672 posts tagged with radio.
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Anthropology, already read

Déjà Lu republishes locally-selected scholarly articles from journals connected to regional anthropological associations around the world. The result is a PDF-heavy but fascinating collection of long reads on obscure topics. Via. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on Apr 18, 2015 - 4 comments

Getting What You Paid For

The hidden FM radio inside your pocket -- and why you can't use it. [more inside]
posted by flatluigi on Apr 17, 2015 - 105 comments

Guaranteed puppy free

For her 85th birthday, BBC Radio 4 has broadcast a new interview with and documentary about Ursula K. Le Guin, as well as the first radio dramatisation of The Left Hand of Darkness and a a new Earthsea serial coming soon.
posted by MartinWisse on Apr 13, 2015 - 13 comments

Cette grève est pour vous

For the past three weeks, listeners to France's seven public radio stations have heard little other than music - even on news and speech stations such as France Info and France Inter. The longest strike in the history of Radio France is showing no sign of coming to an end, with both sides becoming more entrenched. [more inside]
posted by winterhill on Apr 9, 2015 - 10 comments

"Can I look at it?" "No, no - you've seen enough of that one..."

Les Paul's 1954 Custom: The One & Only Original by Michael Molenda, Guitar Player. More on Les Paul, and his partnership with Mary Ford, at Gibson.com. YouTube: How High The Moon (1951). [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 28, 2015 - 24 comments

CBS brings you ....SUSPENSE!

Suspense was a thriller-style radio drama that ran on CBS from 1942 to 1962 and is widely considered to be one of the greatest Old Time Radio (or "Golden Age Of Radio") series and model for "The Twilight Zone". In addition to theme music by Bernard Herrmann and scripts by leading mystery authors of the day, Suspense also featured a stunning roll call of big-name Hollywood stars, often playing against type or in more lurid material then the movie studios would allow. While nearly all 947 episodes are available online (exhaustively comprehensive previously) the sheer number of episodes can be daunting. Old Time Radio Review is halfway through the series with a convenient rating system to finding the best - why not enjoy these Youtube versions of a few episodes starring Judy Garland, Lucille Ball, Robert Taylor, Orson Wells, Agnes Moorehead (again), Cary Grant, and more
posted by The Whelk on Mar 12, 2015 - 31 comments

I wonder if he lives in a valley?

The new host of Q has been announced! It's Shad / Shadrach Kabango. Some coverage at the Globe and the Mothership. [more inside]
posted by Lemurrhea on Mar 10, 2015 - 27 comments

Power85 - your source for non-stop synth

Power 85 is non stop streaming of the best dreamwave, synthpop, outrun, and neo retro 80s music, featuring instant requests. (previously)
posted by rebent on Mar 10, 2015 - 20 comments

A New Hope For Radio

The extended NPR produced adaptation of 'A New Hope' for your listening pleasure. [more inside]
posted by bq on Mar 9, 2015 - 13 comments

Radios in museums

Do you like radios? And museums? Then you need the radiomuseum.org gazatteer of museums and historical places around the world where you can look at radios and associated technologies!
posted by carter on Feb 25, 2015 - 8 comments

Now, I can see wifi signals.

Most of us are surrounded by a myriad of radio signals. Some inspired people have taken the opportunity to enable us to see them. Often seemingly random but with a semblance of pattern, the Rayleigh fading model describes much of what you see. via Hacker News
posted by escher on Feb 16, 2015 - 13 comments

Fish and CHiPs all over the place

Maybe you've wondered what a Sig Alert is.
posted by bq on Jan 25, 2015 - 26 comments

"We said, this is something strange, and we need your telescope badly"

January 14, 2005. The Huygens probe was falling to Titan(yt). Released after a seven year trip on Cassini, the tiny lander was mankind's first attempt to land on a moon of another world - and nobody knew what would happen next. Its signals, no more powerful than a walkie-talkie, were to be gathered by the mothership and the science relayed back to Earth. More than a light-hour away back at home planet, radio telescopes were also listening not to decode data - far too weak at that distance, even for the most powerful receivers - but to see whether they could hear Huygens at all. A job for radio engineers, not for heroes. Sometimes, though, you have to be both. [more inside]
posted by Devonian on Jan 14, 2015 - 9 comments

Abstract of Underpinning Rthymns

Bang on pot and pans. [more inside]
posted by ArticTusk on Jan 13, 2015 - 1 comment

Tonight I'm going to party like it's 1949.

Why ring out 2014, when you can celebrate the end of 1976 with Donny & Marie (along with Tina Turner, Rip Taylor, and Billy Preston). Or try 1961 with Dinah Shore and Nat King Cole. But if television is too modern for you, you can always just sit back and listen to a old-time NYE Radio Show.
posted by fings on Dec 31, 2014 - 11 comments

"Radio as Music"

Glenn Gould's North is an essay about the radio documentaries composed by Canadian classical pianist Glenn Gould. The most famous are the three "contrapuntal" documentaries which comprise The Solitude Trilogy [available on Spotify and can be purchased on iTunes]. What is contrapuntal radio? The Glenn Gould Foundation explained in series of short podcasts, and a glimpse of Gould's scripts and diagrams may aid understanding, as well as quotes by Gould and others about The Solitude Trilogy. Many have responded to The Solitude Trilogy, from the perspectives of a hermit, mennonite, and a collage artist, whose collage series can be seen here. As the title suggests, The Solitude Trilogy deals with isolation, quietude, loneliness, seclusion and solitude in modern life, but Gould also made documentaries on a variety of musical subjects, such as Richard Strauss and sixties pop singer Petula Clark. Most of his documentaries, including The Solitude Trilogy, are available for listening on the website of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Links below. [more inside]
posted by Kattullus on Dec 31, 2014 - 9 comments

Joyeaux Noel, Y'all

Via fivethirtyeight.com, the explanation for why I can't go 24 hours without hearing 'Feliz Navidad' between Thanksgiving and New Year's. Goddamnit.
posted by Ipsifendus on Dec 12, 2014 - 91 comments

Walter Benjamin for Children

Walter Benjamin presented "True Dog Stories" on September 27, 1930, as part of Radio Berlin's youth programming. Thoughtful but sometimes oblique commentaries on human society, Benjamin's radio shows have been called "Enlightenment for Children" and "NPR for weirdos," but an interview with the editor of their recent translations into English gives much greater context. Some essays have been re-recorded in German (including the dog episode, track 16), and Börne's original poodle letter is also online.
posted by Monsieur Caution on Dec 4, 2014 - 4 comments

Gentrification and badly dressed white people

Vidal Reyna is a waiter at El Arco Iris, one of Highland Park’s oldest Mexican restaurants, owned by his wife’s family. He grew up here. He says the moment he understood that his neighborhood was becoming a different place happened on a drive with his father. Reyna recalls, 'He turns around and tells me in Spanish, ‘Hay muchos gueros mal vestidos por aqui.’” Loosely translated, that means “around here, there are a lot of badly dressed white people.” In August Marketplace's Wealth & Poverty Desk opened an office in Highland Park, Los Angeles, to get a view of gentrification from their new neighbours.
posted by Bella Donna on Dec 1, 2014 - 51 comments

Melvyn, no need to Bragg

Melvyn Bragg's been digging deep for more than 40 years. You may know In Our Time [previously], The South Bank Show [previouslier] or The Adventure of English. If you don't, you probably should. [more inside]
posted by stinker on Nov 29, 2014 - 57 comments

Thomas King wins Governor-General’s Award for fiction.

Thomas King wins Governor-General’s Award for fiction In February, King won the British Columbia’s National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction for The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America. On Tuesday, he won the Governor-General’s Literary Award for Fiction for The Back of the Turtle, his first novel in 15 years. [more inside]
posted by Nevin on Nov 27, 2014 - 8 comments

A laptop of one's own

Now, however, the internet has created a revolution in the place of young women in our culture, granting millions of them the chance to represent themselves to the world in all sorts of ways that Ruby Tandoh argues are both tremendously exciting and profoundly empowering. She'll look back at the development of the place of girls in youth culture over the decades, examining the importance of the private space of the bedroom in providing a crucible in which identities are actively formed, and find out about those young women in movements like punk and Riot Grrrl who blazed a trail for today's girls as they take the reins of cultural production through their vlogs, blogs and zines.
From Radio 4's Archive on 4 programme comes A Girl's Own Story.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 17, 2014 - 3 comments

A national treasure drives off into the sunset, perhaps belching smoke.

Tom Magliozzi, one of public radio's most popular personalities, died on Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 77 years old. Tom was one half of Click and Clack (The Tappet Brothers) on NPR's popular Car Talk. [more inside]
posted by RolandOfEld on Nov 3, 2014 - 292 comments

Dick Cavett’s Worst Show

Promoting his new book Brief Encounters, talkshow host Dick Cavett appears on CBC's Sunday Edition with Michael Enright. Cavett recounts to Michael Enright about a legendary on-air donnybrook between Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer in 1971 on his show, a frank discussion with Richard Burton about alcoholism, being singled out by Richard Nixon for revenge, and Dick Cavett's worst show.
posted by Nevin on Nov 2, 2014 - 20 comments

48 minues of 1978 radio

Charly Jones, KZEW-FM Dallas, 1978.
they played songs and Disc-Jockeys talked about nudists...Also
1975 KZEW-FM
1967 Top 40 KVIL
Demos '82-'83
...dig those groovy sounds.
posted by shockingbluamp on Oct 25, 2014 - 5 comments

"...to stay conscious and alive, day in and day out."

Endnotes: David Foster Wallace, BBC Documentary. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Oct 19, 2014 - 5 comments

Opera On Demand

Top hat at the cleaners? Opera glasses broke? Lost your box? Watch The Metropolitan Opera, the Bavarian State Opera (Deutsch, English) Vienna State Opera, or concerts from the Berlin Philharmonic and a variety of options from medici.tv and The Young Vic, The Globe, The Royal Opera House, The Royal Shakespeare Company, and more. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 17, 2014 - 9 comments

But who WAS presenting the Nine O'Clock News on 24 November 1995?

Ever wanted to know who was on BBC Radio 1 at 1pm on Sunday 6 February, 1994*? Or what happened in EastEnders on 13 October 1998**? Or who was on the Top of the Pops Christmas special in 1971? Genome can answer that. [more inside]
posted by garlicsmack on Oct 16, 2014 - 11 comments

Like a radio but with five O's

RADIOOOOO.COM IS A MUSICAL SPACE-TIME MACHINE!
posted by cmoj on Oct 9, 2014 - 6 comments

"A Pyramid Scheme"

"Imagine a job where about half of all the work is being done by people who are in training. That is, in fact, what happens in the world of biological and medical research." --- NPR reports [audio] on postdocs & the scientific workforce as part of a series on the funding crisis in biomedical research. The series also includes When Scientists Give Up [audio], and U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding [audio].
posted by Westringia F. on Sep 16, 2014 - 53 comments

Bradbury 13

In 1984, Michael McDonough of Brigham Young University produced "Bradbury 13" [YTPL], a series of 13 audio adaptations of famous Ray Bradbury stories, in conjunction with National Public Radio. The full-cast dramatizations featured adaptations of "The Ravine," "Night Call, Collect," "The Veldt", "There Was an Old Woman," "Kaleidoscope," "Dark They Were, and Golden-Eyed", "The Screaming Woman," "A Sound of Thunder," "The Man," "The Wind," "The Fox and the Forest," "Here There Be Tygers" and "The Happiness Machine". Voiceover actor Paul Frees [previously] provided narration, while Bradbury himself was responsible for the opening voiceover...
posted by jim in austin on Sep 8, 2014 - 12 comments

Bringing about Armageddon can be dangerous. Especially on the Radio.

The BBC has announced that it will be producing a radio dramatization of Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett's book, Good Omens. The radio drama will be broadcast as six episodes in December on BBC Radio 4, and will feature Mark Heap and Peter Serafinowicz in the lead roles.
posted by schmod on Sep 7, 2014 - 39 comments

AM/FM - the story of London's pirate radio stations

AM/FM - the story of London's pirate radio stations [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by aniola on Aug 30, 2014 - 2 comments

The Cello and The Nightingale

In 1924 the BBC transmitted its first live outside broadcast: a duet between cellist Beatrice Harrison and the nightingales nesting in the garden of her Surrey home. Capturing the song of the Nightingale. [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Aug 16, 2014 - 10 comments

Incredible truths and barely credible lies

"Welcome to The Unbelievable Truth, the panel game show about incredible truths and barely credible lies. I am your host, David Mitchell. The rules are as follows: each panelist will present a short lecture that should be entirely false save for five pieces of true information which they should attempt to smuggle past their opponents – cunningly concealed amongst the lies. Points are scored by truths that go unnoticed while other panelists can win a point if they spot a truth or lose points if they mistake a lie for a truth."
Having recently concluded its 13th series, the show has amassed 81 episodes. For your listening pleasure: [more inside]
posted by Lexica on Jul 29, 2014 - 43 comments

A hundred years ago Europe was in the midst of the July Crisis.

The BBC will be covering World War One in great detail over the next four years. They've already started, with podcasts, interactive guides, online courses, programs new and old plus much, much more. Perhaps it's best to start at the beginning, with Professor Margaret MacMillan's Countdown to World War One (podcast link) or the account of her fellow historian Christopher Clark, Month of Madness. Of course, how the war started is still contested by historians, as recounted in The Great War of Words. The latter two are also part of the main WWI podcast. Or you can dive into the Music and Culture section, go through an A-Z guide or look at comics drawn by modern cartoonists.
posted by Kattullus on Jul 27, 2014 - 42 comments

"And we're dancing with the dead / that are dancing in our head"

Bringing Wes home.
How Sound is a podcast on radio storytelling on Public Radio Exchange that focuses on the story behind the radio story, and this episode is called "Bringing Wes home". I'd recommend listening to it cold with no more information than that, but if you'd like to know a bit more, the episode description is below the fold. [more inside]
posted by Lexica on Jul 20, 2014 - 2 comments

Classic Rock Peaked (By Song Plays) in 1973

Why Classic Rock (Radio) Isn't What It Used to Be (SL538)
posted by box on Jul 7, 2014 - 148 comments

This video achieves “Shepard Smith watching True Blood” gayness levels.

Dave Holmes (yes that Dave Holmes) re-vists the hit songs and music videos of July 1983
posted by The Whelk on Jul 5, 2014 - 40 comments

Vin Scully Retrospective

Vin Scully: voice of the Dodgers for 64 years "My idea is that I'm sitting next to the listener in the ballpark, and we're just watching the game," Scully says. "Sometimes, our conversation leaves the game. It might be a little bit about the weather we're enduring or enjoying. It might be personal relationships, which would involve a player. The game is just one long conversation and I'm anticipating that, and I will say things like ‘Did you know that?' or ‘You're probably wondering why.' I'm really just conversing rather than just doing play-by-play. I never thought of myself as having a style. I don't use key words. And the best thing I do? I shut up."
posted by mandymanwasregistered on Jun 6, 2014 - 22 comments

“Rangers, Lead The Way!”

Experience D-Day like your grandparents did, if they weren't in the military on June 6, 1944. Archive.org has the the complete D-Day broadcast from CBS radio.
posted by COD on Jun 6, 2014 - 31 comments

Shorthand for a long-gone era, groovy religion and journeys into space

Norman Greenbaum discusses the creation and ongoing popularity of 'Spirit in the Sky'
posted by paleyellowwithorange on May 30, 2014 - 50 comments

Long Player

Long Player is a fortnightly show presented by [British music journalist] Pete Paphides. Conducted in a relaxed setting, these interviews see some of Petes favourite artists revisiting the highs and lows of their careers. Interviewees include Allen Toussaint, Linda Thompson, Neil Finn and Jimmy Webb. [more inside]
posted by jack_mo on May 11, 2014 - 7 comments

Listening west with the sunrise

Global Breakfast Radio aggregates radio stations from across the world, constantly streaming broadcasts from wherever it’s breakfast-time right now. (via)
posted by davidjmcgee on May 5, 2014 - 12 comments

Is that what's botherin' ya, bunky?

You say you just learned of the passing of comedian Eddie Lawrence last week at the age of 95?
He was best known for his 1956 routine "The Old Philosopher", in which he gloomily described a litany of sometimes absurdly funny mishaps then changed gears into a cheerleading chant ending in "NEVER GIVE UP (BANG! BANG!) THAT SHIP!*" It was a big hit single (and Dr. Demento staple**) and led to a series of follow-ups, including "Son of the Old Philosopher", the Christmas-themed "Merry Old Philosopher", "The Radio DJ's Old Philosopher" (filled with inside-the-biz jokes) and "The Old Philosopher On The Range", as well as radio commercials based on the bit: "Leave It To (John) Leavitt"***. [more inside]
posted by oneswellfoop on Mar 31, 2014 - 22 comments

"We're no longer a radio network, we're a sad political glee club"

Left-Wing Darling Pacifica Radio Is Sliding Into the Abyss "The recent internal strife at Pacifica underlines a depressing truth for liberals, for whom the radio network is — or at least was — an important voice in an increasingly homogenized broadcast media landscape." [more inside]
posted by Noisy Pink Bubbles on Mar 19, 2014 - 105 comments

The Kincaid Weekender

The Kincaid Weekender presents local news, politics, sports, theatre reviews, and keeps you up to date with goings on at the stockyards. A pitch-perfect comedic take on small town New Zealand. Dryer than Flight of the Conchords, subtler than Night Vale. Produced for the 2014 New Zealand Fringe Festival and written by award-worthy comedian Jonny Potts.
posted by Catch on Mar 17, 2014 - 4 comments

Partying like it's 2002 with Nelly

Bay Area radio station 105.7 (Santa Clara) has been playing Nelly's 2002 hit "Hot in Herre" for over 48 hours as part of a format change promotion. Originally released in 2002, St. Louis rapper's "Hot in Herre" was produced by the Neptunes on the album "Nellyville." Media outlets around the country have taken notice, including Gawker, Time, and Rolling Stone. As one might imagine, Twitter has also responded. You can listen to the radio station right here.
posted by mostly vowels on Mar 16, 2014 - 64 comments

Oh seven nine oh four seven nine

Grime numbers station, by Autodespair. [more inside]
posted by avocet on Mar 8, 2014 - 11 comments

Full Spectrum Warrior

Inside the new arms race to control bandwidth on the battlefield [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 6, 2014 - 23 comments

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