Join 3,512 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

2 posts tagged with pop by netbros.
Displaying 1 through 2 of 2.

Related tags:
+ (224)
+ (54)
+ (27)
+ (21)
+ (20)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (4)
+ (4)


Users that often use this tag:
The Whelk (19)
Rory Marinich (9)
rollick (9)
Kattullus (9)
klangklangston (7)
Artw (7)
zarq (7)
ludwig_van (7)
filthy light thief (6)
Charlemagne In Swe... (5)
reenum (4)
KevinSkomsvold (3)
Miko (3)
Potomac Avenue (3)
joseph conrad is f... (3)
mathowie (3)
Lovecraft In Brooklyn (3)
puny human (3)
estlin (2)
MattMangels (2)
Chinese Jet Pilot (2)
Navelgazer (2)
Blazecock Pileon (2)
philip-random (2)
LSK (2)
Lutoslawski (2)
not_on_display (2)
fearfulsymmetry (2)
flatluigi (2)
unliteral (2)
ford and the prefects (2)
Devils Rancher (2)
vronsky (2)
BoringPostcards (2)
sleepy pete (2)
four panels (2)
scody (2)
jack_mo (2)
nthdegx (2)
netbros (2)
Steven Den Beste (2)

Because Pop Rocks

In 1989, Hollywood heavy metal band Rock Sugar was stranded on a desert island. For the last twenty years, the only music they had to listen to was the 80's pop CD collection of a 13 year old girl. And now, Rock Sugar has come home. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Feb 15, 2010 - 46 comments

Painting From History

Tomokazu Matsuyama was born in Japan. He moved to the US when he was around ten years old, not speaking any English, and being overwhelmed by the culture shock of 1980s Los Angeles. His artistic work is a reflection of this upbringing. Matsuyama’s paintings envision traditional Japanese imagery through the lens of American pop art, creating a unique and beautiful hybrid. He strives to portray this global melee through a conscious “appropriation” of all of his influences: cultural, artistic, and personal. Matsuyama’s unconflicted and positively ebullient works do not ask, “What am I?,” but assert, “I am everybody.” (via) [more inside]
posted by netbros on Nov 29, 2009 - 14 comments

Page: 1