620 posts tagged with psychology.
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Things That Make You Go HURRRGGGHH

Do recipes for moist cakes make your skin clammy? Did that article about hardscrabble pugilists leave you nauseated? Do you feel super-embarrassed (YT) when you have to say completely innocent words like onus or cunning or bean curd out loud? Or even in writing? If so, you are far from alone! Word aversion, or logomisia, is an extremely common phenomenon that affects up to one in five (links to PDF) of us, and it's extremely contagious. [more inside]
posted by jake on Aug 28, 2015 - 219 comments

"Torture good, videogames bad" -- APA

In 2013, 230 researchers signed an open letter condemning the American Psychological Association's public stance on video game violence, which they say ignores all the evidence against claims that video game violence causes real violence. (Via RPS) [more inside]
posted by grobstein on Aug 18, 2015 - 81 comments

Fifty psychological and psychiatric terms to avoid

From Frontiers in Psychology, a list of inaccurate, misleading, misused, ambiguous, and logically confused words and phrases. "The goal of this article is to promote clear thinking and clear writing among students and teachers of psychological science by curbing terminological misinformation and confusion. To this end, we present a provisional list of 50 commonly used terms in psychology, psychiatry, and allied fields that should be avoided, or at most used sparingly and with explicit caveats."
posted by Pyrogenesis on Aug 6, 2015 - 48 comments

A late summer dive into the self

Personality, and a whole lot more. August always stirs up memories of going back to school for me. This year, I've been scratching the academic itch with some fine online classwork by the University of Toronto's Jordan B. Peterson. If you like Jung, Freud, Personality you might find his youtube channel a profitable place to hang out. [more inside]
posted by mrdaneri on Jul 31, 2015 - 8 comments

The Worlds Leading Seller of Hugs

Herbalife is an MLM company that its detractors believe is nothing more than a pyramid scheme. But, John Hempton manager of Bronte Capital disagrees. In a long post he sets out why "it is the stock in the portfolio I am most proud to own. It is also the stock about whose long-term prospects I am most bullish."

20,000 words of economic analysis sounds a dry read. But think again, exploring the economics of this one peculiar company is a rabbit hole of fascinating portraits on globalisation, psychology and everyday life around the world.
posted by Another Fine Product From The Nonsense Factory on Jul 28, 2015 - 54 comments

What is thy name?

"Humans as Superorganisms: How Microbes, Viruses, Imprinted Genes and Other Selfish Entities Shape Our Behavior" by Peter Kramer and Paola Bressan discusses the idea that an individual homo sapiens is only one component of the human superorganism we call a person, focusing on the psychological and psychiatric ramifications thereof. (Paola Bressan previously.)
posted by save alive nothing that breatheth on Jul 27, 2015 - 17 comments

Cargo cult of personality

The IBM Watson Personality Insights service uses linguistic analytics to extract a spectrum of cognitive and social characteristics from the text data that a person generates through blogs, tweets, forum posts, and more. Just enter a chunk of text with at least 100 recognized words and Watson will break down your (or Hitler's or Donald Trump's) personality compared to other participants. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 27, 2015 - 80 comments

Pareidolia, Hypervigilance, and the Uncanny Valley - You Know, For Kids!

The History (and Psychology) of Creepy Dolls [more inside]
posted by Miko on Jul 23, 2015 - 17 comments

What If Everything You Knew About Disciplining Kids Was Wrong?

Teachers and administrators still rely overwhelmingly on outdated systems of reward and punishment, using everything from red-yellow-green cards, behavior charts, and prizes to suspensions and expulsions. [... ] But consequences have consequences. Contemporary psychological studies suggest that, far from resolving children's behavior problems, these standard disciplinary methods often exacerbate them. They sacrifice long-term goals (student behavior improving for good) for short-term gain—momentary peace in the classroom. What If Everything You Knew About Disciplining Kids Was Wrong?
posted by desjardins on Jul 8, 2015 - 53 comments

$3,000 worth of "gems"...

Gaming Your Brain - How to top the leaderboard of Clash of Clans, and how Freemium games rake in billions of dollars from their players.
posted by Artw on Jun 22, 2015 - 77 comments

The Narcissist as Sensitive Introvert

By this point, you're probably wondering if you're secretly a hypersensitive covert narcissist masquerading as a sensitive introvert. Without further ado, here are 23 items that will allow you to gain greater insight into your personality.
posted by the hot hot side of randy on Jun 5, 2015 - 64 comments

Consciousness Began When the Gods Stopped Speaking

How Julian Jaynes’ famous 1970s theory is faring in the neuroscience age.
The picture Jaynes paints is that consciousness is only a very thin rime of ice atop a sea of habit, instinct, or some other process that is capable of taking care of much more than we tend to give it credit for. “If our reasonings have been correct,” he writes, “it is perfectly possible that there could have existed a race of men who spoke, judged, reasoned, solved problems, indeed did most of the things that we do, but were not conscious at all.”
[more inside]
posted by modernserf on May 28, 2015 - 73 comments

The Simple Logical Puzzle That Shows How Illogical People Are

In the 1960s, the English psychologist Peter Wason devised an experiment that would revolutionize his field.
posted by boo_radley on May 22, 2015 - 98 comments

The Startup That Wants to Cure Social Anxiety

Joyable’s website, full of affable sans serifs and cheery salmon rectangles, looks Pinterest-esque, at least in its design. Except its text didn’t discuss eye glasses or home decor but “evidence-based” methods shown to reduce social anxiety. I knew those phrases: “Evidence-based” is the watchword of cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, the treatment now considered most effective for certain anxiety disorders. Joyable dresses a psychologists’s pitch in a Bay Area startup’s clothes.

posted by ellieBOA on May 18, 2015 - 47 comments

The Mandela Effect and The Berenstein Bears Switcheroo

As it turns out, the name has never changed. They have always been the Berenstain Bears. Every physical book I had ever seen had said "Berenstain Bears". I have always been wrong. Every scrap of physical evidence proves me wrong. [more inside]
posted by Foci for Analysis on May 15, 2015 - 214 comments

taking the dolls' perspective

Improving Your Spatial IQ Can Lift Your Social IQ The finding: People with strong social skills are better at seeing other people’s perspectives—literally. [more inside]
posted by wonton endangerment on May 10, 2015 - 10 comments

"Uncertainty itself can lead to a lot of distress for humans"

So says Dan Grupe in this article about Emily 'Dear Prudence' Yoffe, anxiety and the stress of not knowing.
posted by averysmallcat on Mar 23, 2015 - 4 comments

BASP+NHSTP=0

Academic journal bans p-value significance test An editorial published in the academic journal Basic and Applied Social Psychology (BASP) has declared that the null hypothesis significance testing procedure (NHSTP) is 'invalid', and have banned it from future papers submitted to the journal. [more inside]
posted by MisantropicPainforest on Mar 19, 2015 - 59 comments

"If you want to feel bad about your looks, spend some time in Seoul."

Why is South Korea the world’s plastic-surgery capital? [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 18, 2015 - 46 comments

It's not about the food—it's about your surroundings.

This Fast-Food-Loving, Organics-Hating Ivy League Prof Will Trick You Into Eating Better: Mother Jones on food psychologist Brian Wansink's work with restaurants, grocery stores, and schools on how to encourage better eating.
posted by Stacey on Mar 16, 2015 - 105 comments

Gresham College lectures

Gresham College has provided free public talks within the City of London for over 400 years.’ ‘Since 2001, the college has been recording its lectures and releasing them online in what is now an archive of over 1,000’ of them. Some examples: Snails in Art and the Art of Snails; The History of the Bowler Hat; “Speaking Scars” - The Tattoo; Mother Green Tree Frog and her Children: How Folktales Contributed to the Confucianisation of Korea; The Psychology of Doing Nothing; Möbius and his Band; Harmony in the Lowest Home: The Guitar and the Labouring Poor. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Feb 25, 2015 - 3 comments

The Truth is IN there

The real you Your conscious self evaluation is often different from your underlying implicit reactions in this Psych' study at Harvard that tries to reveal ones prejudices and preconceived biases. [more inside]
posted by naight on Feb 22, 2015 - 17 comments

The Landmark Forum: 42 Hours, $500, 65 Breakdowns

My lost weekend with the trademark happy, bathroom-break hating, slightly spooky inheritors of est. (Previously, previously, previously).
posted by shivohum on Feb 17, 2015 - 99 comments

Science meets professional subjects

Amazon's Mechanical Turk has become an important tool for social science research, but a fascinating piece by PBS Newshour discusses why this might be a problem, with a great profile of professional survey takers, who average hundreds, even thousands of social science surveys each. This is not just idle speculation, recent research [PDF] shows that experienced Turkers no longer have typical "gut reactions" to social experiments, creating a struggle with how to deal with non-naivete [PDF]. Take a look at the questions that professional Tukers are asked the most, and be sure to take the survey in the middle of the first article! [more inside]
posted by blahblahblah on Feb 16, 2015 - 46 comments

The sun was warm but the wind was chill

Wind chill is vitally important information. Or is it a meaningless number useful only in making weather forecasts more dramatic? [more inside]
posted by sfenders on Feb 16, 2015 - 55 comments

Open Mind - a philosophy and cognitive science resource

Open Mind - "This is a website with numerous peer-reviewed philosophical texts covering a wide range of topics and disciplines that are available for free. This means that the texts are not restricted to the use of academics and students in the developed world who can afford to download them, but are available to anyone, anywhere." [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Feb 15, 2015 - 9 comments

I'll eat you up, I love you so

Shortly after meeting my wife, she introduced me to the nuanced meaning that the Spanish word nervio had acquired in the lexicon of her family. As used in their Chilean home, the word could be defined as a feeling of such intense affection that one trembles or grits his teeth with restraint so as not to harm the object of his affection. I have heard others allude to the sensation in seemingly bizarre phrases such as, "It's so cute [that] I want to squeeze it to death." I often ask people about nervio. For those like me who have experienced it frequently throughout their lives, a complete definition is unnecessary and the word fills a void in their vocabulary. With others, my description is often greeted with bewilderment. Having never felt such a sensation, it is hard for them to imagine.
More? Tagalog's gigil, corporal cuddling, and some scientific insights into the "cute aggression" phenomenon
posted by Rhaomi on Feb 14, 2015 - 67 comments

Social Identity Threat Motivates Science-Discrediting Online Comments

"Another simple pseudo-scientist who gets a pat on the back for finding what he was looking for. No subtle thinking here. No qualifying or consideration of alternate interpretation. No honest presentation of the limits of your study. No alternative explanations. This is why the majority of social scientists are flimsy. It is a weak science desperately pretend[sic] it has hard evidence for complex phenomena." [more inside]
posted by Made of Star Stuff on Feb 7, 2015 - 62 comments

"My psychological time had compressed by a factor of two."

Cabinet Magazine interviews Michel Siffre, whose work helped found the field of human chronobiology. He spent months isolated in a subterranean cave, with no clock, calendar, or sun. He slept and ate only when his body told him to.
posted by artsandsci on Jan 31, 2015 - 48 comments

"If ASMR has a godfather, it is television painter Bob Ross."

How a bunch of YouTubers discovered a tingling sensation nobody knew existed.
posted by artsandsci on Jan 27, 2015 - 121 comments

Why do employers care about grades and diplomas?

The Magic of Education
posted by christonabike on Jan 15, 2015 - 60 comments

Indifference is a power

Why Stoicism is one of the best mind-hacks ever. "As legions of warriors and prisoners can attest, Stoicism is not grim resolve but a way to wrest happiness from adversity." [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Jan 2, 2015 - 70 comments

Everyone is poised to attack anyone. But it's all a joke.

How Chan-Style Anonymous Culture Shapes #gamergate Twitter user A Man In Black attempts to untangle the gamergater mindset using identity -- any identity as vice, and lack of identity as a chief virtue.
posted by boo_radley on Dec 16, 2014 - 212 comments

"Not all anxiety is created equal."

9 things I wish people understood about anxiety. [more inside]
posted by ourt on Dec 4, 2014 - 59 comments

There are no legitimate authorities anywhere.

Meet the most frightening author of the twentieth century. And I don't mean Stephen King or Clive Barker. Who needs Pennywise the Clown or Mamoulian when all you have to do is look in the mirror and realize that under the right circumstances, you'd make a good Nazi? All you need is an authority you trust to give you the right orders. [more inside]
posted by starbreaker on Dec 4, 2014 - 28 comments

Speculative questions from research into mental illness

Could depression be an infectious disease? Might hallucinogenic mushrooms be an effective treatment for depression (New York Times link)? Do antipsychotic drugs hinder long-term recovery from episodes of schizophrenia?
posted by alex1965 on Nov 30, 2014 - 49 comments

hyperconnected: your brain on shrooms

How Tripping On Mushrooms Changes The Brain - "New research [pdf] suggests that psilocybin, the main psychoactive ingredient in magic mushrooms, sprouts new links across previously disconnected brain regions, temporarily altering the brain's entire organizational framework." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Nov 28, 2014 - 84 comments

Women in Academic Science: A Changing Landscape

A new paper in the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest Provides a detailed and comprehensive look at the gender gap between men and women in academic science.

Their (surprisingly optimistic?) conclusion?: Barriers to women’s full participation in mathematically intensive academic science fields are rooted in pre-college factors and the subsequent likelihood of majoring in these fields, and future research should focus on these barriers rather than misdirecting attention toward historical barriers that no longer account for women’s underrepresentation in academic science.
posted by Another Fine Product From The Nonsense Factory on Nov 21, 2014 - 50 comments

Who is Barack Obama?

How might President Obama's leadership style be rooted in his psychology? Psychoanalysts Nasir Ghaemi, Samuel Barondes, and Justin Frank venture opinions, and writer Robert Merry applies a framework from political psychology. (psychoanalyst Drew Westen, previously)
posted by shivohum on Nov 7, 2014 - 17 comments

The fault is not in our stars, but in our bladders

The Philosophical Implications of the Urge to Urinate: Our Sense Of Free Will Diminishes When We Need To Pee Or Desire Sex.
posted by homunculus on Nov 5, 2014 - 33 comments

The Rise of Fundamentalism

Mark Manson (previously) discussing how rising population, inequal distribution of technology and resources rapidly changing, and various political and environmental stresses combine to create a psychology ripe for fundamentalist belief. [more inside]
posted by thebotanyofsouls on Nov 3, 2014 - 51 comments

Diversity within us comes out better when there's diversity in our team.

The most recent episode of the Ruby Rogues podcast — #179 Accountability and Diversity with Meagan Waller — is a treasure trove of insights and info about unconscious biases, diversity, employment, culture, tech, and more. The podcast page features a timestamped topic outline of the discussion, as well as many links to the Ruby community websites, projects, studies, conferences, and controversies they discuss… [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Nov 3, 2014 - 5 comments

You are not alone (trigger warning - sexual abuse)

[Trigger warning] 10 Things No One Ever Told You About Life After Sexual Abuse by Dr Nina Burrowes (Buzzfeed). Illustrations by Nina Burrowes, Katie Green, and Jade Sarson.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 1, 2014 - 23 comments

The Secret Lives of the Mentally Ill

In a Slate Article by David Rosenberg, side-by-side images and descriptions illustrate the "dual lives" of those coping with mental illness.
posted by ourt on Oct 30, 2014 - 21 comments

Age ain't nothing but a number

One day in the fall of 1981, eight men in their 70s stepped out of a van in front of a converted monastery in New Hampshire. They shuffled forward, a few of them arthritically stooped, a couple with canes. Then they passed through the door and entered a time warp. Perry Como crooned on a vintage radio. Ed Sullivan welcomed guests on a black-and-white TV. Everything inside — including the books on the shelves and the magazines lying around — were designed to conjure 1959. This was to be the men’s home for five days as they participated in a radical experiment, cooked up by a young psychologist named Ellen Langer.
posted by ellieBOA on Oct 30, 2014 - 25 comments

The trouble with ignorance is that it feels so much like expertise

David Dunning, professor of psychology at Cornell, writes for the Pacific Magazine on how confidence and incompetence often go hand in hand: We Are All Confident Idiots
posted by tykky on Oct 28, 2014 - 74 comments

Face-ism Exists

Are you an introvert or an extrovert? Your face can visibly answer this question, a Carnegie Mellon University professor argues.
posted by ourt on Oct 26, 2014 - 43 comments

a.k.a. the sky is falling and the Boogeyman is chasing me

Chapman University has released The Chapman Survey on American Fears, a comprehensive, scientific survey of 1500 Americans on what they fear the most. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 24, 2014 - 31 comments

"So no I don't always believe them and yeah I let them know that."

While working within the Chicago Police Department, Rebecca Campbell (PhD, Professor, Michigan State University) was told by a detective that "most victims lie" about sexual assault. She, on the other hand, was certain that most victims told the truth. Wondering how both she and the detective could be so certain, she began to do the research to find out. Her work examines how the legal and medical and mental health systems respond to the needs of adult, adolescent and pediatric victims of sexual assault. [Warning for graphic descriptions of assaults] [more inside]
posted by VioletU on Oct 24, 2014 - 49 comments

Pay Any Price

The APA Grapples with Its Torture Demons: Six Questions for Nathaniel Raymond [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 22, 2014 - 12 comments

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