24 posts tagged with politics by caddis.
Displaying 1 through 24 of 24.

Related tags:
+ (586)
+ (428)
+ (400)
+ (374)
+ (249)
+ (223)
+ (197)
+ (168)
+ (168)
+ (164)
+ (162)
+ (159)
+ (156)
+ (154)
+ (153)
+ (148)
+ (133)
+ (130)
+ (115)
+ (112)
+ (110)
+ (103)
+ (103)
+ (96)
+ (94)
+ (91)
+ (89)
+ (89)
+ (87)
+ (87)
+ (87)
+ (82)
+ (79)
+ (76)
+ (74)
+ (74)
+ (74)
+ (70)
+ (69)
+ (67)
+ (67)
+ (66)
+ (65)
+ (64)
+ (57)
+ (57)
+ (56)
+ (56)
+ (56)
+ (54)
+ (53)
+ (52)
+ (52)
+ (51)
+ (50)
+ (50)
+ (49)
+ (48)
+ (48)
+ (47)


Users that often use this tag:
homunculus (137)
kliuless (90)
amberglow (88)
Postroad (58)
zarq (53)
Artw (51)
reenum (42)
owillis (41)
saulgoodman (38)
mathowie (36)
skallas (33)
East Manitoba Regi... (27)
gerryblog (26)
The Whelk (26)
semmi (25)
caddis (24)
nofundy (23)
psmealey (22)
Rhaomi (22)
goodnewsfortheinsane (21)
XQUZYPHYR (20)
troutfishing (20)
aaron (19)
four panels (19)
Gyan (19)
shivohum (19)
specialk420 (18)
Pretty_Generic (18)
Rastafari (17)
mek (17)
scalefree (17)
MiguelCardoso (16)
y2karl (16)
tranquileye (15)
acrobat (15)
Tlogmer (14)
nthdegx (14)
digaman (14)
adamvasco (14)
Effigy2000 (14)
Pope Guilty (14)
fearfulsymmetry (14)
alms (13)
thedailygrowl (13)
bardic (13)
furiousxgeorge (13)
holgate (12)
matteo (12)
dejah420 (12)
Ignatius J. Reilly (12)
infini (12)
marienbad (12)
tiaka (11)
baylink (11)
jpoulos (11)
blue_beetle (11)
daksya (11)
roomthreeseventeen (11)
snakey (10)
insomnia_lj (10)

StubHub Data

Baseball or Football? How Your Sports Choices ... Reveal your Politics. StubHub crunched their ticket data and found that baseball states tend to vote blue and football states tend to vote red. [via PostRoad's very excellent linkblog (nsfw)]
posted by caddis on Oct 12, 2012 - 51 comments

 

“A Republic, if You Can Keep It”

"[T]he corrupting influence of money is the first problem facing this nation. That unless we solve this problem, we won’t solve anything else... The Framers, Lessig says, had just one kind of dependence in mind for members of Congress: a dependence on the people. He quotes The Federalist (the then-anonymous essays by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay that are often used as a contemporary account of the Framers’ intentions) to make this point: number 52 describes the House of Representatives as that “branch of the federal government which ought to be dependent on the people alone” (emphasis added). But in the last two decades, Lessig writes, members of Congress have developed a fearsome dependency: campaign cash. The total amount spent on campaigns by all candidates for Congress in 2010 was $1.8 billion. Fundraising has become a way of life..." (via 3 Quarks Daily)
posted by caddis on Aug 1, 2012 - 48 comments

Opinions on health care reform, taxes, and even the president’s dog come down to racial bias

It all comes down to race. Michael Tesler, expanding upon the research of his mentor David Sears, has found racial bias to be a strong indicator of people's opinions on a myriad of political and other issues. The effect extended even to issues that normally would be the most stable and to opinions that would seem divorced from politics. [more inside]
posted by caddis on Jun 2, 2012 - 34 comments

US Voters Grossly Misinformed

Misinformation and the 2010 Election - A Study of the US Electorate. The key findings of the study are:

1. Perceptions of Misleading and False Information An overwhelming majority of voters said that they encountered misleading or false information in the last election, with a majority saying that this occurred frequently and occurred more frequently than usual.

2. Evidence of Misinformation Among Voters The poll found strong evidence that voters were substantially misinformed on many of the issues prominent in the election campaign, including the stimulus legislation, the healthcare reform law, TARP, the state of the economy, climate change, campaign contributions by the US Chamber of Commerce and President Obama’s birthplace. In particular, voters had perceptions about the expert opinion of economists and other scientists that were quite different from actual expert opinion.
[more inside]
posted by caddis on Dec 19, 2010 - 53 comments

The base of the base of the Democratic Party.

Are teacher's unions the enemy of reform? DISCUSS The Teacher's Union's Last Stand. How President Obama’s Race to the Top could revolutionize public education.
posted by caddis on May 22, 2010 - 128 comments

The Internet dies a little bit

Goodbye alt.* Andrew Cuomo claimed that his office found child porn on 88 newsgroups--out of roughly 100,000 newsgroups that exist. In a press release, he took credit for [Verizon's] blunderbuss-style newsgroup removal by saying: "We are attacking this problem by working with Internet service providers...I commend the companies that have stepped up today to embrace a new standard of responsibility, which should serve as a model for the entire industry." Verizon eliminates the entire alt. subset of usenet. Today, the alt.* hierarchy is by far the most populous on Usenet.
posted by caddis on Jun 12, 2008 - 143 comments

One for the History Books

Obama's Gettysburg Address. Today we saw and heard a preview of our brightest possible American future in Senator Barack Obama's glorious speech. This, then, is what it means to be presidential. To be moral. To have a real center. To speak honestly, from the heart, for the benefit of all. If there was any doubt about what we have missed in the anti-intellectual, ruthlessly incurious Bush years, and even the slippery Clinton ones (the years of "what is is"), those doubts were laid to rest by Barack Obama's magisterial speech today. A speech in which he distanced himself from a flawed father figure, Reverend Wright, and did so with almost Shakespearian dignity and honor. One of the most important speeches on race in decades if not longer. (text) [more inside]
posted by caddis on Mar 18, 2008 - 1126 comments

Obama and his supporters are just pure emotion.....

Derrick Ashong A camera-wielding interviewer collars Mr Ashong in the street and starts to pepper him with questions. The interviewer assumes that his victim's casual appearance—he is wearing a baseball hat, a shell necklace and is chewing gum—betokens an equally casual approach to politics. “Do you have any specifics?” he demands aggressively. “What are their policies?” Mr Ashong delivers a series of carefully argued replies that could form the basis of an editorial in a serious newspaper. Emotional responses count too.
posted by caddis on Mar 4, 2008 - 26 comments

McCain's extraterritorial birth

Is John McCain eligible to become president of the U.S.? He was born on a military base in the Panama Canal zone, which was not sovereign US territory. The Constitution provides:No person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty-five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States. Is McCain a natural born citizen?
posted by caddis on Feb 28, 2008 - 217 comments

Linux in '08

Is the next President of the United States running Linux? The Democrats love open source and the Republicans love Microsoft.
posted by caddis on Jul 5, 2007 - 41 comments

2008, not 1984

Vote different. Unauthorized Internet ad for Obama converts Apple Computer's '84 Super Bowl spot into a generational howl against Clinton's presidential bid. more
posted by caddis on Mar 18, 2007 - 98 comments

Protect our freedom

Freedom River, a parable as told by Orson Welles. (youtube) (via Andrew Sullivan)
posted by caddis on Dec 3, 2006 - 6 comments

Socially liberal, economically conservative

Libertarians, the forgotten voters (pdf) For those on the trail of the elusive swing voter, it may be most notable that the libertarian vote shifted sharply in 2004. Libertarians preferred George W. Bush over Al Gore by 72 to 20 percent, but Bush’s margin dropped in 2004 to 59-38 over John Kerry. Congressional voting showed a similar swing from 2002 to 2004. Libertarians apparently became disillusioned with Republican overspending, social intolerance, civil liberties infringements, and the floundering war in Iraq. If that trend continues into 2006 and 2008, Republicans will lose elections they would otherwise win. (via Andrew Sullivan)
posted by caddis on Oct 12, 2006 - 197 comments

I have taken shelter in the ridiculous

Satire [M]y father, temperamentally a gentle person, is often filled with rage. The news does this to him . . . . I have found a way not to be angry at all. I have taken shelter in the ridiculous.
posted by caddis on Sep 16, 2006 - 31 comments

More Gore

Gore in '08? Several weeks ago, former Vice President Al Gore told the Associated Press that he “had no plans to seek the Presidency in 2008.” His words were eerily reminiscent of a quote from another former Vice President, Richard Nixon, who told the same Associated Press in November of 1965 that he “had no plans to seek the Presidency in 1968.”
posted by caddis on Feb 22, 2006 - 212 comments

The Trouble with Neocons

A lapsed neocon speaks out: The problem with neoconservatism's agenda lies not in its ends, which are as American as apple pie, but rather in the overmilitarized means by which it has sought to accomplish them.... After the fall of the Soviet Union, various neoconservative authors like Charles Krauthammer, William Kristol and Robert Kagan suggested that the United States would use its margin of power to exert a kind of "benevolent hegemony" over the rest of the world, fixing problems like rogue states with W.M.D., human rights abuses and terrorist threats as they came up. Writing before the Iraq war, Kristol and Kagan considered whether this posture would provoke resistance from the rest of the world, and concluded, "It is precisely because American foreign policy is infused with an unusually high degree of morality that other nations find they have less to fear from its otherwise daunting power." ... We are fighting hot counterinsurgency wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and against the international jihadist movement, wars in which we need to prevail. But "war" is the wrong metaphor for the broader struggle, since wars are fought at full intensity and have clear beginnings and endings. Meeting the jihadist challenge is more of a "long, twilight struggle" whose core is not a military campaign but a political contest for the hearts and minds of ordinary Muslims around the world.
posted by caddis on Feb 18, 2006 - 57 comments

Term limits are so 1992.

Now, even congressmen get in on abusing Wikipedia. Marty Meehan's staffers admit editing out negative information about the congressman from his Wikipedia entry. According to the article, Rep. Meehan is not the only politician toying with the Wikipedia.
posted by caddis on Jan 29, 2006 - 15 comments

Seeing the other side

Why does the Supreme Court Make Justices More Liberal? Does it? If so, why, and why more liberal not more conservative?
posted by caddis on Jan 12, 2006 - 61 comments

Tax and Spend Conservatives

Tax and Spend Conservatives. President George W. Bush and the current administration have now borrowed more money from foreign governments and banks than the previous 42 U.S. presidents combined. Wow.
posted by caddis on Nov 9, 2005 - 42 comments

The people in my neighborhood

These are the people in my neighborhood. Oh they treat me good, since I left Hollywood. Come meet the people in my neighborhood. They're conservatives that I call for anything at all. [brought to you by the letter M]
posted by caddis on Nov 3, 2005 - 15 comments

What's the Matter with What's the Matter with Kansas

What's the Matter with What's the Matter with Kansas (pdf) Has the white working class abandoned the Democratic Party? No. . . . Has the white working class become more conservative? No. . . . Do working class “moral values” trump economics? No. . . . Are religious voters distracted from economic issues? No. An analysis by Larry Bartels, a professor at Princeton of "What's the Matter with Kansas" (previously discussed here). Lots of good survey data about this issue.
posted by caddis on Sep 29, 2005 - 66 comments

Dirty (baker's) dozen

Beyond DeLay: The 13 Most Corrupt Members of Congress. CREW (Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington) has released a report detailing the dirty business of many members of Congress.
posted by caddis on Sep 27, 2005 - 57 comments

Pesky Greens

Attack Nader early and often to prevent the Greens from throwing another election into the hands of the Republicans. Michael Tomasky in the American Prospect argues that Howard Dean is the man who can best profit from this technique. Will Nader give us four more years of GW? He makes a good point that the Green Party would get more results from working within the Democratic Party than from essentially attacking it like they did in 2000.
posted by caddis on Jul 30, 2003 - 77 comments

K street antics

Welcome to the Machine This article in the Washington Monthly describes a long term project of the Republican party to change the largely bipartisan nature of K street lobbying firms and install Republican thought leaders. In return for political benefits to the lobbyists clients, the lobbyists and their clients are expected to play nice with the Republicans on other issues. K Street has been a moderating influence against drastic change, as some constituent always objects. Under this new right-wing symbiotic relationship, individual interests are somewhat subordinated to the right-wing agenda. One of the more fascinating aspects is how it dramatically improves Republican fundraising; for instance:"For years, conservatives have been pushing to divert part of Social Security into private investment accounts. Such a move, GOP operatives argued, would provide millions of new customers and potentially trillions of dollars to the mutual fund industry that would manage the private accounts. The profits earned would, of course, be shared with the GOP in the form of campaign contributions. In other words, by sluicing the funds collected by the federal government's largest social insurance program through businesses loyal to the GOP, the party would instantly convert the crown jewels of Democratic governance into a pillar of the new Republican machine. " Of course the whole premise of this system rests upon continued Republican control. If the Democrats can wrest back control of the House and Senate, or install another strong president some of these lobbyists and their constituents will likely find themselves closed out of the process. Oh what a lovely way to govern. (via The Filibuster)
posted by caddis on Jun 29, 2003 - 30 comments

Page: 1