7 posts tagged with racism and hollywood.
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Racism, Sexism, and Hannibal: Eat the Rude

Hettienne Park writes a thoughtful response to recent events in Brian Fuller's Hannibal (link to Nerdist Writer's Panel podcast), specifically the most recent episode, Takiawase (link to AV Club Review). Spoilers ahoy in all links.
posted by PussKillian on Mar 25, 2014 - 620 comments

Avengers Dissemble!

The First Non-Avenger: Captain America and His Non-Struggles Against the Holocaust and Racism
posted by Renoroc on Aug 7, 2011 - 49 comments

Akira adaptation courts white actors

Beloved anime classic Akira (previously) is in the process of getting a live-action adaption courtesy of Warner Bros. and Legendary Pictures. In fact, they're currently trying to assemble a cast. Oddly enough, despite keeping the leading characters' names Kaneda and Tetsuo, all the actors approached are white. This hasn't gone unnoticed, and Racebending.com is preparing a campaign to protest. Just last year M. Night Shyamalan's adaption of The Last Airbender (previously) drew massive criticism for having an all-white cast in an Asian setting. [more inside]
posted by Harald74 on Mar 24, 2011 - 230 comments

Kodak theater - whites only?

Oscars take a pass on people of color. [more inside]
posted by Baby_Balrog on Jan 26, 2011 - 193 comments

Hiro, Protagonist?

Racism and Sexism in Heroes and Hollywood [more inside]
posted by jtron on Feb 9, 2010 - 69 comments

The Paradox of Michael Bay

You can love him or hate him but Transformers made $250,000,000 last week. To some, Michael Bay is a genius. To others he's a racist hack. Or just a hack. He may even be both a hack and a genius. Is this evidence of an auteur? Or does dude just like really big explosions? Plus: a character driven Bay film?
posted by PostIronyIsNotaMyth on Jul 9, 2007 - 124 comments

"I'd rather play a maid than be one"

Call her Madame. Among the old-timers, the story went like this: a woman known to everyone as Madame came to California from Kentucky with her children and her husband. But once they were in the Gold Rush State, her husband left her. Desperate to find work, she introduced herself to a movie director named D. W. Griffith. He not only cast her in his movie, but the two became friends for life. And with this woman, called Madame Sul-Te-Wan, what we now call Black Hollywood began -- as a new book by historian Donald Bogle explains. (more inside)
posted by matteo on Feb 7, 2005 - 6 comments

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