839 posts tagged with poetry.
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Karma

"If I could write this shit in fire, I would write this shit in fire." Dominique Christina delivers the fiercest poem you'll ever hear.
posted by billiebee on Aug 22, 2015 - 23 comments

Flowetry in motion

2009 UK Slam Poetry Champion Hollie McNish, aka Hollie Poetry, questions our attitudes on immigration with Mathematics. [more inside]
posted by urbanwhaleshark on Aug 20, 2015 - 11 comments

Road tripping back in time on the Old Spanish Trail

In 1915, there were many ways to drive across and around in the United States (though trans-continental routes were mostly dirt, with some improved sections). So why did a group meet that same year to develop another cross-country road, one that would take 15 years to complete, rather than tying together existing segments? Tourism to their communities, mostly, but their* Old Spanish Trail also boasted of being the shortest route from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Today, you can still find remnants of that road, and there's a group of people who are trying to revive this historic highway. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 17, 2015 - 13 comments

St Anthony St Anthony, Please come round

St Anthony: An Ode to Anthony H Wilson aka Tony Wilson, founder of Factory Records by Mike Garry and Joe Duddell. More on the project here. Happy Mondays' Rowetta on Tony Wilson: 'He made you love Manchester'
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 12, 2015 - 7 comments

Don't forget yourself

Unfinished Letters From the Most Popular Kid in the Psych Ward (TW: mentions of sexual assault, profound mental illness events). , an article by woman of colour, poet, sometime interviewer, and activist Casey Rocheteau. Her blog is well worth reading, too. In 2014, she became the first recipient of the Write a House writer's residency in Detroit.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering on Aug 11, 2015 - 12 comments

2,500 people in their clean picnic clothes

One hundred years ago today, the SS Eastland, about to set out for a company picnic in Indiana, tipped over at its dock in the Chicago River with over 2,500 people aboard. Eight hundred and forty-four of them died in one of the worst non-military maritime disasters in American history. The Chicago Tribune has published some previously unseen photographs of the recovery efforts. [warning: a couple of these are potentially disturbing] [more inside]
posted by theodolite on Jul 24, 2015 - 39 comments

"Only those who have strayed follow the poets"

Battle Lines is an essay by academics Robyn Creswell and Bernard Haykel in The New Yorker on the poetry of jihadis, especially those who follow the Islamic State. They argue that the way to understand them is to study their cultural products, especially poetry, which is part of their daily socialization, as discussed in this video. Poetry has a special status in the Arab world. Elisabeth Kendall explores that context in her essay Yemen’s al-Qa'ida and Poetry as a Weapon of Jihad. Jihadi poetry is closely linked to the nasheed tradition of songs which are usually sung a capella. Behnam Said traces their history in the essay Hymns ( Nasheeds): A Contribution to the Study of the Jihadist Culture.
posted by Kattullus on Jul 17, 2015 - 11 comments

Today, I broke your solar system. Oops.

Pluto Shits on the Universe - a poem by Fatimah Asghar. Here's the text. [via]
posted by brundlefly on Jul 17, 2015 - 25 comments

Lament for the Dead

Lament for the Dead is an online community poetry project which will mark the death of every person killed by police this summer, and every police officer who loses life in the line of duty, with a poem
posted by hydropsyche on Jul 15, 2015 - 9 comments

James Tate, 1943-2015

We lost the incomparable poet James Tate yesterday. [more inside]
posted by West of House on Jul 9, 2015 - 19 comments

so much depends

"On July 18, in a moment of belated poetic justice, a stone will be laid on the otherwise unmarked grave of Thaddeus Marshall, an African-American street vendor from Rutherford, N.J., noting his unsung contribution to American literature."
posted by How the runs scored on Jul 6, 2015 - 12 comments

The severity and sympathy of Ezra Pound

As bread owes something to the wheat winnower, etc. So much happening in between. A letter from Ezra Pound to French critic/academic, Rene Taupin. [more inside]
posted by GrapeApiary on Jul 1, 2015 - 6 comments

Tell me how all this, and love too, will ruin us

Richard Siken (previously) published his second book of poetry, War of the Foxes, in April. Supernatural fans thought it was fanfic - specifically Wincest - and have used many lines to fuel their own slash. Meanwhile, Siken himself has become involved in Sherlock slash. The Awl's Adam Carlson interviews Siken about all this and more, including I Can Haz Siken.
posted by Athanassiel on Jun 23, 2015 - 14 comments

Summer Reading List

22 Books by Black Authors to Add to Your Beach Bag this Summer In response to recently published summer reading lists from The New York Times and NPR that featured mostly White authors, Blavity shares a list of 22 summer reads from Black authors. [more inside]
posted by aka burlap on Jun 19, 2015 - 16 comments

“I write while I’m walking, on little scraps of paper,”

Juan Felipe Herrera, From Farm Fields to Poet Laureate [New York Times]
The Library of Congress announced on Wednesday that Juan Felipe Herrera, a son of migrant farmworkers whose writing fuses wide-ranging experimentalism with reflections on Mexican-American identity, will be the next poet laureate. The appointment of Mr. Herrera, who will succeed Charles Wright, comes as the country is debating immigration, a recurring subject of his work, which has been collected in books like “Border-Crosser With a Lamborghini Dream” and “187 Reasons Mexicanos Can’t Cross the Border.”
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Jun 10, 2015 - 6 comments

Hundreds of poems, introduced and interpreted by Carol Rumens

Poem of the Week is a series in The Guardian's books section, originally started by Sarah Crown but quickly taken over by poet, playwright and professor Carol Rumens. Every week she selects, introduces and interprets one poem. The archive has about four hundred poems, with only a few repeat poets, so here are a few favorites, ranging from English-language classics (John Donne, John Keats, Emily Dickinson), contemporary poets (Shazea Quraishi, Kei Miller, Katha Pollit) translated classics (Wang Wei, Horace, Rainer Maria Rilke), translated contemporary writers (Tua Forsström, Zeng Di, Aurélia Lassaque) the unfairly neglected (Adelaide Crapsey, Rosemary Tonks, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu), avant-garde (Gertrude Stein, Hugo Ball, John Ashbery) and anonymous (The Lyke-Wake Dirge, The Bridal Morn, This Endris Night). There are hundreds more on all kinds of subjects by all kinds of poets.
posted by Kattullus on Jun 9, 2015 - 6 comments

Sing with more terror!!!

The Average Fourth Grader Is a Better Poet Than You (and Me Too) [more inside]
posted by casarkos on Jun 8, 2015 - 18 comments

here I come, taking the floor to recite a page of quatrains

When the family business is ribald wedding poetry.
posted by curious nu on Jun 1, 2015 - 2 comments

That Whitsun, I was late getting away

Phillip Larkin was one of Britain's most famous twentieth century poets. He's probably most well known for 'This Be The Verse' (nsfw) but another notable poem was 'The Whitsun Weddings' based on a railway journey or journeys he undertook from Hull to London fifty years ago. Fellow poet Ian McMillan revisits that journey.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on May 24, 2015 - 14 comments

English 111 / Comp Lit 115

Experimental Writing Seminar: Constraints & Collaborations. In addition to setting out a few dozen writing exercises, the online syllabus for an introductory course taught by Charles Bernstein (poet and co-editor of L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E) links to a variety of poems, poetry generators, and prose experiments on the web. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on May 20, 2015 - 4 comments

Her outrage was an inextricable part of her humanity

May 16 is officially Denise Levertov Day in Seattle. On the eve of this celebration of her life and work, Paul Constant covers the personal, artistic transformations of Levertov by asking, "How do you immortalize a willfully uncategorizable poet?" Jan Wallace writes of remembering and bearing witness. Emily Warn traces nature and spirituality in Levertov's work.
posted by mixedmetaphors on May 15, 2015 - 3 comments

Library of Congress Launches Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature

The Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress dates back to 1943, when Allen Tate was Consultant in Poetry. It contains nearly two thousand recordings—of poets and prose writers participating in literary events at the Library’s Capitol Hill campus as well as sessions at the Library’s Recording Laboratory. Highlights from the collection include: Kurt Vonnegut, Margaret Atwood, Ray Bradbury, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Mario Vargas Llosa, Rita Dove, Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks, W.S. Merwin, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Clampitt, Robert Pinsky , and Miłosz, Czesław, among many others. [more inside]
posted by Toekneesan on Apr 16, 2015 - 7 comments

"tell that I was loved by the Muses and that the Locrian land bore me"

12 short poems is all that remains of the work of Nossis, one of the most beloved of the Ancient Greek poets. Exactly when she lived is uncertain, but it's certain that she was from Locri, which was on the "toe" of Italy. You can read about what archaeologists have found out about the ancient city on the website Locri Epizephyrii, Welcome To Magna Graecia. Scholars have tried to use Nossis' poetry to explain the particulars of life in Locri, looking for support for claims that noble status descended matrilineally. Marilyn B. Skinner looks at the status of women and explores the "unusual aspects of religious practice at Locri" in her essay Nossis and Women's Cult at Locri. You can read different translations of some of Nossis' poems, three by Skinner and two by Diane Rayor.
posted by Kattullus on Apr 7, 2015 - 5 comments

"All of the capybara trivia in it is true"

Measure Yourself by the Standard of the Capybara
April is both Mathematics Awareness Month and National Poetry Month, so logically we should be reading mathematical poetry. "Unit of Measure" by Sandra Beasley is a perfect poem for this purpose. This year [2014]’s Mathematics Awareness Month theme is “mathematics, magic, and mystery.” How could a poem that proposes the capybara as a universal ruler not be magical? How could the fishiness of the capybara not be mysterious?
[more inside] posted by Lexica on Apr 1, 2015 - 11 comments

"There is something maddeningly attractive about the untranslatable"

Variations on the Right to Remain Silent is an essay by poet and classicist Anne Carson about translation, cliché, divine language and the way some words violently resist being explained. She touches on Homer, Sappho, Joan of Arc, Friedrich Hölderlin, and the painter Francis Bacon.
posted by Kattullus on Mar 28, 2015 - 6 comments

Everything that happened was for both of us a prehistory of our future

In 1910 and 1911, Anna Akhmatova and Amadeo Modigliani were in love. She was a then-unknown Russian poet who would return to Russia and struggle within the Soviet system before being widely acknowledged as one of Russia's great poets; he was a mercurial artist who would be dead within 10 years, but whose art would capture the imagination of future generations. [more inside]
posted by julen on Mar 26, 2015 - 15 comments

When the Glimpse Is Worth More than the Glare

A Poem Composed Entirely of SXSW Panel Titles
posted by Potomac Avenue on Mar 16, 2015 - 7 comments

more weight than so much of what is printed on paper

Founded by celebrated poet and White House guest Kenneth Goldsmith, Ubuweb for years has been housing massive gigabites of work that exists outside the lines—from audio archives of rare performances by avant-garde musicians and video artists, known and unknown, to whole lifetimes of textual and interpretative work dug up and given new life online. -- Vice on how Ubu Publishes the Unpublishable. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Mar 9, 2015 - 12 comments

Bittersweet

Since the late 19th century, the amount of her writing we have access to has more than doubled and our views of sexuality have changed, leading to constant modern reexamination of one of the greatest poets the world has ever seen: Who was Sappho? And just how much does her sexuality and her personal life matter to a discussion of her work?
Some ancient writers assumed that there had to have been two Sapphos: one the great poet, the other the notorious slut. There is an entry for each in the Suda. The uncertainties plaguing the biography of literature’s most famous Lesbian explain why classicists who study Sappho like to cite the entry for her in Monique Wittig and Sande Zeig’s “Lesbian Peoples: Material for a Dictionary” (1979). To honor Sappho’s central position in the history of female homosexuality, the two editors devoted an entire page to her. The page is blank. . . . Even as we strain to hear this remarkable woman’s sweet speech, the thrumming in our ears grows louder.
Previously: Metafilter (awesomely) tackles the newly discovered "Brothers Poem" in real time.
posted by sallybrown on Mar 9, 2015 - 41 comments

The final days of Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva

On Tsvetaeva, tragedy and the end of the tsarist era. There's a whole series of these articles about Russian poets told through their last days. A bit morbid, but quite appropriate tributes to the artists, as well as a good starting-point for those interested in Russian poetry.
posted by averysmallcat on Feb 28, 2015 - 3 comments

Bringing a Daughter Back From the Brink with Poems

The most optimistic people often struggle the hardest. They can’t quite square what’s going on in the world with their beliefs, and the disparity is alarming. [slnyt]
posted by ellieBOA on Feb 28, 2015 - 40 comments

Drawing me back through night’s dark maze

'041' by Iain Banks [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 14, 2015 - 6 comments

Invite the bee, your player, to imagine something greater.

A Beekeeper's Guide to Game Design
posted by danb on Feb 10, 2015 - 7 comments

I wish I could borrow the sun and light your darkened rooms.

Dear all the women who ever existed over the entire span of human history is a performance of the poem Letter to a wish by Emilie Zoey Baker, accompanied on the fiddle by The Man Who Wasn't There (Andrew Watson).
posted by Kerasia on Feb 4, 2015 - 4 comments

Why (Aboriginal) Australia Will Not Recover From the Intervention

'waiting for a heart attack': Ali Cobby Eckermann writes about her first-hand experience of the Northern Territory National Emergency Response as the Art Centre Manager at Titjikala. This includes poetry based on her experiences and this may trigger upsetting emotional issues for some readers as it deals with fall out of colonisation, alcoholism and domestic violence.
posted by nfalkner on Feb 1, 2015 - 14 comments

Four Translations of Dante’s Inferno

Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita mi ritrovai per una selva oscura che la diritta via era smarrita Zappulla: Halfway along the journey of our life, Ciardi: Midway in our life’s journey I went astray Mandelbaum: When I had journeyed half of our life’s way, Hollander: At the midpoint in the journey of our life
[more inside] posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 15, 2015 - 28 comments

"Love in Ulster"

Danderin' down the loanin'
On a day of spring wi' Kathy McIlvenna
Says I, "The whin's a tidy thing,"
Says she, "I wouldn't wonder,
But I never thought much about whins," says she,
An' me just studyin' to be polite,
Ach, girls is a mystery to me, girls is quare!
[more inside]
posted by growabrain on Jan 14, 2015 - 2 comments

Tomaž Šalamun is a sphere rushing through the air.*

Late in 2014, master avant garde Slovenian poet Tomaž Šalamun passed away at his home in Ljubljana. During his life, he published 30 books of poetry, and was honored with the Prešeren Fund Prize, the Jenko Prize (twice), a Pushcart Prize, a visiting Fulbright to Columbia University, and a fellowship to the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa. [more inside]
posted by elmer benson on Jan 12, 2015 - 4 comments

"T.S. Eliot, the stink-bombing Nobel prizewinner"

[T.S. Eliot] both recognised and skewered in Four Quartets the routines of "eminent men of letters" who became "chairmen of many committees". As a banker, then as a publisher, he worked at jobs where committees were de rigueur and he accomplished his work with aplomb. Yet part of him always sought an escape hatch, a way to elude his official self. His nephew Graham Bruce Fletcher remembers Uncle Tom taking him as a boy to a London joke shop in the 1960s. They bought stink bombs and let them off at the entrance of the Bedford Hotel, not far from Eliot's workplace in Bloomsbury's Russell Square. With a fit of giggles, Eliot put on a marked turn of speed as, Macavity-like, he and his nephew sped from the scene of the crime, Eliot twirling his walking stick "in the manner of Charlie Chaplin".
TS Eliot: the poet who conquered the world, 50 years on by Robert Crawford, poet and biographer of Eliot. You can listen to a lecture by him entitled T. S. Eliot's daughter on the poem Marina. You can hear it, and other poems, read in between classical music as part of an episode of Words and Music. And if you want to get to know the poet, the T. S. Eliot Society keeps tabs on what works are freely available online.
posted by Kattullus on Jan 12, 2015 - 19 comments

Phenomenally.

Maya Angelou's posthumous hip hop project Caged Bird Songs, has a new music video for Harlem Hopscotch.
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 28, 2014 - 2 comments

over their charred ashes / scattered on the horizon

The great Iraqi poet Badr Shakir al-Sayyab died fifty years ago today, on December 24, 1964. [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Dec 28, 2014 - 2 comments

"As such, Helen herself has a beauty rating of 1.186 helens"

in the iliad helen speaks the last lament for hector. the only man in troy who showed her kindness is slain—and now, helen says, πάντες δέ με πεφρίκασιν, all men shudder at me. she doesn't speak in the iliad again. homer isn’t cruel to helen; her story is cruel enough.
[more inside] posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 18, 2014 - 28 comments

Nu scylun hergan Gehyrst Hlaf

I am irrationally pleased by God-night, Rune and The Cat in the Hwæt, two Old English translations by Cassandra Rasmussen.
posted by Joe in Australia on Dec 14, 2014 - 38 comments

i carry your dick pic with me (i carry it in my heart)

Classic Poems, Updated For the Internet Age from The Hairpin.
posted by maryr on Dec 3, 2014 - 17 comments

this never wanting it to end

Mark Strand, 1934-2014. (NY Times) [more inside]
posted by spitbull on Nov 30, 2014 - 33 comments

For John Dillinger

William S. Burroughs’ “The Thanksgiving Prayer,” Shot by Gus Van Sant [YouTube]
“Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 28, 1986” first appeared in print in Tornado Alley, a chapbook published by William S. Burroughs in 1989. Two years later, Gus Van Sant (Good Will Hunting, My Own Private Idaho, Milk) shot a montage that brought the poem to film, making it at least the second time the director adapted the beat writer to film.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Nov 26, 2014 - 14 comments

I wanted him back—not his poems

Liam Hoare writes about warrior poets Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, their brief acquaintance and their influence on each other. "I spun round you a satellite for a month, but I shall swing out soon, a dark star in the orbit where you will blaze." [more inside]
posted by Athanassiel on Nov 12, 2014 - 30 comments

"By the assembly line I stood straight like iron, hands like flight"

The poetry and brief life of a Foxconn worker: Xu Lizhi (1990-2014) is an article about a 24-year old Chinese assembly line worker and poet who committed suicide last month. He worked for the electronics manufacturer which makes products for a range of companies, including Sony, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft and Nintendo. The post includes Chinese originals and English translations of Xu Lizhi's poems. His death and poetry have garnered much attention, such as these blogposts from The Wall Street Journal and The London Review of Books.
posted by Kattullus on Nov 12, 2014 - 19 comments

I'll come at night / for no one censures / traveling the path of dreams

We know very little about Ono no Komachi aside from that she was Japanese, female, a poet, and the subject of numerous medieval legends about her beauty and hard-heartedness, with her name becoming a metonym for a beautiful woman (much like Helen is in English). Our best guess as to her dates is "active in the 850s," and as to her background, "probably a lady-in-waiting to someone in the capital," though tradition has spun out many speculations. Based on 22 poems thought reliably attributed to her, she is considered today one of Japan's greatest woman poets, noted in particular for her passionate love poems and her technical mastery, especially at using words with multiple meanings.

This last feature makes her difficult to translate, of course, but nonetheless people keep trying -- her most famous poem, selected for the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu, is one of the most-translated poems from any language. Links to several attempts at her corpus inside. [more inside]
posted by Quasirandom on Nov 11, 2014 - 19 comments

Written with nightbird quills and ink-of-dedication

I try to do two things with my style. The first is to pay attention to how the words sound together ... The other thing is to juxtapose odd images.
Sometimes ornate, sometimes economical, and always striking, Yoon Ha Lee's short fiction combines motifs from fantasy and science fiction with remarkable fruitfulness: "There are soldiers and scientists, space travel and dragons, leather-bound books, locked doors, and genocidal rampages. Each tale strains at the edges of possibility. No two of Lee's stories are alike, except for a similar pulse powering each word, each juxtaposition, each startling turn of events." Much of Lee's output is available online, including dozens of flash fiction fairy tales and two works of interactive fiction. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on Nov 9, 2014 - 13 comments

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