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AKA "American Regional Food Stereotypes Are Entirely Accurate" -NY Times

After causing some serious angst among the good people of Minnesota (cf. the cri de coeur of ex-Gopher and Mefi's own Linda Holmes) with its own unique Thanksgiving recipe suggestions for each of the 50 nifty United States (previously), the agents provocatuer of the New York Times are back at it again, this time leaning on the Google data team to find out which unusual regional recipes really are the favorites of each state: Behold, the Snickers Salad Belt.
posted by Diablevert on Nov 25, 2014 - 222 comments

"And, of course, the funniest food of all, kumquats." ~George Carlin

Find Your State in the United States of Thanksgiving [The New York Times] "We’ve scoured the nation for recipes that evoke each of the 50 states (and D.C. and Puerto Rico). Tell us your favorites." [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Nov 18, 2014 - 77 comments

Somewhere in-between Chop Suey and Pork Roll, the truth lies.

Recently on The Blue we've had discussions about American Chop Suey and New Jersey Pork Roll, but what about other regional favorites, like Lutefisk, Scrapple, or the French Dip Sandwich? Just in time for Thanksgiving, here are a few links to get you started:

posted by Room 641-A on Nov 17, 2014 - 97 comments

Trick or treat, smell my feet, give me candy to trade for cash

Halloween is not good for the teeth of trick-or-treaters. There's a plethora of candy, and kids will eat candy they wouldn't normally eat, because hey, it's there. What's a parent to do? Offer cash for candy, with the help of a local dentist. Halloween Candy Buyback, complete with zip-code dentist search, the website for the movement that has expanded from it's quiet start in 2005 with a single dentist in Wisconsin. Now, thousands of dentists across the U.S. buy back tons of candy at a dollar a pound, then send the candy with toothbrushes and toothpaste to Operation Gratitude to be added into care packages for active U.S. Military. If you're having trouble getting a younger child to part with their candy, there's the Switch Witch, who will take a pile of candy and switch it for a special switch gift. And if you want to start at the source, you can always make your own candy with one of the various sugar substitutes, or go with a teal pumpkin and avoid the candy all-together.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 31, 2014 - 148 comments

cooking.nytimes.com

As hinted in the leaked digital innovation report which outlined how the venerable newspaper could leverage a substantial archive to compete with clickbait, The New York Times has been developing cooking.nytimes.com, a beautifully searchable repository of every recipe ever published in the newspaper. [more inside]
posted by Juliet Banana on Oct 17, 2014 - 30 comments

Can I make this without the ingredients?

All The Comments on Every Recipe Blog is a list of, well, the most common comments on every recipe blog.
posted by GuyZero on Oct 6, 2014 - 191 comments

Overthinking a plate of American Chop Suey

American Chop Suey (aka Goulash) gets the Food Lab treatment from MeFi favorite J. Kenji López-Alt. (American Chop Suey was the subject of two recent questions on The Green.)
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 4, 2014 - 219 comments

Love pancakes, hate flipping?

Let's bake pancake squares! Everything you knew about breakfast is a lie. [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Sep 3, 2014 - 81 comments

ffish Custard

One pound of Almons beat them small, in the beating put in the Row of a Pike 4 dates cut and the yolkes of 4 Eggs temper it with cold water Straine it through a Strainer & make a quart of it Season it with Suger Rosewater Salt pxxxxe beaten Mace When it is Baked scrape suger on
posted by Lord_Pall on Sep 2, 2014 - 22 comments

Ice Cream without the screaming

Nigella Lawson's Coffee Ice Cream: 4 ingredients. 1 step. No cooking. No churning. One of Food52's Genius Recipes.
posted by Room 641-A on Aug 19, 2014 - 76 comments

"Pizza with a Bisquick crust? Sounds like ’60s home ec to me."

King Arthur Flour's Flourish blog investigates America's Love Affair With Pizza from the home cook's perspective. In The Beginning asks "When did Americans start making their own pizza at home, from scratch, rather than piling into the Studebaker to drive down to the pizza parlor for takeout?", and answers by reproducing pizza recipes from 1945, 1954, and 1961. [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Jul 27, 2014 - 60 comments

Let's Face It, Leaves Are Dumb

The Awl: How to make a salad without all those dumb leaves
posted by The Whelk on Jun 5, 2014 - 109 comments

strawberry-rosemary-gin peach-thyme-tequila raspberry-lavender-champagne

Three bartenders in a backyard teach you how to make three classic summer drinks on a budget: the daiquiri, the gin & tonic, and the mint julep. Not simple enough? How about the only summer cocktail recipe you will ever need?
posted by Juliet Banana on May 19, 2014 - 105 comments

Chocolate and water DO mix!

Molecular gastronomy at its most basic: Chef Heston Blumenthal makes chocolate mousse in five minutes using nothing but chocolate and water. (Heston Blumenthal (previously, pre-previously) [SLYT]
posted by Room 641-A on May 13, 2014 - 29 comments

Alton Brown presents his recipe for cat poo dog treats

Alton Brown presents his recipe for cat poo dog treats.
posted by Evilspork on May 1, 2014 - 48 comments

I GET MY IRON FROM BEEF LIVER! SAME AS STAN LEE!

DC vs Marvel: Kitchen Stadium Edition -- In The Mighty Marvel Superheroes Cookbook, "Mighty Marvel Superheros show you how to perform heroics in the kitchen creating meals that are out of this world!" Meanwhile.... The DC Super Heroes Super Healthy Cookbook simply promises "good food kids can prepare themselves." Let the battle begin! [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 15, 2014 - 31 comments

OnlyTheBestRecipes.com

OnlyTheBestRecipes.com : The top 1% of recipes from sites like allrecipes, food.com, epicurious, and foodnetwork. [via mefi projects]
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering on Feb 3, 2014 - 51 comments

Gelatin, from calf's hoof jelly to Jell-O, "America's Favorite Dessert"

Gelatin foodstuffs have a long culinary history. The ancient Egyptians made a gelatin-like substance from protein-rich animal materials that they used in their cuisine. It wasn't until the 17th century invention of pressure cooking devices that the process of creating gelatin became significantly less labor and time intensive. The process was refined in the following decades, with the US inventor Peter Cooper filing the patent for Improvement in the preparation of portable gelatine in 1845. He never made much of the patent, and sold it to Pearle B. Wait, who's wife, May Davis Wait, helped turn the gelatin into Jell-O, both naming the product and turning it into a sweet, fruit-flavored dessert. They, too, had no luck selling Jell-O, and sold the patent for $450 to Orator Francis Woodward, who struggled for a period, before turning to marketing to increase interest in the dessert (NYT). By 1902, Jell-O was "America's Favorite Dessert," at least according to the advertisements. And now you know the history of gelatin and Jello. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 2, 2014 - 31 comments

It's like caramel-flavored crunchy cotton candy, covered in chocolate

Wings and Beef on Weck aren't the only culinary legacies coming from Buffalo, NY. Sponge candy is an airy, cripsy, delicious confection made with the magic of chemistry (video). [more inside]
posted by misskaz on Jan 16, 2014 - 75 comments

It’s not just a food, it’s a lifestyle

The Best of L.A. Taco: L.A. Taco looks back at the best tacos, art, music and people celebrating the taco lifestyle. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Jan 1, 2014 - 35 comments

Hobbits would only drink ales since lagers are not found on Middle-earth

So, you want to eat like a hobbit do you? The big old dragon of Middle-Earth recipes is the charmingly retro 'Middle-Earth Recipes' (now with a more modern and photo-friendly blog version ) from which NPR's Beth Accomando has complied an all-day feasting menu suitable for marathon watching (or reading) assorted Lord Of The Rings media while Recipewise sticks to foods served by Bilbo in The Hobbit itself and explains the Victorian convention of high vs. low tea. (Author Diane Duane's own Hobbit-inspired recipe, Took Family Seed Cake can be made with poppy rather than caraway seed if that's your thing) Need something to do while digesting? Why not read about the history and meaning of the rural comfort food in Tolkien at Strange Horizons " Well Stocked Larders: Food And Diet Of Hobbits" by Stephanie Green.
posted by The Whelk on Dec 15, 2013 - 45 comments

Many recipes for candy

Make your own candy (canes). Konpeitō. Pop rocks. Rock candy. [more inside]
posted by aniola on Dec 13, 2013 - 28 comments

Turduckens, Cockentrices and Helmeted Cocks

If you think turduckens are just too easy: Things inside things. Things on top of other things. Things that look like things. Things that do tricks, and other subtleties.
posted by Joe in Australia on Nov 26, 2013 - 21 comments

Stuffed.

Occurring once before in 1888 and possibly not again for another 77,798 years (really), the two holidays of Chanukah and Thanksgiving will overlap. The result? Chefs, food blogs, and nearly everybody else scrambling to create distinct fusion menus that draw from the delicious traditions of each holiday (NYT). Buzzfeed's massive Thanksgivukkah menu. Gothamist: Four Easy Fusion Dishes. Food 52's recipe challenge (in comments). Serious Eats' response ( Latke-Crusted Turkey Stuffing Fritters With Liquid Cranberry Core and Turkey Schmaltz Gravy) . NY Daily News asks Chef Zach Kutsher for ideas.
posted by The Whelk on Nov 7, 2013 - 61 comments

Like your Mother used to make

"It's about coming together as a local community and sharing the fruits of your labour, your creation." In what has been described as a peer-to-peer community marketplace, people are connecting online with local cooks, who provide them with a meal for less than they would be likely to pay anywhere else. In Athens, the price is usually between three and four euros (£2.50 to £3.40). [more inside]
posted by arcticseal on Sep 23, 2013 - 28 comments

The circuitous histories of hamburgers and ketchup

The history of the hamburger could be a relatively short story, or one spanning centuries and continents, depending on how far you disassemble the modern hamburger. If you look for the origins of ground meat between two pieces of bread, that's something American, but where and when exactly is the question. But how did we get the ground meat patty? You can thank the Mongols and Kublai Khan, who brought their ground meat to Russia. Oh, and don't forget the fish sauce! [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 19, 2013 - 35 comments

It's good to be the king.

On June 6th, 2013, Mel Brooks will be presented with the 41st AFI Life Achievement Award, but this post is about his Tomato and Onion Omelette. Bon Appétit talks cooking, coffee, and career with Mel Brooks, Omelette King.
posted by Room 641-A on May 19, 2013 - 23 comments

the true history of Pad Thai

"In between surviving multiple point-blank-range assassination attempts and a failed kidnapping in which he emerged alive from the burning wreckage of a battleship his own air force had just bombed, Pibulsongkram decided that Thailand needed noodles that would advance the country’s industry and economy."
posted by moonmilk on Feb 23, 2013 - 35 comments

Archie's Recipes

Archie's Recipes - When my grandparents passed away my family rediscovered an old family recipe book that my great grandfather wrote by hand in an old ledger. [via mefi projects]
posted by item on Jan 5, 2013 - 17 comments

Latkes

Hanukkah draws nigh and that means latkes. [The oil in which the potato pancake is cooked symbolizes the miraculously long-burning fuel that lit the Second Temple.] Bubala Please shows you how to keep it real. [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Dec 2, 2012 - 75 comments

Adventure Chef, c'mon tell your friends, we'll cook in very distant lands.

Rutabaga, a webcomic about an adventuring chef.
posted by curious nu on Nov 15, 2012 - 9 comments

Chicken Noodle Soup

The broth is just chicken and onions, with a confetti of vegetables added at the end where their flavor remains bright. The noodles are wide and winding... But, for me, the real triumph was giving the chicken parts and onion a saute... before adding water to make the soup. This deepened flavor base makes for magical soup, with a bronzed color, more robust flavor and significantly reduced prep time. ... With all of the blustery, cold days to go this winter, everyone... deserves to have a homemade, from-scratch chicken noodle soup that can be pulled off in just about an hour in their back pocket. [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Oct 10, 2012 - 57 comments

South American Recipes

Peru aside, South American cuisine does not get a lot of attention in the English-speaking world, but there are plenty of recipes out there which allow you to try the specialities from Colombia, Argentina & Chile in the comfort of your own home. Starting with the staple of Colombia and Venezuela and made from cornmeal / hominy, the arepa forms the basis of breakfast, lunch, dinner and anything in between. Basic arepa recipe. [more inside]
posted by jontyjago on Sep 20, 2012 - 55 comments

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (1918) by Goudiss and Goudiss
posted by aniola on Sep 13, 2012 - 37 comments

Kung Pao Chicken

Ding Baozhen (1820-1886) was a governor of Sichuan province during the Qing dynasty. The emperor bestowed upon him the title Gōng Bǎo - "palatial guardian". He supervised the reconstruction of the Dujiangyan Irrigation System. But he achieved immortality through the dish named for him: Kung Pao Chicken. [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Aug 30, 2012 - 18 comments

The Internet's Gift to Cooking: Recipe Aggregators

Ice Cubes - A Recipe. The comments offer many helpful tips.
posted by Miko on Aug 22, 2012 - 61 comments

Happy Birthday, Julia

Tomorrow would have been Julia Child's 100th birthday. To celebrate, PBS Digital Studios offers: Julia Child Remixed. They also have created a celebration page, complete with an infographic, recipes, quotes, videos and more. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Aug 14, 2012 - 52 comments

Chicken Wings

Buffalo chicken wings were invented by Teressa Bellissimo at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, New York in 1964. Americans will eat 25 billion of them this year - not a few of them at the 10th annual National Buffalo Wing Festival. Some people eat nothing else. Alton Brown steams his. But will any of them be more delicious than these Sriracha Garlic Wings?
posted by Egg Shen on Aug 7, 2012 - 121 comments

Eating the High Life

"Legalizing pot would, in addition to engendering medical miracles and rendering moot a large sector of illegal-drug-related crimes, allow quantum leaps in the world of cooking. Maybe if we all pray really hard to Jah, pot will one day infiltrate snooty haute cuisine and local artisanal eateries alike, all over America." GQ reports on some incredible edibles. [more inside]
posted by Chipmazing on Jul 2, 2012 - 64 comments

"And what were they serving at El Bulli? Water!"

Drive 8.7 km (5.4 miles) west of the municipality of Roses in Catalonia, Spain, and you'll get to the gates of the renowned avant-garde restaurant, El Bulli. Run by Ferran Adrià since 1987, the restaurant closed in 2012 due to Adrià and his partner Juli Soler losing a half million Euros a year on the restaurant and Adrià's cooking workshop in Barcelona. Slate's Noreen Malone wrote an article on the history of the "I Ate at El Bulli" piece, giving an overview of tropes that you could expect in an IAaEB piece, and you can browse images tagged "elbulli" on Flickr for snapshots of personal experiences. But for an extended look into what went into making the ever-changing 35-course taster's menu, El Bulli: Cooking in Progress (Trailer on YT and Vimeo) is a 109 minute documentary on the preparation and implementation of the 2008/9 season, an "extreme fly-on-the-wall vérité, with only the barest context provided." If you're looking for recipes, Molecular Recipes has a few listed under the El Bulli tag. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 4, 2012 - 26 comments

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Now I agree that to some people using half a kilo of chocolate to make 12 biscuits may seem excessive. But I can tell you I don't put a price on alleviating human suffering. - Nigella Lawson [more inside]
posted by Trurl on May 15, 2012 - 128 comments

Rub a greased palm along the bottom

For Super Tuesday, sardonic food writer Michael Procopio presents an excellent Rick-Santorum-themed cake recipe. [more inside]
posted by w0mbat on Mar 6, 2012 - 40 comments

Don't cook Sudafed in yo baby momma's house

In [the USA], buying a good over-the-counter nasal decongestant requires picking a card from an empty spot on the shelf, taking it to the pharmacist, handing over your driver's license, and getting it from behind the counter. Only the larger drug stores bother. Meth, on the other hand, is apparently easier to come by. So here (PDF), from the the wonderfully named Journal of Apocryphal Chemistry, is a paper on how to make Sudafed® from Meth.
posted by TheNewWazoo on Feb 28, 2012 - 58 comments

18th Century Pharmacopeia

A Cephalic Infusion
Take dry Peacocks dung (the white part) 4 ounces; Millepedes alive bruised 1 ounce; black Cherry water, white Wine, each 1 pint and half; let them stand cold 24 hours, then having clarify'd it, by often passing it through a Flannel bag; add Langius's Antepileptic water 3 ounces; Spirit of Lavender compound 1 dram and half; Oil of Nutmeg 3 drops; Syrup of Piony compound 6 ounces, mix.
It cleanses out the Meatus of the Brain, when choak'd up and grown unpassable, by reason of muddy Feculencies, roborates its Tone when flaccid and suck, and defecates the Animal Spirits, when clog'd and incens'd with an heterogeneous Copula, refreshes and invigorates them when feeble and fainting; discusses the Mists and Clouds of the Head, and procures Serenity and Sun shine. Therefore we employ it with happy Success in an Idiopathic Head-ach, Vertigo, Scotomy, &c. giving a quarter of a pint Nights and Mornings.
800 medicines from Thomas Fuller's Pharmacopeia Extemporanea, 168 from William Buchan's Domestic Medicine and 11 from The Reverend Twigge's Notebook - indexed and fully searchable.
posted by unliteral on Feb 22, 2012 - 30 comments

Or understand the deliciousness that jiaozi has

You can make jiaozi. But you can't make it like this. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Feb 14, 2012 - 29 comments

Belgian Fries

If you don’t use the right potatoes, the right oil, and the right fryers, well, you get french fries. And that’s the reason you don’t find Belgian fries anywhere. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Jan 4, 2012 - 113 comments

chicken and rice recipe

Now you can make the famous NYC halal style Chicken and Rice at home.
posted by AceRock on Dec 5, 2011 - 93 comments

Cooking with vahchef

Chef Sanjay Thumma (vahrehvah.com) wants to teach you how to make pretty much any Indian dish you can think of.
posted by curious nu on Nov 22, 2011 - 18 comments

With four and twenty black-and-white birds, here's the history of the pie

NPR's food blog gets wordy: for the origins of "pie," look to the humble magpie. Though the etymology of pie doesn't present one clear path, the possibilities are fascinating. English surnames point to pie and pye as a baked good in the 1300s, with a Peter Piebakere in 1320 and Adam le Piemakere in 1332. Chaucer referred to "pye" as both a baked good and a magpie (Google books). Or perhaps the fillings were like a magpie's collection of bits and bobs, similar to haggis. You know, like the French "agace," or magpie (Gb), and similar to chewets, those baked goods, or another name for jackdaws (Gb), relative of the magpie. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 22, 2011 - 21 comments

Carbonara

Pasta alla carbonara (usually spaghetti, but also fettuccine, rigatoni or bucatini) is an Italian pasta dish based on eggs, cheese (pecorino or parmesan), bacon (guanciale or pancetta), and black pepper. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Sep 20, 2011 - 105 comments

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