15 posts tagged with quackery.
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Cancer Quackery? There's An App for That!

Belle Gibson and the Pernicious Cult of 'Wellness.' Jenny McCartney writes in The Spectator about the unraveling business empire and reputation of Australian celebrity "wellness" blogger and "cancer survivor" Belle Gibson. [more inside]
posted by spitbull on Mar 29, 2015 - 62 comments

I’m Autistic, And Believe Me, It’s A Lot Better Than Measles

We’re no more or less imperfect or tragic than the average family. We don’t even have measles.
posted by sleepy psychonaut on Feb 9, 2015 - 72 comments

There are no Z-Rays

Help stamp out quackery.
posted by nadawi on Sep 2, 2013 - 37 comments

a bumpy guide to mate selection & other life choices

"Young ladies, indelibly fix this shape of head in your memories. Any man who will make a natural, kind and true husband will have a head in outline from a side view like this." Phrenology Diagrams from Vaught's Practical Character Reader (1902). Full 268-page book available in the LOC's Internet Archive.
posted by madamjujujive on Jun 9, 2013 - 26 comments

The science of baseball's magical necklaces

This is the background needed to begin to understand why tonight, as the World Series begins between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Texas Rangers, the field will probably be full of men who are wearing what can best be perhaps described as magical necklaces. Or, if you're the geeky type, call them +5 Amulets of Baseball Enhancement.
posted by veedubya on Oct 20, 2011 - 61 comments

21st. Century Snake Oil

"Con men used to travel town to town hawking medical remedies said to be made of Chinese snakes. Snake oil was useless and dangerous. So the FDA was created to put a stop to it and other food and drug scams. But, today, quack medicine has never been bigger. In the 21st century, snake oil has been replaced by bogus therapies using stem cells. Stem cells may offer cures one day, but medical charlatans on the Internet are making outrageous claims that they can reverse the incurable, from autism to multiple sclerosis to every kind of cancer."* Video Part 1 [13:15] || Part 2 [11:49]. [more inside]
posted by ericb on Apr 18, 2010 - 33 comments

The Radium Water Worked Fine Until His Jaw Came Off

The Radium Water Worked Fine Until His Jaw Came Off: Eben Byers was just one victim of a clear case of radioactive quackery. But the theory may not have been completely bunk. It's the radiation hormesis hypothesis. Previously.
posted by sunnichka on Mar 2, 2010 - 27 comments

The 12% Solution

Everybody Loves That HADACOL~!
posted by jtron on Feb 1, 2010 - 16 comments

Stop being so bad scientish y'all

Neal's Yard Remedies gets a less-than-gentle reception from readers in a Guardian Q and A.
posted by Turtles all the way down on May 27, 2009 - 77 comments

Ig Nobel

Professor Luc Montagnier, 2008 Nobel Prize Laureate for Medicine, is no stranger to controversy. Recently, he has been touting his approval for the ignominiously debunked "water memory" theories of the late French immunologist Dr. Jacques Benveniste. This is not altogether surprising, given that Montagnier has filed a patent application for a method for characterising "biologically active biochemical elements" based on Benveniste's more outlandish theories. But there's more... [more inside]
posted by Skeptic on Mar 15, 2009 - 13 comments

Timecube Audio, Inc.

For two decades, Peter Belt has been selling $75 pens, $750 alligator clips, "Quantum Cream" and "foil", and other somewhat pricey and *ahem* unconventional products to audiophiles, claiming these will improve the sound of their fancy hi-fi systems. Unsurprisingly, some are skeptical; however, others seem quite convinced.
posted by kickingtheground on Feb 9, 2004 - 11 comments

Scientific Instuments

Health Physics Instrumentation Collection. A shoe-fitting fluoroscope, Geiger Mueller detectors, civil defence items, atomic movie posters, radioactive quack cures, radiation warning signs, etc.
Much more in the way of historical scientific instrumentation at the University of Toronto Museum of Scientific Instuments : exhibits on psychology, acoustics, and early electron microscopy; more in the collections.
American Artifacts has some interesting articles and illustrations on antique scientific and medical instruments, such as these quack eye massagers.
posted by plep on Aug 17, 2003 - 10 comments

quackwatch

QuackWatch.Org has long been a solid source for debunking medical claims by alternative health care practioners. But it turns out things are not all they are Quacked up to be, find out who is really behind the QuackWatch Conspiracy at QuackPotWatch.Org
posted by stbalbach on Apr 24, 2003 - 40 comments

Hymen not included

Hymen and the back seat of your father's car not included It’s requirement for ladies who looses their virginity (virgin size) usually after delivery and some cases before also and slowly both partner looses interest in each other without knowing the cause, this Virgin cream gives you complete youthfulness and bring back virginity (virgin size) to its original shape. Your partner starts taking interest in you, which you might have not experienced before.
posted by orange swan on Apr 10, 2003 - 53 comments

"Are you ready to experience the future of digital pleasure?"'

"Are you ready to experience the future of digital pleasure?"' That link hit my inbox closely on the heels of my perusing this thread. From a 'moral standpoint', better than/worse than/same as inducing something internally?
posted by JettSuperior on Aug 18, 2002 - 23 comments

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