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Go, Rimbaud!

Arthur Rimbaud Documentary [via pb] is an impressionistic tour of Rimbaud's life, from a provincial upbringing, through his teenage poetic revolution, to his world travels and moderately successful business career in the Horn of Africa, featuring contemporary photographs, some taken by Rimbaud, and readings by Joan Baez. His poems (English translations, French, with some translated into English, earlier translations, with French originals) were fundamental in overthrowing the established traditions of writing and his personal story has long been an inspiration to those who chafe under the strictures of society. Ruth Franklin wrote about the whole arc of Rimbaud's life in The New Yorker, while Edmund White focuses on Rimbaud's bull-in-a-china-shop entrance into fellow poet Paul Verlaine's bourgeois existence in The Guardian. You can also read earlier biographical writings on Rimbaud, including his sister Isabelle's hagiographic account. Rimbaud's poetry has been set to music, perhaps most notably by electronic musician Hector Zazou and chansonnier Léo Ferré (links to music below the cut). [more inside]
posted by Kattullus on Nov 7, 2010 - 13 comments

"I realized it is basically insane to make any kind of judgment about rap without hearing it."

Listening to Rap for the First Time, with a Book Critic
posted by OverlappingElvis on Nov 4, 2010 - 80 comments

plants in sanskrit poetry

Seasonal Poetry in Sanskrit : The blog Sanskrit Literature has been running an excellent series on plants that appear in sanskrit poetry. Some examples : Jasmine (malati), Lotuses and Water Lilies, Mango.
posted by dhruva on Nov 2, 2010 - 6 comments

Hint: It's spelled *Allen*.

Mental Floss has some good stuff, but I really like their quizzes. Especially the "Who Am I" series. Novels. Poets. Actors. Sports. Wonders of the World. [more inside]
posted by phunniemee on Oct 14, 2010 - 13 comments

He made himself a Daddy

Though never a competition, the Def Poetry Jam is a rhyming spin off from its comidic uncle that plays host to some of the most fantastic spoken word from a wonderful breadth of poets and people. The fun and inocent, the declaration of love , your cause the famous and the famouser, the needs of a single woman, the manifest, the virus and one written and delivered with such emotion and power that it left me speachless, "Knock Knock" by Daniel Beaty
posted by Cogentesque on Oct 14, 2010 - 16 comments

tldr;

Raymond Queneau's 100,000,000,000,000 Poems online (annotated, with both French & English text)
posted by juv3nal on Oct 6, 2010 - 16 comments

Audio / Video of some great writers

Archives of the Fellows from the Kelly Writers House - mp3s and videos from some great writers, including David Milch, Joyce Carol Oates, Joan Didion, Art Spiegelman, EL Doctorow, Richard Ford, Robert Creeley and many others.
posted by dobbs on Oct 3, 2010 - 2 comments

"May you keep this memory, the one you’ll never see."

Poet and editor Michael Gizzi, known equally well for his own verbally inventive work and for publishing the work of other innovative poets (he used to edit Hard Press and lingo magazine), has died. He got his start studying at Brown with National Book Award winning poet and editor Keith Waldrop, whose Burning Deck Press published Gizzi's most recent collection, New Depths of Deadpan. The first ("Michael") link has many further links to Google Books versions of Gizzi's collections (as usual semi-blocked, but you can flip through them to get a sense of the career).
posted by aught on Sep 30, 2010 - 4 comments

Thought Audio

Thought Audio is a small, simple and likable free library of classic literature and philosophy MP3 audio downloads.
posted by nickyskye on Sep 27, 2010 - 21 comments

I have measured out my life in login codes.

The .Doc File of J Alfred Prufrock "Let us go then, you and I/When the evening is spread out against the sky/Like a laptop, put in sleep mode on a table..."
posted by magstheaxe on Sep 21, 2010 - 32 comments

Ghost Writer

One of the hottest authors of the 1910s had been dead for over 200 years before she ever published a word. Patience Worth, as channeled through the ouija board of St. Louis housewife Pearl Curran, published several novels and scores of poems before the death of her link to the material world in 1937.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Sep 14, 2010 - 16 comments

Words voiced

textsound is an online experimental sound journal. Some poetry, some music, all mp3s. Ten issues (so far).
posted by klangklangston on Sep 9, 2010 - 6 comments

Poets for the Revolution

Musicians don't often end up on FBI watch lists, but the Last Poets did, thanks to their links with the Black Panthers.
They were the rappers of the civil rights era.
Made in Amerikkka.
Niggers Are Scared Of Revolution!.
Before the White Man Came.
True Blue. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Sep 3, 2010 - 28 comments

Kinda Epic.

While the rest of Europe was expressing itself mainly in the medium of poetry1, focused largely on romantic exploits of the aristocracy, the people of early Iceland were trying something different. At the Icelandic Saga Database you can read of the explots of the late Viking era, in Icelandic or English translation. If you seek a more direct experience, you can view scans of original collections at Saganet. [more inside]
posted by kaibutsu on Aug 30, 2010 - 28 comments

What am I myself but one of your meteors?

"A moment, a moment long, it sail’d its balls of unearthly light over our heads, Then departed, dropt in the night, and was gone" Walt Whitman wrote these words in the poem Year of Meteors, 1859 ’60. Not until this year did a team of forensic astronomers at Texas State University, with the assistance of a painting from the Hudson River School, figure out what he was really talking about. [more inside]
posted by jessamyn on Aug 16, 2010 - 15 comments

Lint In My Pocket - American Civil War poetry

S Thomas Summers teaches writing and literature, and writes poetry about the American Civil War. Some of my favorites. Hat tip: The Atlantic.
posted by Joe in Australia on Aug 12, 2010 - 1 comment

minor chords and towering fifths

Mountain Goats frontman John Darnielle has been writing free-verse poetry on metal albums and other phenomena on his blog for a few months now. [more inside]
posted by theodolite on Aug 5, 2010 - 27 comments

Bob's On The Job

The eccentric independent Australian MP Bob Katter brings bush poetry to campaigning. SYLT.
posted by Fiasco da Gama on Aug 3, 2010 - 32 comments

An Introverts Manifesto

How to be alone. [SLYT]
posted by Taft on Jul 30, 2010 - 101 comments

Million's Poet finalist defies death threats

“When I unveil the truth, a monster appears from his hiding place; barbaric in thinking and action, angry and blind; wearing death as a dress and covering it with a belt; “He speaks from an official, powerful platform, terrorising people and preying on everyone seeking peace; the voice of courage ran away and the truth is cornered and silent, when self-interest prevented one from speaking the truth.”
With these words, delivered in full traditional dress, Hissa Hilal, mother of four, housewife and Saudi feminist advanced to the final round earlier this year in Abu Dhabi’s Million’s Poet television show. With a poem (partially translated above) inspired by what she terms subversive fatwas. In the finals she took 3rd place with the following: [more inside]
posted by edgeways on Jul 28, 2010 - 16 comments

"They were not true, those dreams, those story books of youth..."

Dream Voices: Siegfried Sassoon, Memory and War: artifacts, manuscripts, and illustrations from the diaries and notebooks of the World War I poet, currently on display at Cambridge University Library (exhibition blog), with an accompanying Picasa gallery, and audio slideshow from the BBC.
posted by steef on Jul 24, 2010 - 8 comments

Poetry in Hell

Poetry in Hell contains a complete collection of poems recovered from the Warsaw Ghetto's Ringelblum Archives. The project, which took ten years to complete, gives English translations of poems that are shown in their original Yiddish. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 23, 2010 - 9 comments

Andrea Gibson

Andrea Gibson, slam poet and activist, is not gentle with her truths. Her poetry focuses on gender norms, politics, and the struggles facing queer people today. Her poems include I do, Dive, Blue Blanket, and Photograph.
posted by kylej on Jul 20, 2010 - 21 comments

Natalie Merchant sings poetry

Natalie Merchant performs arrangements of 19th and early 20th century poetry at TED 2010 [more inside]
posted by nangar on Jul 19, 2010 - 8 comments

Nothing

Tuli Kupferberg, poet and co-founder of The Fugs, passed away today at the age of 86. [more inside]
posted by psylosyren on Jul 12, 2010 - 36 comments

What is the utterance?

Flub and Utter: Jordan Scott discusses the role that stuttering plays in his poetry. (Flash) Read more of Scott's work.
posted by roll truck roll on Jul 10, 2010 - 9 comments

'For most people he speaks most eloquently through his verse.'

W.S. Merwin is your new poet laureate.
posted by xowie on Jul 1, 2010 - 53 comments

Tennyson Anyone?

Bounce bounce bounce bounce/ thwackety wackety zingety ping/ hittety backety pingety zang/ wack, thwok, thwack, pok. There's an official tennis poet.
posted by twoleftfeet on Jun 25, 2010 - 16 comments

For while my daily rage maybe diminished, I assure you we are still not finished.

Michael J. Astrue, Social Security Commissioner, aka A.M. Juster, poet.
posted by HumanComplex on Jun 3, 2010 - 6 comments

Listen to presences inside poems. Let them take you where they will.

Sean Haldane, a nominee for the post of professor of poetry at Oxford, talks about his dual life as a poet and neuroscientist
“I now think poetry has more capacity to change people than psychotherapy”
And he also has an interesting blog.
Robert Graves wrote in 1968: “I like Sean’s poems: clean, accurate and no nonsense – they still have the original poetic nap on them. They make sense, which is rare these days”.
From The Psychiatrist 2002: Are poetry and psychotherapy too ‘wet’ for serious psychiatrists?
Poetry Therapy is not new.
posted by adamvasco on May 31, 2010 - 19 comments

Read These on Your Death Bed

Read These on Your Death Bed: Helen Vendler on last poems by James Merrill and Wallace Stevens.
posted by puny human on May 23, 2010 - 33 comments

(The secret ingredient is coriander.)

The translated rarities at Virgil.org include the first biography of Virgil, medieval Aenid fan-fiction, and the poet's recipe for cheese dip. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on May 13, 2010 - 8 comments

I Could Have Used You That Night

Oklahoma poet Lauren Zuniga responds to Oklahoma SB 1878 (which requires women to view a ultrasound image of the fetus an hour before receiving an abortion & allows doctors to refuse to provide contraceptive care) with a poem.
posted by eustacescrubb on May 6, 2010 - 63 comments

Gathering Paradise

Bill Murray Reads Poetry to Construction Workers at Poets House
posted by xod on May 6, 2010 - 21 comments

Zachary Schomburg

On the Monster Hour, there was this monster that used to come out and try to kill everyone in the audience. No one would expect it, not even the producers who were told by the monster he would play a few blues tunes on the piano.
Surrealism done right, by Zachary Schomburg. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Apr 30, 2010 - 39 comments

Anne Spencer: Poet, Gardener, Activist

Anne Spencer (1882-1975) (video tribute from the State Library of Virginia) was a Harlem Renaissance poet, a gardener, a librarian, and an activist. Her work was influential among her peers and successors - as was her legendary and beloved garden in Lynchburg, Va, where she lived for her entire adult life. She wrote only 50 known poems - 25 to 35 of which were published in her lifetime - on topics that were important to her - the beauty of nature, racism and equality, and her faith, including these 8 of her better-known poems , Before the Feast of Shushan, and Lady, Lady. Many of her poems were reprinted in anthologies, but the controversial White Things (c. 1918, published c. 1923, inspired by a particularly horrible lynching of a pregnant woman) was never reprinted. [more inside]
posted by julen on Apr 20, 2010 - 7 comments

Truth to power.

Gil Scott-Heron, Godfather of Rap. Parts 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 and 6.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 16, 2010 - 19 comments

Hwaet!

Anglo-Saxon Aloud: Daily readings (and podcasts) from the Complete Corpus of Anglo Saxon Poetry, presented by Prof. Michael Drout, Wheaton College. For those that like to read along, the Corpus presented in text (no translation, though).
posted by Chrischris on Mar 20, 2010 - 18 comments

Townes Van Zandt poetry

Yesterday Night Dawn: The Unpublished Poetry of Townes Van Zandt by David Broza was released. I heard it last night and have ordered my copy. [more inside]
posted by bjgeiger on Feb 24, 2010 - 15 comments

Seize on, Emily.

Speculations have been made about Van Gogh, Julius Caesar, Dostoyevsky, Napoleon, and many others. A case has been made to add Emily Dickinson to their ranks.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Feb 20, 2010 - 59 comments

her hips, her lips

A powerful poet of the people died Saturday. Lucille Clifton. [more inside]
posted by kozad on Feb 17, 2010 - 16 comments

Frank O'Hara

Frank O'Hara was a New York poet, even though he lived less than half of his 40 years in the city. He grew up in Grafton, MA, was a sonarman in WWII and roomed with Edward Gorey at Harvard before moving to the city he would forever be associated with. Naturally, there was am article on him in The New Yorker a couple of years ago. We're lucky enough to have a number of videos of O'Hara, including a reading of the lovely "Having a Coke with You. There's also quite a bit of audio of him, and I can't but recommend this mp3 of John Ashbery, Alfred Leslie, Bill Berkson and Michelle Elligott reminiscing about O'Hara at the MOMA, where he worked. And there are quite a few of his poems available online, as well as five of the poem-paintings he did with Norman Bluhm. [more inside]
posted by Kattullus on Feb 15, 2010 - 16 comments

B-Rhymes

B-Rhymes is a rhyming dictionary that compares words based on their sounds, making it ideal for finding near-rhymes.
posted by archagon on Feb 15, 2010 - 28 comments

Awwwwww.

Valentines from E.B. White, Mark Twain, Katharine Hepburn, E. E. Cummings, Alexander Hamilton, and Zero Mostel. From libraries and archives around NYC, via the NYT (more info here).
posted by Miko on Feb 14, 2010 - 11 comments

Haikea, Poetry for the Furniture of Melancholy

Haiku + IKEA
posted by punkbitch on Feb 13, 2010 - 46 comments

Regarding the Collected Poems of William Butler Yeats

Other Yeats Links from The W.B. Yeats Society of New York. Which leads to collections of poems by and scholarly analysis of the poems of William Butler Yeats. And what have you--links to Yeats in translation in Italian, Spanish and Esperanto as well as a movie of He Wishes For the Cloths of Heaven, among other things. I was thinking of the thread here, where the Geocities site of the Collected Poems of William Butler Yeats is long gone. And these above were among what I found when I went looking for a replacement. But Poemhunter does have 427 poems of Yeats arranged in alphabetical order, so there is that. [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Feb 11, 2010 - 4 comments

"Poor Salignac! how hard a fate was thine..."

Presidents as Poets, a virtual exhibit from the Library of Congress, examines the lyrical efforts of eight American presidents, including Barack Obama's "Pop," Abraham Lincoln's "The Bear Hunt," and John Quincy Adams' Dermot MacMorrogh or the Conquest of Ireland: An Historical Tale of the Twelfth Century in Four Cantos. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Feb 10, 2010 - 22 comments

''Mumbo-Jumbo will hoo-doo you'': Vachel Lindsay reads The Congo

Vachel Lindsay reads The Congo.
Jim Dickinson reads The Congo.
Laura Fox reads The Congo.
Vachel Lindsay as Performer
Lindsay and Racism
See also Race Criticism of "The Congo"
A podcast: Noncanonical Congo: A Discussion of Vachel Lindsay's "The Congo." [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Feb 10, 2010 - 28 comments

At least it wasn't ritual disemvoweling

"Financial crisis
Stalled too many customers
CEO no more."


Sun Microsystems chief executive Jonathan Schwartz resigns via twitter haiku.
posted by Artw on Feb 4, 2010 - 62 comments

Frinds, Roomuns, coontrimun, lend me yurr eerrs.

Oy coom too berry Sayzurr, nut too preyze im. That's a reconstruction of how Brutus's famous speech from "Julius Caesar" may have sounded to Shakespeare's original audience. (Scroll down in the linked page for the rest of the speech -- or look inside this post.) If you'd like to learn more about Original Pronunciation (OP), check out www.pronouncingshakespeare.com, where you'll find several recordings by David Crystal, the scholar who probably knows most about the subject. You can also listen to this example or this NPR broadcast, first linked to in this 2005 post, here. Ben Crystal, David's son, tries some OP here. [more inside]
posted by grumblebee on Jan 28, 2010 - 34 comments

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