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When she placed it in his hand, people must have seen the sparks. Neither understands what just happened to their hearts.

Canadian indie/hardcore band Fucked Up have released the first of four singles from their upcoming rock opera, David Comes To Life. The album appears to be about a man who works in a lightbulb factory and is a follow-up to their critically acclaimed The Chemistry Of Modern Life. Cryptic character bios can be found on the album's site and more information from the band can be found on their blog.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on Mar 30, 2011 - 24 comments

An Apology of Sorts...

Popular punk band Screeching Weasel has dis-banded after front man Ben Weasel punched two women at SXSW last week. Weasel offered an apology (kind of). Last night, the other four members of the band resigned. [more inside]
posted by shesdeadimalive on Mar 24, 2011 - 206 comments

Punk rock and comic books! My two favorite things!

Mitch Clem, author of the late, lamented punk comic Nothing Nice To Say, is back with Turnstile Comics. The first issue is a collaboration with Jesse "Swan" Thorson from Minneapolis punks The Slow Death and includes a 4 song EP from them. It's printed in a 7 by 7-inch square to help fit with your record collection.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on Mar 23, 2011 - 9 comments

"Steer clear of the Failed State of Third Wave Ska, son. It’s like Mogadishu, but with soul patches and trombones."

Comic Punx is a blog devoted to the (mostly hilarious) depictions of punk rock in comic books. It's by Andrew Weiss, who's main blog is Armagideon Time (home of the great Nobody's Favorites.) He's also one of the the Bureau Chiefs behind Fake AP Stylebook (previously) and runs Dateline: Silver Age (previouisly).
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on Mar 17, 2011 - 21 comments

He found the bandages inside the pen

Songwriters on Process interviews songwriters in depth about their writing process. They've talked to everyone from Brian Fallon (The Gaslight Anthem) to J.D. Cronise from The Sword. Where else can you find both Patrick Stickles from Titus Andronicus talking about Faulkner and Eric from Foxy Shazam admitting he's never read a book in his life?
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on Mar 2, 2011 - 8 comments

"Ten years too late, or five years ahead of their time?"

Fusing the energy of hardcore with the wall of sound of Detroit hard rock, Denver's The Fluid was the first non-Seattle band signed to Sub Pop Records. Particularly acclaimed for their live shows, Keith Morris of the Circle Jerks compared a performance of the five-piece to seeing the Stooges in their heyday. After breaking up in 1993, they reunited in 2008. Fluid guitarist Rick Kulwicki (who was also a founding member of Denver’s groundbreaking hardcore band the Frantix) died this week at 49. [more inside]
posted by scody on Feb 16, 2011 - 20 comments

It's all ping pong my war to me

Chinese punk you ask? No, we're not talking about heroin. This is Chinese punk. [more inside]
posted by dubusadus on Dec 21, 2010 - 27 comments

Cairo: Part II

Could punk rock save Cairo, IL? (Previously.) Maybe not. What about Reddit ? [more inside]
posted by wayland on Dec 3, 2010 - 27 comments

The reason for the season.

It’s maybe a little early yet for year’s end retrospectives, but who cares: we’ve got 157 songs, 10.5 hours, 1.12 GB of “some of the best and most notable music from 2010... covering indie, pop, rock, punk, folk, rap, R&B, soul, dance, country, modern classical, ambient and electronic music, and in many cases, hard-to-classify genre hybrids.” —Curated by FluxBlog’s own Matthew Perpetua.
posted by kipmanley on Dec 3, 2010 - 30 comments

24 Hours of Hardcore Punk

The second edition of Steven Blush's American Hardcore: A Tribal History has just been published by Feral House. Additionally, Steven has posted 911 mp3s of hardcore punk as a soundtrack for your reading.
posted by battleshipkropotkin on Dec 3, 2010 - 36 comments

Steam Punk

Captain Sensible travels on the historic Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch steam railway to Dungeness [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Oct 28, 2010 - 18 comments

rebellion and music on the west coast of Canada

Bloodied but Unbowed "... chronicles, for the first time anywhere, the late 1970's/early 1980's Vancouver punk rock scene. The documentary tells a tale of rebellion and music — a fiercely independent scene created from nothing." The full documentary can be seen here.
posted by squeak on Oct 12, 2010 - 31 comments

A collection of band flyers

"...it's probably extra easy to trace my life & interests through these galleries. They start out in Kansas (most of the early non-Lawrence/ KC ones were sent to me either by people ordering copies of my zine or by a few pals of mine who had run away to CA), and as I move around in life the bands & venues change accordingly: Kansas, Ohio, Washington DC, Kansas again, Arizona."
The Jason Willis Flyer Collection, 1981-2006
posted by nomadicink on Oct 3, 2010 - 4 comments

The story of SST Records

The story of SST Records
posted by Joe Beese on Sep 18, 2010 - 34 comments

New Wave and the New Age: a Blondie Songwriter's Mystic Trip.

Touched By Your Presence, Dear: Ex-Blondie songwriter and bassist Gary Lachman (aka "Gary Valentine") blogs (and is interviewed) about his books on Jung, Steiner, Ouspensky, and Sixties mysticism, and his time spent toiling in the fields of Crowleyana and The Gurdjieff Work.
posted by darth_tedious on Sep 14, 2010 - 20 comments

What a shame

An oral history of DIY pioneers CRASS - with details about the court battle that may soon mar 30+ years of advocacy for anarchism, permaculture, workers' rights, and free thinking. [more inside]
posted by ryanshepard on Aug 22, 2010 - 39 comments

So straight, I'm so straight.

Arguably, DC's first punk band was the father/son duo called White Boy. The two, Mr Ott and Jake Whipp (real names: James & Glenn Kowalski) self released their records on their own label, Doodly Squat. They are also known to be the first punk record owned by Minor Threat frontman Ian Mackaye. The full story of White Boy is much darker and hasn't been fully put together in the collective recollection of the band. [more inside]
posted by wcfields on Aug 6, 2010 - 6 comments

102 Alternatives to the Default Facebook Profile Picture

102 Alternatives to the Default Facebook Profile Picture.
posted by WCityMike on Jul 30, 2010 - 29 comments

...around the web, around the web....

Daft Punk's Tron Legacy Score Leaked Online Youtube user alexdaft26 has uploaded the entire soundtrack in nine films on youtube.
posted by dabitch on Jul 30, 2010 - 55 comments

I am the king of the divan!

Belgian proto-punk Plastic Bertrand fires back over allegations that he did not actually sing on his 1977 hit single Ça plane pour moi.
posted by grounded on Jul 27, 2010 - 47 comments

Not just a city in Egypt

Cairo, Illinois is mostly abandoned. It was once a thriving city of 15,000, but the Mississippi barges don't stop there anymore, and racial turmoil, including a three-year boycott of white-owned businesses that refused to hire black workers, killed the town's economy. The Cairo Project, from Southern Illinois University, is a good overview of Cairo's history and its current situation. Can punk label Plan-it-X start a rebirth by moving to Cairo and opening a coffeeshop? If it helps, there's still good barbecue.
posted by escabeche on Jun 12, 2010 - 54 comments

Over The Edge

The Wipers were a tight and catchy post-punk band founded in Portland in 1977. Today they're best known for covers by The Vivian Girls and Nirvana (Return of the Rat, and esp. D7 - studio, live 1 2 3 4). But the originals are pretty interesting too. John Peel said of their first album "Is It Real": " 'It is one of punk's great albums by perhaps the most unappreciated band of all time'." [more inside]
posted by msalt on Jun 6, 2010 - 23 comments

Not a Joke Band

Joe Pop-O-Pie led his San Francisco punk band Pop-O-Pies through countless performances of the band's "hit", an idiosyncratic cover of the Grateful Dead's Truckin'. As the 1980's closed, Joe fell off the map while his other projects went mainstream, but last month the Pop-O-Pies reunited for one more Truckin' performance.
posted by Chinese Jet Pilot on May 10, 2010 - 15 comments

How To Look Punk

How To Look Punk [PDF]. Lots of good fashion tips from 1977. Don't forget your punk alias. [via]
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on Apr 16, 2010 - 44 comments

Search and Destroy

Henry Rollins on touring with the USO, Black Flag T-Shirts, Vanity Fair and the Tea Party.
posted by Artw on Apr 6, 2010 - 50 comments

Ivan Král Vault

"I told her I only wear one sock." - Iggy Pop
Patti Smith + Lenny Kaye pondering poetry enroute to gig from airport.
Ramones CBGBs
All us musicians were broke and dreamed of getting a record deal. '75 New Year party, CBGBs
Iggy Pop on a playground turtle.
Plenty more backstage and party footage from Patti Smith group member and Iggy Pop bandmate (not to mention filmmaker and songwriter) Ivan Král in his Vault.
big thumbs up to Mr. Dante Fontana
posted by carsonb on Apr 1, 2010 - 8 comments

Female-Fronted Punk Rock

Female-Fronted Punk Rock 1977-1989. A huge, 12 (!) disc, mix of punk rock sung by women.
posted by OmieWise on Mar 12, 2010 - 43 comments

TV, When It Rocked and Rolled

In August 1990, when Spin magazine was still an edgier cousin to Rolling Stone, it published a list of the 35 Greatest Moments in Rock 'n' Roll Television. [more inside]
posted by jonp72 on Feb 17, 2010 - 49 comments

Chicago punk sound‎ architect Iain Burgess passes away

Producer/engineer Iain Burgess played a vital role in defining the Chicago punk sound in the 80's with his work with Naked Raygun, Big Black, and the Effigies. Burgess passed away on Thursday from a pulmonary embolism, a complication of the pancreatic and liver cancers he'd recently been diagnosed with. Although British, he is best known for his years in Chicago, where he helped create a distinctive large sound with a live-centered recording style and served as a mentor to Steve Albini. He also worked with Didjits, Ministry, Mega City Four, the Cows, Pegboy, Shellac, Jawbox and many others.
posted by Slack-a-gogo on Feb 12, 2010 - 36 comments

The Hanoi that Rocks will rock the world

Hanoi Rocks, Helsinki 1981. A year when they played 102 gigs, almost all in small dance halls deep in Finland. They were ready, even if their audience wasn't.[1] For british drummer Razzle, they looked like a band which he wanted to belong to.[2] In next few years they caused chaos in Bombay, got spitted upon at Wailing Wall in Jerusalem because of indecent make up and hair, went big in Japan and had good gigs in London.[3] November 1984, they were ready to conquer America. After Mike twisted his ankle on a bottle broken by Andy on stage in Syracuse, a few gigs got cancelled and instead the band accepted invitation from L.A. scene to party with Mötley Crüe. In December 9th, 1984, the party ran out of alcohol, so Vince Neil from Mötley Crüe and the drummer Razzle went to get more. The car crashed, immediatly killing Razzle. He was Dead by Christmas, and the band broke in May 1985.[4][5] [more inside]
posted by Free word order! on Dec 6, 2009 - 11 comments

Wesley Willis's Joy Rides

Wesley Willis's Joy Rides, one week only at Pitchfork TV. Dual-wielding a Technics KN and a microphone, breaking Chicago down to a vector space of magic marker; homeless busker, Napster celebrity, punk headliner and hellraiser: take your pick. The late Wesley Willis as remembered in Joy Rides.
posted by kid ichorous on Dec 4, 2009 - 33 comments

He was a friend of mine

Jim Carroll has died. Avant-garde writer, punk rocker, doped-up downtown scenester, never-made-it schoolyard hoop-dreamer. He couldn't have expected to live to see a master's thesis in English at San Diego State written about his journal/novel The Basketball Diaries, or to be interviewed by Jon Stewart about being played by Leo DiCaprio in the movie of his (early) life. [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Sep 13, 2009 - 124 comments

Pogue Mahone, ya Nipple Erectors

Shane MacGowan is the face and name most often associated with The Pogues. Unraveling Shane's psyche would require a book-length study but the crux of his identity lies somewhere in that conflict between English experience and Irish heritage. The abbreviated story of his life starts with his birth in England, but he was raised in Ireland, and moved back to England some years later. He won a scholarship to the renowned Westminster School, where he was possibly enrolled alongside Thomas Dolby and other notable people. MacGowan was involved with drugs and publicized hooliganery before being in a band, the first of which was The Nipple Erectors in 1977. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 13, 2009 - 87 comments

ART/new york

Paul Tschinkel is the producer and director of the series called ART/new york. -- After showing video pieces in New York galleries, he turned to the fledgling New York cable system (Manhattan Cable downtown and Warner Cable uptown), producing a half hour weekly arts program - a gallery on television. From 1974 to 1979 Paul Tschinkel's Inner- Tube was devoted to conceptual and narrative video art pieces. [more inside]
posted by vronsky on Aug 18, 2009 - 4 comments

They’re back! Dinosaurs! In a band! Oh shiiiiiiiit!

Made in the image of 1980s "low-brow sleeze punk" public access TV shows like T.V. Party, Rappin with The Rickster, The Richard Bey Show, the more mainstream (or at least widely available) U.S.A. Up All Night, as well as elements of Cinema of Transgression, Мишка brings forth The Creepy Touch. Not safe for work, the squeamish, or squares. (Videos inside) [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 2, 2009 - 10 comments

1983 Ilsington Squatter Punk Documentary

1983 Ilsington Squatter Punk Documentary
posted by KoobieKitten on Jun 25, 2009 - 15 comments

Now I Wanna Be Your Insightful, Respectable Rock Icon

You wouldn't expect Iggy Pop to be the poster boy for rock stars who age gracefully, but he seems to be doing a pretty good job of it. At the age of 62, he's released Preliminaires, an album steeped in French Literature and containing jazz standards, hardscrabble blues, and the Louis-Armstrong-meets-Tom-Waits hit, King of the Dogs. NPR's Fresh Air has this interview with a thoughtful, avuncular Iggy Pop
posted by Jon_Evil on Jun 2, 2009 - 53 comments

Its called Wipeout...WHY DON'T YOU SHUTUP ?

Alan Vega live... It's not Billy Idol, Elvis, or Springsteen, its just Alan Vega and "Its called Wipeout...why don't you shut up"
posted by celerystick on Jun 1, 2009 - 34 comments

CBGB's

We all know of the importance and impact that CBGB's had on the early East Coast punk scene. I could go and link to a bunch you tube videos, obituaries, and other assorted blogs about my favorite acts that had played there over the years. And while CBGB's is gone, why I don't I just let you take a virtual tour of the place.
posted by peewinkle on Apr 6, 2009 - 45 comments

black punk punks your punk

mid-70s proto-punk band, Death, have finally gotten a real disc out. unearthed in crates lost for decades, their founder dead before seeing it happen, their children never knowing the shadowy past of their forebears, the sound of black pop-punk-politi-metal-wave is finally here. [more inside]
posted by artof.mulata on Mar 29, 2009 - 16 comments

Waiting for the CTA

It's harder to be more obscure and unheralded than John Henry Timmis IV. He barely even tried to sell his own music, almost always giving copies away of his impossibly rare loner-punk 45's. Dieing in 2002, almost 15 years after his last single, from complications resulting from alcoholism, after suffering from the degenerative ear/skull disease mastoiditis-- his potential hardly tapped... until now. Film buffs may know him as the director/producer of the longest movie ever made, The Cure for Insomnia staring Lee Groban reading his same titled 4,080 page poem spliced with porn and heavy metal, clocking in at 87 hours. Virtually unknown until the song "Death Trip" appeared on an obscure bootleg punk compilation Staring Down the Barrel. Interest peaked enough for Plastic Crimewave's Secret History of Chicago Music article to have a write up on him and Drag City/Galactic Zoo to reissue his forgotten masterpiece, Cosmic Lighting. [more inside]
posted by wcfields on Mar 17, 2009 - 7 comments

This should suffice to drive the snakes out

"Two hours of Irish punk rock, new wave, underground and just plain rock-n-roll THUNDER" courtesy of Last Days of Man on Earth 2.0
posted by jtron on Mar 17, 2009 - 3 comments

No Need to Atone for Your Synths

Not all groups with synthesizers in the 1970s and 1980s were lame Top 40 acts with keytars. Some groups of the era used synths for spastic keyboard bleeps, herky-jerky tempos, and angst-ridden aggression in a style now classified by record collector geeks as synthpunk, minimal synth, or minimal wave. Several famous New Wave acts dabbled in the style before providing soundtracks for Molly Ringwald movies (OMD, Electricty) or singing about waitresses in cocktail bars (the Human League, Being Boiled), but vintage videos from synth punk acts all over the world can be found all over YouTube. [more inside]
posted by jonp72 on Mar 14, 2009 - 29 comments

Butthole Surfers were one hell of a live band

Mickey Ween: A security guard came onstage and Gibby threw the alcohol on him. The dude just started backing away, it was clear that Gibby probably would set him on fire. And now, knowing Gibby like I do, it was definitely within the realm of possibility.
Mark Pesetsky: And Gibby just gave me that psycho look with the Charles Manson eyes. He grabs a bottle of the rubbing alcohol and throws it on me and then starts walking towards me with a lighter. And John, the other bouncer, just jumps offstage. It was every man for himself at that point.
Gibby Haynes: Oh yeah, I do remember that. I mean, I've lit kids' heads on fire and they were smiling!
An Oral History of May 3, 1987: The Day The Butthole Surfers Came to Trenton, New Jersey. Butthole Surfers interviewed in bed, parts 1 and 2, playing The Scott & Gary Show on their first run through New York, parts 1 and 2, playing live in 1985 [low quality], live footage from the 80s. [more inside]
posted by Kattullus on Mar 6, 2009 - 51 comments

Japanese voice actresses cover legendary punk songs

Japanese voice actresses cover legendary punk songs (SLYT)
posted by MegoSteve on Feb 28, 2009 - 44 comments

"To me, Pylon was the best band to ever come out of Athens. It still is."

Pylon guitarist and co-founder Randall Bewley died yesterday of a heart attack at age 53. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Feb 26, 2009 - 31 comments

Cruella de Ville [NOT VILLAINESS-IST]

Cruella de Ville, the band, were formed by fraternal twins (with identical voices) Philomena and Colum Muinzer. They were probably best known for their single, "Those Two Dreadful Children", which appeared on Dr. Demento's show a number of times. CdV were only around for a short time (1982-1984) before dropping off the map [citation needed], but thanks to the internets and youtubeses, we can revisit their tiny catalogue: pop nuggets in a manic, cheeky, theatrical punk vein. But just when you thought you'd pegged their sound...
posted by not_on_display on Feb 11, 2009 - 14 comments

Chumbawamba

Her majesty's a pretty nice girl but she never did a thing for me [more inside]
posted by finite on Feb 4, 2009 - 53 comments

Klezmer and selling out

David Goo and the Variety Band have been gigging in London for a few years, but a recent appearance as a soundtrack to an advert could be what propels them to the big time. Merging ska, punk, indie and klezmer influences, read an interview with them here as they speculate on the concept of 'selling out'
posted by muggsy1079 on Jan 21, 2009 - 9 comments

Ron Asheton, R.I.P.

Ron Asheton, influential guitarist and bassist for The Stooges and Destroy All Monsters, has passed away at age 60.
posted by Dr-Baa on Jan 6, 2009 - 58 comments

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