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Visual Patterns.

Visual Patterns. Here are the first few steps. What's the equation?
posted by Wolfdog on Feb 18, 2014 - 19 comments

Objects in your crosshairs are exactly the size that they appear to be

This tech demo video from Pillow Castle Games (of Carnegie Mellon) showcases an innovative first person puzzler using the optical illusion of forced perspective.
posted by codacorolla on Jan 9, 2014 - 17 comments

Dark Incantations In Corrupt Languages

Produce the number 2014 without any numbers in your source codeWrite a program that always outputs “2012” - even if it's modified!Obfuscated Hello WorldPrint your code backwards - reverse quineShortest code to print a smiley faceWrite the shortest program that generates the most compiler warnings and errors [more inside]
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jan 5, 2014 - 16 comments

The Hodge-Podge Transformer

They told me this was the Transformer. The Hodge-Podge Transformer, en route to the Ossuary. I don't understand what any of that means. I wish I could go to the Ossuary. The place of bones. That sounds simple and quiet, unlike this terrible place. [more inside]
posted by smcg on Jan 2, 2014 - 5 comments

Puzzle Nerd Nirvana

griddlers.net (Java required) is a terrific site for puzzle players. [more inside]
posted by Ipsifendus on Dec 26, 2013 - 6 comments

Every customer has a name, but custRec is a database record

Introduction to Abject-Oriented Programming. (via /. embedded link) [more inside]
posted by JoeXIII007 on Oct 16, 2013 - 38 comments

PuzzleScript

PuzzleScript: an open-source HTML5 puzzle game engine [GitHub]
posted by brundlefly on Oct 6, 2013 - 17 comments

Ancient Greek Geometry: The Game

The regular polygons have been kidnapped by ninjas. Are you a bad enough dude/tte to construct the regular polygons with nothing but a virtual compass and straightedge? [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jul 3, 2013 - 67 comments

Pizzuzzles in the hizzouse!

Puzzle World is a repository of puzzle awesomeness. In includes types of puzzles (including a great selection of burr puzzles), puzzle designers, a staggering index of puzzles, and a plethora of puzzling resources. For the most committed puzzle pursuer, Puzzle World also hosts a digital reprint of Stewart Coffin's seminal work The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections (previously). Bonus: sliding block puzzles!
posted by slogger on Mar 1, 2013 - 9 comments

The Lambourne Configuration

How to carve a puzzle out of an apple. [via]
posted by quin on Dec 27, 2012 - 15 comments

The Marquis de Sade of the puzzle world

[Henry] Hook has come to be known as the Marquis de Sade of the puzzle world: a brilliant and oddly beloved misanthrope, administering exquisite torture through dozens of puzzle books and syndicated crosswords.
posted by Egg Shen on Nov 26, 2012 - 6 comments

It is a Puzzlement

The Jerry Slocum Mechanical Puzzle Collection, given to Indiana University in 2006, is now online, with images and descriptions of some 24,000 puzzles, from an 18th century Japanese puzzle to nearly 300 kinds of Rubik's Cubes. [more inside]
posted by Horace Rumpole on Jan 27, 2012 - 11 comments

Meme-ory Game

20 Things That Happened on the Internet in 2011 from Syzygy (2010 version).
posted by mrgrimm on Jan 25, 2012 - 34 comments

This works out to about 1.3366106203729717328004388722211 * 10^1477 possible combinations

Watch me SOLVE a 20x20x20 cube! Step 1 is to solve all of the centers, step 2 is to solve all of the edges, and step 3 is to solve the cube as if it were a rubik's cube (3x3x3).
posted by troll on Dec 27, 2011 - 16 comments

GEGS (9, 4)

Derek Crozier was an idiosyncratic crossword setter who, under the pseudonym Crosaire, ran the Irish Times cryptic crossword singlehandedly for almost 70 years. He died in April 2010 at the age of 92, having compiled over 14000 daily crosswords. The last puzzle completed before his death, number 14605, runs in today's Irish Times. [more inside]
posted by rollick on Oct 21, 2011 - 6 comments

Man writes on little blue website.

Great news: Broken Picture Telephone lives, it's called Teledraw!
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane on Sep 25, 2011 - 31 comments

The [Queue] Is Present

Marina Abramovic's 2010 MoMA exhibit, "The Artist Is Present" (previously) meets 1980s Sierra adventure games. (No word yet on whether the game has made anyone cry.) Thoughts from the creator.
posted by naju on Sep 16, 2011 - 26 comments

Back to Stars Hollow, LORELAI

How Will Shortz Edits a New York Times Crossword Puzzle
posted by SpiffyRob on Sep 14, 2011 - 63 comments

MagicCube5D

In the spirit of taking things too far, here is a fully functional 5-dimensional analogue of Rubik's cube.
posted by Trurl on Sep 12, 2011 - 50 comments

It's a bag for oranges, sad oranges that weep for Spring, denying their fruitness, only to sour and wilt. Or maybe a container for socks. It could be a metaphor for soft tender moist eager buttons...

The Deutsches Technikmuseum has many interesting exhibits, some of which are puzzling... [more inside]
posted by twoleftfeet on Aug 4, 2011 - 6 comments

Sandiego?

"Looking at the world through via Google Earth offers striking images of the diversity of our planet and the impact that humans have had on it. Today's entry is a puzzle. We're challenging you to figure out where in the world each of the images below is taken. (You'll find answers and links at the bottom of the entry.) North is not always up in these pictures, and, apart from a bit of contrast, they are unaltered images provided by Google and its mapping partners. So I invite you to open up Google Earth (or Google Maps), have a look at the images below, and dive in. Good luck!"
posted by vidur on Aug 3, 2011 - 22 comments

Farmer Arepo Turns His Wheel

SATOR
AREPO
TENET
OPERA
ROTAS
posted by Iridic on Jul 26, 2011 - 105 comments

Eh... needs to be about 20% cooler

It is quite likely this is the coolest desk in the world! (Well, even if that's hyperbole, there are lots of other beautiful puzzles and woodworks in Kagen Schaefer's gallery, including some of his award winners from the annual Nob Yoshigahara Puzzle Design Competition.)
posted by Wolfdog on Jun 28, 2011 - 28 comments

What is the title of this post?

92 years young, the delightful Raymond Smullyan is a mathematician, logician, magician, concert pianist, and Taoist philosopher - who also pioneered retrograde chess problems.
posted by Trurl on Jun 26, 2011 - 22 comments

Browser Experiments

Tolia Demidov presents browser experiments, illusions, puzzles, and... fun.
posted by netbros on Nov 15, 2010 - 4 comments

Tambal byuyun, no es fácil!

Linguistics Challenge Puzzles! (Difficulty ranging from green circles to double black diamonds...Friday fun for all!) [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Aug 20, 2010 - 34 comments

Magic numbers: A meeting of mathemagical tricksters

"Gary Foshee, a collector and designer of puzzles from Issaquah near Seattle walked to the lectern to present his talk. It consisted of the following three sentences: "I have two children. One is a boy born on a Tuesday. What is the probability I have two boys?"" [more inside]
posted by andoatnp on May 25, 2010 - 233 comments

Martin Gardner died

From James Randi, Martin Gardner died.
posted by hexatron on May 22, 2010 - 142 comments

Easy AI with Python

Easy AI with Python. High school-level introduction to a few artificial intelligence concepts, with relatively short open source Python code snippets. [more inside]
posted by cowbellemoo on May 21, 2010 - 22 comments

Moving Remy in Harmony

Moving Remy in Harmony - Pixar's Use of Harmonic Functions. [more inside]
posted by Wolfdog on Apr 15, 2010 - 38 comments

Logic Puzzles

Since 1980, Nikoli^ has been in the business of creating many different variations of logic puzzles (such as the very popular Sudoku and Kakuro). Unfortunately, as they're stationed in Tokyo, their magazine is unavailable to most Americans.

Luckily, over the decades they've inspired quite a few people to make their own puzzles and variants, including:
posted by flatluigi on Feb 17, 2010 - 12 comments

All Gnytte Long

The Sexaholics of Truthteller Planet - yes, it's one of those rotten logic problems, one of many that can be found at Tanya Khovanova’s Math Guide to the MIT Mystery Hunt.
posted by Wolfdog on Jan 13, 2010 - 21 comments

Delightful Puzzles

A gathering of puzzles including many old chestnuts but also perhaps one or two you haven't met before.
posted by Wolfdog on Dec 16, 2009 - 29 comments

2 Across: Send in the ______. (6 Letters)

Stephen Sondheim's crossword puzzles for "New York Magazine." Incredibly rare.
posted by grumblebee on Oct 29, 2009 - 35 comments

Oracles in the community

Painting +puzzle +compulsory 'Da Vinci' ref. Glasgow artist Frank McNab Previously has an interesting series of paintings on display in an exhibition at the Mitchell Library in Glasgow. Running until the end of October the paintings have the common theme of 'Libraries in the Community" and are a celebration of both the buildings themselves and their patrons. Check out the link not just for the obvious quality of the works on display but also to see if YOU can be the one to solve the riddle hidden within the paintings themselves.
posted by Wrick on Aug 28, 2009 - 2 comments

4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42, and Other CIA Secrets Hidden in Plain Sight

Wired's Mystery Issue, guest-edited by J.J. Abrams, is a quizzical amalgam of puzzling things both obvious and less obvious... apparently the print edition's misspelled words, irregular borders, and seemingly random placements of numbers are all part of the game too. While the "master puzzle" was recently solved, there are reportedly still some codes left to crack. [more inside]
posted by pokermonk on Apr 22, 2009 - 27 comments

Spot the 9 differences

Difference Games offers you 9 spot-the-difference games. The 3 categories are Graphic Novels and Comics, Play With Mum and Difference Xtreme! My favorite is The Dragon and the Wizard, which makes failure interesting.
Difference Games offers you 9 "spot the difference" games. The three categories are Graphic Novels & Comics; Play with Mum and Difference Xtreme! My favourite is The Dragon and the Wizard, which makes success interesting.
posted by Kattullus on Dec 16, 2008 - 33 comments

The Mathemagician and Pied Puzzler, and others

The Mathemagician and Pied Puzzler (PDF, rough table of contents here) is a collection of puzzles created by members of the Gathering 4 Gardner Foundation, in tribute to the man himself (previously). Also freely available at the G4G site is Puzzle Craft (PDF), by Stewart Coffin. (The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections, also by Coffin, is available here.)
posted by cog_nate on Oct 1, 2008 - 9 comments

Cryptarithms

   MEFI
META
+ ASKME
-------
FILTER
Each letter corresponds to a number 0-9. The solution is unique. [more inside]
posted by Upton O'Good on Sep 3, 2008 - 27 comments

Twisty megapost

Walter Randelshofer's Pretty Patterns collection (for Rubik's cubes up to 5x5x5) is one of the nicest twisty puzzle sites going. It's based on his CubeTwister software, which you can download (including a lovely OS X standalone). If you really want a treasure trove of twisty polyhedra, check out gelatinBrain's enormous collection of java applets (which unfortunately don't do so well on macs). Are those things even physically possible? Really? Mini bonus: Randelshofer also hosts an archive of fondly-remembered Amiga animations.
posted by Wolfdog on Mar 31, 2008 - 8 comments

Chess Problems

Chess Problems has hundreds of problems in six difficulty classes from novice to fiendish [java]
posted by Kattullus on Feb 16, 2008 - 10 comments

Click.

Created by flash artist and graphic novelist Mateusz Skutnik, Submachine is one of the class acts of the point-and-click Web-game genre. Mesmerizing, layered and absorbing, the latest chapter in the series has just been released. [more inside]
posted by jbickers on Feb 1, 2008 - 11 comments

Cut The Knot

Interactive mathematics miscellany and puzzles, including 75 proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem, an interactive column using Java applets, and eye-opening demonstrations. (Actually, much more.)
posted by parudox on Dec 1, 2007 - 11 comments

Logic puzzles

A virtually unlimited supply of randomly-generated logic puzzles, in a variety of sizes and difficulties: Nonograms. Slither Link. Nurikabe. Bridges. Light Up.
posted by Upton O'Good on Nov 28, 2007 - 18 comments

Spot the Five Differences.

Spot the Five Differences. It is fun. [flash]
posted by brain_drain on Oct 10, 2007 - 88 comments

National Geographic Photos Online

National Geographic Magazine is all about the photos. Check out the Editor's Choices. Other goodness includes the Daily Dozen, a jigsaw puzzle generator, and user-generated photo galleries.
posted by RussHy on Oct 1, 2007 - 9 comments

Won't somebody PLEASE think of the children?

Bored on your summer vacation? Well, the US government has lots of fun stuff for kids to do on line. Learn fascinating facts about cows (and agricultural marketing!) from the Department of Agriculture. Take a ride to Money Central Station with the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. If you live in a federally-funded housing project, HUD wants you to learn more about being a good citizen. Want something more action-packed? Help FBI Special Agent Bobby Bureau go undercover, or become one of America's Crypto-Kids at the NSA. Play thrilling puzzle games or visit the world's most secret museum at the CIA. Play more games or become a Disaster Action Kid at FEMA! And no list of government kids' pages would be complete without revisiting the children's art contest from the ATF, which I've linked to before...
posted by dersins on Jul 25, 2007 - 5 comments

PuzzleFilter

Puzzability is a puzzle writing company created by three former editors of Games Magazine. Start with their puzzle sampler and come back for a set of regularly updated games. Puzzability is also responsible for creating the New York Times' intricately crafted Op-Ed Puzzles. Unlike the Times' daily crosswords, these wonderfully elaborate puzzles are available in a free archive.
posted by lalex on Jun 26, 2007 - 8 comments

Snakes, in my heart-blood warm'd, that sting my heart!

SlitherLink - a little spatial-numerical puzzle. Here's a better exposition of the rules from the puzzle's inventors, and another collection of puzzles. Oh, and a little survey of other sneaky, snaky puzzles.
posted by Wolfdog on May 31, 2007 - 18 comments

Ages 8-Adult

Rush Hour is a sliding block puzzle invented by Nob Yoshigahara and manufactured by ThinkFun. The goal of the game is to get the red car out of a six-by-six gridlock of vehicles by moving the other vehicles out of its way (youtoob). There are several online versions in Java/Flash (bottom of link)- my favorite has the first 2 complete sets from the board game. It's a gentle warm-up for your brain.
posted by MtDewd on Jan 25, 2007 - 19 comments

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