3740 posts tagged with photography.
Displaying 151 through 200 of 3740. Subscribe:

Memory and Identity

Some are kept in shoe boxes in a forgotten closet corner. Others are glued carefully into albums and kept on the family bookshelf. Many have been lost forever, destroyed out of panic or indifference. In Ukraine, whose tumultuous 20th-century history has spilled over into a bloody battle for its 21st-century identity, every picture tells a story. RFE/RL's Daisy Sindelar traveled to six Ukrainian cities to talk to people about what their old family photographs say to them about who they, and their country, are today. [more inside]
posted by Kabanos on Feb 3, 2015 - 1 comment

To Catch a Penguin

Bellyflopping penguins (slyoutube) Photographer Paul Nicklen, in the Ross Sea: "It became quite comical to see hundreds of penguins flying out of the water and knocking the air out of themselves when they landed on their bellies. I felt a little bit sorry for them, but they were fine. This is what their bodies are designed to do. It was one of the coolest things I’ve seen in my career."
posted by Dashy on Feb 2, 2015 - 32 comments

"It's hard to get animals to look at you like humans do."

In Audubon Magazine, Brad Wilson's amazing photographs of owls. Or photographs of amazing owls. Either works. [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Jan 31, 2015 - 46 comments

Why you should stop relying on your phone, and buy a nice camera

Like beer and pop music, it was easy to make do with what’s cheap and available, only to look back on a life of Dave Matthews and Bud Light and wonder why I’d gotten by on “good enough.” Because I am aging, and because I have the memory of the original Tamagotchi, I am profoundly grateful to have these clear, high-resolution photos of the people I loved and love. [more inside]
posted by craniac on Jan 26, 2015 - 125 comments

Who Owns the Copyright to Vivian Maier's Photographs?

John Maloof and Charlie Siskel’s Finding Vivian Maier is nominated for an Academy Award, Best Feature Documentary. Most people have read about the nanny who worked in complete obscurity, yet may be one of the greatest street photographers of the 20th Century. The filmmakers tell the story of her art and also track down people who knew this eccentric and perhaps troubled artist. Meanwhile, and problematically for Maloof and other owners of Maier’s work, it’s one thing to own the negatives and quite another to own copyright that allows for printing and publishing those negatives. Maloof thought he had that covered, but in 2013 that came into question. Finally and most recently (2015), perhaps sensing an opportunity for much-needed revenue, the State of Illinois has belatedly opened a file on the Maier Estate and notified owners and galleries to be prepared for legal inquiry. The documentary is streaming on the major distributors (Netflix, Amazon, GooglePlay).
posted by Short Attention Sp on Jan 24, 2015 - 22 comments

All Sports Illustrated Staff Photographers Fired

Sports Illustrated director of photography Brad Smith confirmed the move this morning to News Photographer magazine. "It's true," Smith said. "There was a decision made through the company to restructure various departments, including at Sports Illustrated. Unfortunately economic circumstances are such that it has cut the six staff photographers."
posted by Quonab on Jan 23, 2015 - 44 comments

Thar she blows!

The whale approached them, stopped, pointed straight downward, and then, in the words of underwater photographer Keri Will, “the storm began.” Keri and his fellow divers were caught in the thick of a massive whale poop. As he described to CBC Radio, "If you held your hand in front of your face you wouldn't be able to see your hand any more because the water was so thick with the faecal matter." [more inside]
posted by Kabanos on Jan 23, 2015 - 56 comments

Pictures of decay and ruin

" I mostly photograph empty buildings with great staircases inside. I simply adore old decaying architecture, their patterns and textures – they remind me that everything is impermanent."
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Jan 18, 2015 - 30 comments

"the pull of sentimentality away from reality’s hardness"

On Sentimentality: A Critique of Humans of New York [more inside]
posted by kenko on Jan 17, 2015 - 44 comments

"This is our war for peace."

Since 2010, Freelance Afghan journalist Bilal Sarwary has been tweeting photos with the hashtags #AfghanistanYouNeverSee and #EveryDayLifeInAghanistan showing sides of the country that rarely make it into Western media. [more inside]
posted by smoke on Jan 14, 2015 - 7 comments

gotham from above

Imagine leaning out of an open door of a helicopter 7,500 feet over New York City on a very dark and chilly night... (making of)
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jan 12, 2015 - 4 comments

Comfort Objects

Photographs of children with their most treasured objects.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jan 11, 2015 - 41 comments

There's a camera in the fuel tank of this rocket

Early Saturday morning, Space-X launched CRS-5, another supply run to the International Space Station. It was also an attempt to land the first stage on a barge in the Atlantic ocean, in hopes of recovering the booster to keep costs down. It failed, but came really close. But the most impressive aspect of this launch were the views from the internal LO2 tank camera of the 2nd stage. [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Jan 10, 2015 - 43 comments

The Art of Saving a Life

The Art of Saving a Life, sponsored by the Gates Foundation, is a collection of stories about vaccination and immunization, as told by more than 30 world-renowned photographers, painters, sculptors, writers, filmmakers, and musicians. The intent is to promote vaccination just in time for an international effort to raise funds to inoculate millions, especially in poor nations. The full collection of art will be unveiled over the course of January 2015.
posted by gemutlichkeit on Jan 7, 2015 - 1 comment

It looks a bit empty. Try to make everything bigger.

What not to say to a graphic designer. What not to say to a photographer. What not to say to a dj
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Jan 1, 2015 - 88 comments


The Guardian - Best photographs of 2014 (NSFW) [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Dec 29, 2014 - 34 comments

38,686 Civil Engineers

"This subreddit is exclusively for pictures of infrastructure. Paved roads and other public transit, agriculture, freight, waste management, and water systems are all things we could live without but we really don't want to (and they look cool too)" [more inside]
posted by growabrain on Dec 26, 2014 - 16 comments

How close are you willing to get?

2014: The Year in Pictures. [SLNYT]
posted by skycrashesdown on Dec 25, 2014 - 24 comments

The six-minute ‘True Detective’ tracking shot, and the night TV changed

"Over the course of eight episodes, Fukunaga essentially rewrote the visual language of a televised cop show. Gone were the traditional establishing exterior shot of a police department, leading to an establishing shot of an office, a two-shot of the players, and a series of reaction shots between them as a conversation takes place. Here we had a director who seemed to take every frame, every movement, every bit of shadow, and every movement of the camera as seriously as the story."
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Dec 23, 2014 - 33 comments

Follow That Dog!

The adventures of Maya, an English bulldog with a flair for the dramatic.
posted by ThePinkSuperhero on Dec 22, 2014 - 7 comments

“Colour is too noisy; the eye doesn’t know where to rest"

Bye Bye Jane; RIP
Jane Bown died today aged 89. Her portrait of Beckett is legendary.
The Observer ( Guardian on Sunday )editor, John Mulholland, called her "part of the Observer’s DNA”.
Obituaries: Guardian and Telegraph.
A brief look at her life in photography.
She gave her archive to he Guardian where she worked for 65 years.
Known mainly for her portraits of the great and the good here is the unseen Jane Bown
For over 40 years she used an Olympus OM 1 released in 1973.
Earlier this year a BioPic was released 'Looking for Light: Jane Bown'
posted by adamvasco on Dec 21, 2014 - 13 comments

Birdies, prunes, cheese and whiskey: smiling (or not) for the camera

... in the Victorian era (1837-1901), a small, tightly controlled mouth was considered beautiful. They took their cues from much of Europe's fine-art portraiture. Some say photographers even suggested those posing say "prunes" to heighten the effect. Smiling was something captured on children, peasants and drunkards, hardly something you'd want for your family legacy.

Then, there was the matter of oral hygiene.
Advances in dental care and ubiquitous technology: why people started smiling for the camera, and why we say cheese, with a whistling bird, some whiskey, and a little flash game thrown in for good measure. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 19, 2014 - 10 comments

A print can last for thousands of years, emulating the age of the trees.

Beth Moon photographs trees, Ancient Trees.
A few more from the gallery "portraits of time" which has links to further galleries.
In her methodology and in an interview by Lenscratch about her collection "Between Earth and Sky" she explains her photos as a Noble Process in a digital age.
posted by adamvasco on Dec 15, 2014 - 5 comments

"This is the fairy-land; O spite of spites!"

British photographer Kirsty Mitchell's hauntingly beautiful photographs of a stylized fairy wonderland.
posted by Kitteh on Dec 15, 2014 - 9 comments

Beauty is cheap if you point a camera at a grand phenomenon of nature

The world's most expensive photograph sold for $6.5 million. But is it art?
posted by monospace on Dec 11, 2014 - 133 comments

Do you have any idea how many phone calls we'll get?

Seasoned news photographer John Harte is telling stories, naming names, and even sharing unpublished pictures from his 28-year stint at The Bakersfield Californian at a new blog, You can't have my job, but I'll tell you a story: My three decades of photojournalism in one hell of a news town. Be warned that some of these photos may be disturbing. (They include images of dead children — notably the famous, award-winning, and highly controversial Hart Park drowning photo, which generated 500 calls of protest and a bomb threat against the newspaper.) Less-upsetting highlights include the stories in these individual entries: Meet the sheriff! My first arrest, We can't upset our readers!, and The greatest sports photo in history.
posted by Mothlight on Dec 11, 2014 - 25 comments

"...like taking a Polaroid but on glass."

Photographer Jonathan Keys is taking a step back from modern techniques and using a Collodion camera (previously) that dates back to the 1880's and uses a wet plate process. Here's his Flickr gallery.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Dec 11, 2014 - 5 comments

Consumer culture, sort of

PES makes an unconventional submarine sandwich.
posted by gilrain on Dec 10, 2014 - 14 comments

It's as if he were the wind or weather itself.

Vyacheslav Korotki is a man of extreme solitude. He is a trained polyarnik, a specialist in the polar north, a meteorologist.
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 10, 2014 - 7 comments

Oslo gets a long winter, a decent summer, and a short spring and autumn

In years past, Eirik Solheim has been interested in capturing the passing of a year, as seen in his wooded yard in Oslo. In 2010, he set up his camera to take an image every half hour, and from that, he selected 3888 photos to serve as single pixel-wide samples in a photo collage of the year. He also selected 3500 shots for a timelapse video of the year, with and without zoom. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 6, 2014 - 20 comments

The Mesmerizing Architecture of Mosques

The Mesmerizing Architecture of Mosques "Iranian photographer Mohammad Reza Domiri gives us an opportunity to see the entirety of these incredible spaces all at once. His fully panoramic, expansive photographs of centuries-old mosques reveal the genius of their geometries and complexity. The effect is dizzying in a different way, like some kind of fractalized religious hallucination."
posted by dhruva on Dec 5, 2014 - 15 comments

Veteran Art Project

The Veteran Art Project is a visual experiment by 27-year-old photographer Devin Mitchell "who is exploring a part of the veteran’s experience that is sometimes difficult to articulate." [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Dec 5, 2014 - 2 comments

Orange Julius and a Hotdog

1989: America's malls. The places where nothing — and everything — has changed. In 1989, Michael Galinsky, then a 20-year-old student, took a month to traverse the U.S. Everywhere he went, he documented the same place: the shopping mall. The results are now an archive of a vanished world, simultaneously familiar and foreign, trivial and full of meaning.
posted by standardasparagus on Dec 3, 2014 - 163 comments

"Managing to serve the perfect drink and stay upright (mostly)"

1920s – 1930s: The ice-skating waiters of Switzerland. Enough said.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 1, 2014 - 8 comments

Approaching shadow

With a knife in his hand, a pig butcher said he would chop me. He wanted his spirit back.

Fan Ho's black and white street photography of 1950s Hong Kong
posted by KirkpatrickMac on Nov 26, 2014 - 19 comments

It pretty much landed in my lap

I’ve been watching Odell Beckham practice similar one-handed catches for the past several weeks. He caught half a dozen in practice before Sunday’s game, and had an amazing one-handed fingertip catch in practice several weeks ago. So he was definitely on my radar screen. Today I was making a point of keeping track of where Beckham lined up, so I would be ready. -- The New York Times interviews photographers about how they themselves caught this incredible catch in the Giants game last night.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Nov 24, 2014 - 43 comments

Magical Contamination

Seashells? Distant planets? Beautiful mold.
posted by FirstMateKate on Nov 23, 2014 - 3 comments

Quite Pretty Until the Shoveling Starts

Drone footage of the snow storm aftermath in West Seneca. NY. [slyt | 4k]
posted by quin on Nov 21, 2014 - 32 comments

Nothing but a Berliner

This post contains nudity.
Photographic history is chock-full of people who were painters before they became photographers, but very few were in women's wear to begin with.
When Hitler came to power in 1933, Erwin Blumenfeld produced this premonitory photomontage which in 1943 the US Airforce dropped in their millions over Germany cities.
Possibly his most famous early work is the series Nude under wet veil reflecting Botticelli and Cranach .
From his early Dada and Surrealist photomontages to his later New York fashion shoots, Erwin Blumenfeld insistently parodied objects of desire.
Here is an illustrated lifeline and a brief bio. from weimarart blogspot.
His fashion shots were masterpieces as were some of his nudes.
73 Thumbnails and wiki.
posted by adamvasco on Nov 20, 2014 - 16 comments

Ruin Porn Ruins Chernobyl

Photographers prowl the streets of Pripyat . ...at each new location we visited, photographers were picking up dolls and books and clothes, draping them across steel-strung beds or sitting them upright on mantelpieces. However in trying to show the truth, these visitors are slowly destroying it. [more inside]
posted by Omnomnom on Nov 20, 2014 - 26 comments

The best catwoman cosplay ever

Superheroes and other pop culture icons photographed in the style of Flemish paintings, by Sacha Goldberger (previously known for his true superhero grandmother Mamika, who is also featured in the superhero series).
posted by elgilito on Nov 18, 2014 - 16 comments

We are dreamers, sisters, fighters.

"When I began thinking about my own transition in 2008, I worried what people would think of me, and how they would see me," photographer Rhys Harper recently explained of being transgender and photographing trans subjects. "As a photographer ... I wanted to photograph people in a way that challenged the assumptions people make about transgender people, and gender non-conforming people." Cosmopolitan (!) showcases 14 photos from the show. [Trans 101 from GLAAD; Trans 101 from T-VOX]
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering on Nov 18, 2014 - 13 comments

Hip Hop When The World Was Young

In the early 1990s, photographer and cinematographer Lisa Leone was a fixture on the New York hip hop scene. She recently uncovered a trove of old behind-the-scenes photos of iconic rappers and breakdancers, which have been collected into the book Here I Am, and are currently on exhibit at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. The New York Times' Lens blog has an excellent selection of the shots.
posted by Diablevert on Nov 18, 2014 - 4 comments

“the human element was vital for this series”

“Best Before End”: Photographing Energy Drinks [The New Yorker] In “Best Before End,” Stephen Gill in processes film negatives in a variety of popular energy drinks. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Nov 17, 2014 - 3 comments

Nicholas Vreeland: Monk with a Camera

Diana Vreeland, noted fashion columnist and editor-in-chief of Vogue magazine from 1963 until 1971, once famously said, "Pink is the new black." This post is about her grandson, Nicholas Vreeland, who as a teenager worked as an assistant to legendary photographers Irving Penn and Richard Avedon (both friends of Grandma). Nicholas began studying Tibetan Buddhism in 1977. This (8:39) PBS Video from 6/15/2012 provides some background: "Buddhist Abbot Nicholas Vreeland". Now, the trailer to Monk with a Camera: The Life and Journey of Nicholas Vreeland", a documentary film by Guido Santi and Tina Mascara, has a North American release date of 11/21/14. A Leica Camera Blog article: Nicholas Vreeland: Capturing Photographs to Honor and Preserve His World. Perhaps you would just enjoy seeing some of what Nicholas Vreeland can do with that camera. Enjoy!
posted by spock on Nov 17, 2014 - 2 comments

More on those photogenic Japanese macaques, aka snow monkeys

Last February, a Japanese snow monkey got hold of someone's smart phone (as discussed on Reddit and elsewhere), and Marsel van Oosten captured a great view of that same Japanese macaque, winning accolades and awards around the 'net and globe. If you'd like to know even more, he chatted with the 500 px ISO blog, discussing these hot-tub bathing macaques and nature photography in general. If you'd like to know more about Japanese macaques in general, here's a broad overview of the photogenic monkeys, and an hour long PBS documentary to delve even deeper. (Snow Monkeys bathing in hot springs previously)
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 17, 2014 - 14 comments

The side eye that shook the world

Sophia Loren explains the famous photograph of her and Jayne Mansfield. Sophia Loren: 15 Photos of My Life
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Nov 7, 2014 - 28 comments

singular stylings

Slavik's Street Style - over a 2-year period, Ukrainian photographer Yurko Dyachyshyn took dozens of portraits chronicling the remarkable daily stylings of a 55-year-old homeless man living in the city of Lviv.
posted by madamjujujive on Nov 6, 2014 - 8 comments

When the famous start thinking of immortality, they call for Karsh

In Yousuf Karsh's 93 years, he had amassed more than 15,000 sittings to his name, capturing portraits of famous and worldly people. He rose to international prominence due to his portrait of Winston Churchill in 1941. At first, it was an honor for the amateur Karsh to walk up to or invite people to photograph them. After that, it became a privilege for future subjects to be accepted into Karsh's gallery. Karsh's website is a source for great insight into the photographer's life, in his own words and through his works. You can read more in this 1988 interview Karsh gave to the Paris Voice, see a few more portraits from the Smithsonian Magazine, and view an interview in three parts. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 6, 2014 - 8 comments

jaunty jackets register at the Shah Abbas

GQ’s Persian Excursion, 1969
posted by timshel on Nov 6, 2014 - 7 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 75