comments

Prophets and Profits on the Burning Shore

From organically-farming Zen centers to celebrity-cultivating Scientology centresTM, California is a seedbed of the most earnest (and most frivolous or worse) branches of spiritual inquiry. What's in the water in the Golden State that has made it The Visionary State? In an interview with editor Geoff Manaugh of the excellent BLDGBLOG, author Erik Davis -- whose published passions have ranged from an analysis of Philip K. Dick's "divine invasions" to erudite musings on Led Zeppelin's fourth album to an ode to the joys of being a teenage bongeur -- talks about the formerly chic devil-worshipper Anton LaVey, Beat Zen, Aldous Huxley, the Watts Towers, and beyond, with great photos by Michael Rauner, who collaborated with Davis on the new book.
posted by digaman on Aug 10, 2006 - 30 comments

The Commissar and the Apparatchik Vanish

Shades of Stalin's pre-Photoshop erasing of Trotsky from history: Joanne Amos admits to Talking Points Memo's Josh Marshall that her GOP-friendly company, Reflections Photography, scrubbed images of President Bush with disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff from both their online archive and CD record of official events. [Photos previously discussed here.]
posted by digaman on Jan 26, 2006 - 44 comments

Autism Visible

Inside the Spectrum: a hauntingly beautiful and thought provoking little collection of photographs of autistic people by Chris Combs, a fiercely talented photographer in his early 20s who works at the Washington Post. Read Combs' project description here. For more on autism, see here.
posted by digaman on Dec 8, 2005 - 16 comments

Truth as Propaganda

Severed hands and feet, yarmulkes blown off of heads, sides of human torso dripping blood like beef in a butcher shop -- and a cell phone. The Israeli Foreign Ministry has never allowed footage like this to be seen before, but now they have decided to publicize it on their website to push for the construction of the new security fence, the existence of which is an outrage to many Palestianians. Truth as propaganda. [Caution: WMP, and the most graphically violent images I've seen since the infamous photo of Vietnamese kids running from napalm, and the execution of Daniel Pearl.]
posted by digaman on Jan 31, 2004 - 87 comments

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