673 posts tagged with psychology.
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Midlife Replication Crisis

Repeat After Me: Psychology's Reproducibility Problem a comic by Maki Naro
posted by Potomac Avenue on Oct 6, 2016 - 33 comments

The Wisdom of Children

Guy asks his daughter about how to overcome fearful things through the use of "Fear Doors".
posted by Foci for Analysis on Sep 18, 2016 - 26 comments

Moving The Window of Acceptability

How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language. Studies show that the way we think about moral questions is subtly influenced by the language we're using at the time. People using a non-native language tend to be more cerebral and less emotional. What does this say about the concept of the moral center, or "just knowing" what's right and what's wrong?
posted by Kevin Street on Sep 15, 2016 - 12 comments

Dataism: Getting out of the 'job loop' and into the 'knowledge loop'

From deities to data - "For thousands of years humans believed that authority came from the gods. Then, during the modern era, humanism gradually shifted authority from deities to people... Now, a fresh shift is taking place. Just as divine authority was legitimised by religious mythologies, and human authority was legitimised by humanist ideologies, so high-tech gurus and Silicon Valley prophets are creating a new universal narrative that legitimises the authority of algorithms and Big Data." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Sep 7, 2016 - 45 comments

The Drug of Choice for the Age of Kale

The Drug of Choice for the Age of Kale: Ariel Levy, writing for the New Yorker, looks into ayahuasca as a newly trendy experience in Brooklyn and Silicon Valley. She then experiences it herself with some millennials in a Brooklyn studio (a "windowless vomitorium"). [more inside]
posted by witchen on Sep 7, 2016 - 84 comments

Living on the Borderline

When insolent kids and women are the only ones pathologized for throwing temper tantrums as opposed to violent behavior, then the discourse is suspect. [more inside]
posted by Dressed to Kill on Sep 2, 2016 - 40 comments

Sad Face

Can smiling make you happier? Maybe not. We have no idea. ... The basic finding of Strack’s research—that a facial expression can change your feelings even if you don’t know that you’re making it—has now been reproduced, at least conceptually, many, many times. ... In recent years, it has even formed the basis for the treatment of mental illness. An idea that Strack himself had scoffed at in the 1980s now is taken very seriously: Several recent, randomized clinical trials found that injecting patients’ faces with Botox to make their “frown lines” go away also helped them to recover from depression. [more inside]
posted by Bella Donna on Aug 29, 2016 - 19 comments

Everything is Fucked: The Syllabus

PSY 607: Everything is Fucked. What does it mean, in science, for something to be fucked? Fucked needs to mean more than that something is complicated or must be undertaken with thought and care, as that would be trivially true of everything in science. In this class we will go a step further and say that something is fucked if it presents hard conceptual challenges to which implementable, real-world solutions for working scientists are either not available or routinely ignored in practice. [more inside]
posted by srboisvert on Aug 12, 2016 - 14 comments

Humanity has always embraced household gods

“Pray for Kumamoto & Kumamon" What is cute? Specifically, what is kawaii? A long read exploration, ranging from earthquakes to mayonnaise and Satan. [more inside]
posted by doctornemo on Jul 20, 2016 - 16 comments

Why 'Tough' Treatment Doesn't Help Drug Addicts

Maia Szalavitz [mefi's own maias] talks about her new book, Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction on Fresh Air with Terry Gross (transcript) - "We have this idea that if we are just cruel enough and mean enough and tough enough to people with addiction, that they will suddenly wake up and stop, and that is not the case."
posted by kliuless on Jul 11, 2016 - 55 comments

Psychology of Fighting: Before, During, and After

This Is Your Brain On War: “There was this police officer in Florida,” he says. “She was shot 10 times, and in the middle of this gunfight she says to herself, ‘I’m getting married in six months and you’re not going to stop me.’ And she killed the two bastards who shot her. She was back on the job a year later. So, yes, these are irrational thoughts, but at the same time, they’re motivating thoughts.”
posted by scaryblackdeath on Jun 22, 2016 - 9 comments

16 year-old-me would probably be disappointed w/39 year-old me

The secret of taste: why we like what we like (slTheGuardianlongread)
posted by Kitteh on Jun 22, 2016 - 55 comments

I'm not crazy, you are!

Oops. In 2012 a study was published that linked liberalism with social desirability, and conservatism with psychosis. A series of papers were published, some in high profile outlets. Now, they have been retracted. Why? The codings in the data were reversed--liberals were coded as conservatives, and vice-versa. [more inside]
posted by MisantropicPainforest on Jun 11, 2016 - 34 comments

Sapiens 2.0: Homo Deus?

In his follow-up to Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari envisions what a 'useless class' of humans might look like as AI advances and spreads - "I'm aware that these kinds of forecasts have been around for at least 200 years, from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, and they never came true so far. It's basically the boy who cried wolf, but in the original story of the boy who cried wolf, in the end, the wolf actually comes, and I think that is true this time." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on May 24, 2016 - 23 comments

Where does technology exploit our minds weaknesses?

How Technology Hijacks People’s Minds — from a Magician and Google’s Design Ethicist (Medium, 12min) I learned to think this way when I was a magician. Magicians start by looking for blind spots, edges, vulnerabilities and limits of people’s perception, so they can influence what people do without them even realizing it. Once you know how to push people’s buttons, you can play them like a piano. [more inside]
posted by CrystalDave on May 20, 2016 - 33 comments

about time

Magic Mushroom Drug Lifts Depression in Human Trial - "The findings show that more research in this field is now needed. 'This is the first time that psilocybin has been investigated as a potential treatment for major depression', says lead author Dr Robin Carhart-Harris, Imperial College London."
posted by kliuless on May 18, 2016 - 51 comments

The Cure For Fear

Scientists have discovered a radical new way to treat our most traumatic memories.
posted by MythMaker on May 2, 2016 - 66 comments

How it feels to be blind in your mind

Blake Ross: "I have never visualized anything in my entire life. I can’t 'see' my father’s face or a bouncing blue ball, my childhood bedroom or the run I went on ten minutes ago. I thought 'counting sheep' was a metaphor. I’m 30 years old and I never knew a human could do any of this. And it is blowing my goddamned mind."
posted by How the runs scored on Apr 23, 2016 - 235 comments

In A Perpetual Present

The strange case of the woman who can't remember her past - and can't imagine her future.
posted by ellieBOA on Apr 19, 2016 - 20 comments

a moment-by-moment decision not to escalate

Women do what they need to do to survive. "Emergencies so often don't look like emergencies as we're taught to understand them when we are children. Monsters don't look like the monsters we've been taught to avoid." [cw: rape] [more inside]
posted by amnesia and magnets on Apr 13, 2016 - 27 comments

Losing Motivation

"You know that feeling that you got in school when you had to do some homework?" Youtuber @mpjme of FunFunFunction talks about how external motivation can mess up your inner motivation. [more inside]
posted by popcassady on Apr 11, 2016 - 12 comments

You probably can't force someone to take this test without causing drama

Here's a test to measure your need for drama.
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Apr 9, 2016 - 91 comments

Changing minds on minority rights with a single conversation, revisited

Previously on MeFi, a pair of then-graduate students, David Broockman and Joshua Kalla, uncovered that some highly-publicized research, claiming to show that brief conversations with gay canvassers could cause lasting changes in people's opinions on gay rights, was in fact fraudulent, and was based on fabricated data. However, whether or not there was in fact any grain of truth to that paper's claims remained to be seen. Recently, the same team that uncovered the fraud has published their own study, showing that canvassing can really be effective at durably increasing support for transgender rights. [more inside]
posted by en forme de poire on Apr 8, 2016 - 26 comments

Replication study fails under scrutiny

A much publicized study (previously) suggested that more than half of all psychology studies cannot be replicated. A new study finds that the replication study was full of serious mistakes and its conclusion is wrong. [more inside]
posted by hawthorne on Mar 6, 2016 - 49 comments

42 steps to conquering executive function problems (in 68 easy steps).

Step 63: Panic. All jesting aside, executive function skills are important. The ability to start new tasks, switch easily between tasks, pause before responding to something, and plan for the future all seem like small, simple things. But many people struggle painfully with them, especially when difficulty with them is treated as a personal failing. (Turns out it's more complicated than that.)
posted by sciatrix on Mar 3, 2016 - 102 comments

“To begin with I was hoping it was just a phase.”

What should we do about paedophiles? by Sophie Elmhirst [The Guardian] They have committed unspeakable crimes that demand harsh punishment. But most will eventually be set free. Are we prepared to support efforts to rehabilitate them? [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Mar 2, 2016 - 37 comments

"We think kids are so fragile. Tell them the truth. They are resilient."

Researchers have found that students who learn about famous scientists' personal and scientific struggles outperform students who only learn of those scientists' achievements. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Mar 2, 2016 - 44 comments

Electioneering on the campaign trail

Old and new data-driven efforts implicate mind control (get out the tin foil hats) [more inside]
posted by jiblets on Feb 19, 2016 - 27 comments

LSD: My Life-Saving Drug

When a freak brain hemorrhage struck out of nowhere a couple of years ago, I became a little depressed, stuck in a rut, and strangely fearful of death. So when I heard about people (in my neighborhood, even) using hallucinogens to push beyond their preoccupations, to help them live without fear, I decided that was a trip I had to take.
posted by pwally on Feb 6, 2016 - 44 comments

How does that make you feel?

CBT vs Psychoanalysis, Round 2016 [The Guardian] [more inside]
posted by facehugger on Jan 8, 2016 - 55 comments

And then one day you find ten years have got behind you

Wow -- New Year's Day again already? Didn't we just do this? Why does time seem to speed up as we get older? Brian Resnick at Vox provides some food for thought.
posted by Fuzzypumper on Jan 1, 2016 - 22 comments

From jackal to giraffe language: a workshop on nonviolent communication

Dr. Marshall Rosenberg's talk on nonviolent communication is wise, practical and surprisingly funny.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Dec 20, 2015 - 20 comments

Reflections of a sellout; how diversity would strengthen social science

José L. Duarte is one author of an upcoming paper in Behavioral and Brain Sciences, "Political Diversity Will Improve Social Psychological Science." The authors review how academic psychology has lost its former political diversity, and explore the negative consequences of this on the field's search for true and valid results. Duarte has blogged about his own experience of bias when he was denied admission to a Ph.D program, possibly for for his perceived political views in another blog post. [more inside]
posted by Rangi on Dec 16, 2015 - 24 comments

"Starving silences who you really are."

There Once Was a Girl. A work of criticism and of memoir on the false narratives surrounding anorexia in life and literature.
(Some may find the descriptions in this essay disturbing or triggering.)
posted by zarq on Dec 10, 2015 - 9 comments

These are my surprised wings.

The beverages are consumed regularly by thirty-one per cent of kids between the ages of twelve and seventeen, and by thirty-four per cent of those aged eighteen to twenty-four. U.S. sales for energy drinks and shots now total more than twelve and a half billion dollars—a number that the market-research firm Packaged Facts predicts will grow by another nine billion dollars by 2017. A new study [note: behind paywall] , published in the November issue of Health Psychology, suggests that appeals by energy-drink companies to the thrill-thirsty male id are coming at a psychological and physical cost, however. -- Rachel Giese, How Energy-Drink Companies Prey on Male Insecurities
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 3, 2015 - 42 comments

The kids are quite possibly all right on average

"[F]or a while now, think pieces have been fretting over the increased fragility of American college students, and blaming it on … well, whatever the writer thinks is wrong with kids and/or society today." What if it's just not true? [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Nov 17, 2015 - 43 comments

“I suspect ‘chess rage’ & ‘road rage’ are neighbouring neural impulses.”

An Art Without an Artwork By Tom Russell [Guernica Magazine] A summer of chess in Bryant Park.
“Another way to distinguish a great chess player from an average one is to gauge how comfortable he or she is with tension. After the opening flurry of moves it is inevitable that a tension accrue somewhere on the board—a cluster of opposing pieces all vying for control of a vital square. The temptation for most is to resolve that tension by trading off pieces and simplifying the position. Experts let it build and build, and pounce only when they identify a clear way to gain an advantage. Everything you’d want to know about a person psychologically is there to see on the chessboard.”
posted by Fizz on Nov 15, 2015 - 11 comments

Poor sleep may spur college weight gain

As the first semester of the school year reaches the halfway mark, countless college freshmen are becoming aware that their clothes are feeling rather snug. While the so-called freshman 15 may be hyperbole, studies confirm that many students do put on five to 10 pounds during that first year away from home. Now new research suggests that an underlying cause for the weight gain may be the students’ widely vacillating patterns of sleep.
posted by sciatrix on Nov 14, 2015 - 38 comments

Who do you mean by we?

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari - "The book delivers on its madly ambitious subtitle by in fact managing to cover key moments in the developmental history of humankind from the emergence of Homo Sapiens to today's developments in genetic engineering." Also btw, check out Harari on the myths we need to survive, re: fact/value distinctions and their interrelationships.
posted by kliuless on Nov 8, 2015 - 7 comments

"the TV set in my head was running constantly, never turning off."

When Daydreaming Replaces Real Life [more inside]
posted by holmesian on Nov 5, 2015 - 60 comments


A series of 55 animated vintage book graphics by Henning M. Lederer
posted by leibniz on Oct 30, 2015 - 4 comments

How to spot manipulative behavior

How to Spot Manipulation - PsychCentral
How to Pick Up on Manipulative Behavior - Basic guide from WikiHow
Are You Being Manipulated? Keys to Hidden Aggression - Good Therapy.org
Psychological Manipulation Resources - Band Back Together
Eight Ways to Spot Emotional Manipulation - cassiopaea.com
Subtly Controlling Behavior - Abuse and Relationships [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 29, 2015 - 92 comments

Mindset Revisited

Psychologist Carol Dweck (previously and previously) looks at how educators are (mis)interpreting her research on growth vs. fixed mindsets, and shares her reflections about what works and what doesn't.
posted by overeducated_alligator on Oct 26, 2015 - 5 comments

It started with bedtime. A coldness. A formality.

"Cold Little Bird," a very good and very disturbing story by Ben Marcus. [SLNYer]
posted by gottabefunky on Oct 23, 2015 - 77 comments

Macho Nachos

People prefer food in sexist packaging. Putting unhealthy food in macho masculine packaging, or healthy food in feminine-themed packaging, makes it taste nicer, and people are willing to pay more for it. According to a new paper(Direct paper link)
posted by Another Fine Product From The Nonsense Factory on Oct 22, 2015 - 80 comments

How do you get to Denmark?

Where do ‘good’ or pro-social institutions come from ? Why does the capacity for collective action and cooperative behaviour vary so much across the world today ? How do some populations transcend tribalism to form a civil society ? How do you “get to Denmark”?
posted by Another Fine Product From The Nonsense Factory on Oct 21, 2015 - 31 comments

The Library of Scott Alexandria

Scott Alexander writes a lot. He's a psychiatrist, but talks about all kinds of stuff (in his about page, he calls out cognitive science, psychology, history, politics, medicine, religion, statistics, transhumanism, corny puns, and applied eschatology). Every time I read something of his, I'm struck by how reasonable he is. Evidently, I'm not alone: his posts each attract hundreds of comments. And he gets linked here a good bit. So a long-time reader of his combed through all his writings of the past decade-or-so and assembled this best-hits list. It's going to take me several happy months to get through it.
posted by AABoyles on Oct 16, 2015 - 140 comments

What You Can Learn From Hunter-Gatherers' Sleeping Patterns

Here’s the story that people like to tell about the way we sleep: Back in the day, we got more of it. Our eyes would shut when it got dark. We’d wake up for a few hours during the night instead of snoozing for a single long block. And we’d nap during the day. Then—minor key!—modernity ruined everything. Our busy working lives put an end to afternoon naps, while lightbulbs, TV screens, and smartphones shortened our natural slumber and made it more continuous. All of this is wrong, according to Jerome Siegel at the University of California, Los Angeles. Much like the Paleo diet, it’s based on unsubstantiated assumptions about how humans used to live.
posted by sciatrix on Oct 15, 2015 - 43 comments

The master of slow-burning action.

"There’s a long and noble tradition of literary critics misunderstanding Joseph Conrad. Partly that’s because he is such a complicated, dense and fascinating writer. Far more words have been written about him than he ever wrote himself – and not everyone can get it right all the time. Especially when you throw combustible postcolonial issues into the mix." [Sam Jordison - The Guardian] [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 14, 2015 - 34 comments

Stereotype Threat, Imposter Syndrome and Stereotype Tax

How Poker Player Annie Duke Used Gender Stereotypes To Win Matches - "By the time she got to that championship game 10 years later, she had also figured out a way to make people pay, quite literally, for the stereotypes they had about her." (previously)
posted by kliuless on Oct 7, 2015 - 66 comments

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