Join 3,376 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

32 posts tagged with rfid. (View popular tags)
Displaying 1 through 32 of 32. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (8)
+ (6)


Users that often use this tag:
Irontom (2)

Plotting the Future of Pallets

For more than half a century, pallet futurists have announced the next big thing, only to see the basic wooden variety remain the workhorse of global logistics. Pallets, previously.
posted by shoesfullofdust on May 26, 2014 - 34 comments

Do not fold, bend, spindle, or mutilate

Schools in Missouri, Maryland, and other states are using fingerprint scans and RFID chips to track students as a means to speed up service in the cafeteria and to track student whereabouts in and around school. [more inside]
posted by gauche on Oct 16, 2012 - 83 comments

NSFE (Not Safe For Electrosensitives)

Unless you are in an extremely remote location, your environment is likely filled with an invisible mesh of dozens of wireless signals, silently communicating. What would you see if that electronic aether was made visible? Some attempts to do just that: lightpainting the “electronic terrain” of WiFi in Oslo, “Immaterials”, visualizing the volume and shape of RFID signals, and a delightful little Rube Goldberg-esque film of devices and objects influencing each other in a chain reaction of nearfield wireless communication. Also: Wireless in the World and its sequel, along with Magnetic Movie.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Mar 5, 2011 - 18 comments

You have a drinking problem. We have data.

John Billes—whose extracurricular exploits as an undergraduate at UT Austin brought us iPhone-controlled dance floor lights, R/C cars, and yes, even full-size automobiles—has created the KegMatea keg-mounted, Arduino-controlled data-logging suite with an iPad-based user interface—in his spare time, while working at Yelp.
posted by defenestration on Aug 17, 2010 - 9 comments

Your tires sold you out, man!

Traffic cameras aren't required to track your driving. Researchers from Rutgers and USC have determined that low-pressure sensors in car tires can be passively read, tracking a vehicle's route.
posted by boo_radley on Aug 11, 2010 - 62 comments

Teat Tweet.

For one year, twelve cows on a dairy farm Twitter about their lactation cycle and robotic milking activities. [more inside]
posted by gman on May 3, 2010 - 49 comments

Cloning passport card RFIDs

Passport RFIDs cloned wholesale by $250 eBay auction spree. "Using inexpensive off-the-shelf components, an information security expert has built a mobile platform that can clone large numbers of the unique electronic identifiers used in US passport cards and next generation drivers licenses. The $250 proof-of-concept device - which researcher Chris Paget built in his spare time - operates out of his vehicle and contains everything needed to sniff and then clone RFID, or radio frequency identification, tags. During a recent 20-minute drive in downtown San Francisco, it successfully copied the RFID tags of two passport cards without the knowledge of their owners." [Via]
posted by homunculus on Feb 3, 2009 - 24 comments

Mythbusters Gagged

Mythbusters has been gagged about doing a new episode on the ease of hacking the new rfid enabled credit cards.
posted by DJWeezy on Aug 30, 2008 - 121 comments

Axis Of Agriculture

Axis of Agriculture: Tagging Terrorist Chickens If you worry about al-Qaeda infiltrating the Amish farming community or the organic food movement, you can finally relax.
posted by Freen on Jan 18, 2008 - 13 comments

Zeitgeist - Hegel would NOT be proud.

Zeitgeist, the movie [Google Video link embedded] - An interesthing, if bizarre, mix of buffed-up comparative mythology, 9/11 conspiracy theories and New world order rambling about banks, loans, debts and war. Is paranoia the spirit of our times?
posted by Baldons on Jul 26, 2007 - 32 comments

The low-tech way around RFID

The guy over at Make Your Nut is facing a dilemma I've wondered about myself: what to do about the security risks that are inherent in the many RFID-chipped credit and ATM cards that banks are so keen on issuing today? There's a lot of evidence out there that indicates that the highly personal information these cards (and the new US passports as well) carry can be stripped away by a thief with a little motivation and access to relatively low-cost equipment. You can go with the nifty RFID-blocking wallets (discussed here previously), or, according to some, you could just grab a hammer.
posted by shiu mai baby on Apr 30, 2007 - 26 comments

The latest in tinfoil hat fashion.

"Is Wi-Fi going to turn out to be the tobacco, asbestos or Thalidomide of the 21st century? It's looking that way." Woman choses to live in a Faraday cage to ameliorate the symptoms caused by electrosmog. It's funny that she looks so much like a beekeeper in her fancy hat, given the recent kerfuffle (from another UK paper) about mobile phones wiping out the bees. Coming soon: faraday undies. [via]
posted by scblackman on Apr 27, 2007 - 84 comments

Canadian Espionage?

Canadian spy monies?! The Defense Department has issued a warning to its American contractor employees. Apparently, Canadian coins have been outfitted with embedded RFID transmitters. Not the first instance of RFIDs in monies either. Explosive consequences. Elsewhere, whats the point? RFID previously on Metafilter.
posted by beta male on Jan 11, 2007 - 32 comments

Top ten missed foreign policy stories of 2006

The top ten stories you missed in 2006, according to Foreign Policy magazine. Items to concern the reflexive partisan from all parts of the spectrum. Cut 'n paste inside.
posted by wilful on Jan 7, 2007 - 34 comments

Tinfoil wallets anyone?

Technological convenience or target identifier? In the most recent chapter in the RFID + US Passport story, LA-based security analysts Flexilis--those of the world record attempt RFID read at last year's DEFCON--noticed a security vulnerability in the RF shielding being proposed for the October release of the next generation US passport. And they made a hell of a proof of concept video showing a possible exploit of the vulnerability.
posted by quite unimportant on Aug 3, 2006 - 24 comments

Wiring an Intelligent World

What is ubiquitous computing or "ubicomp," other than a geeky buzz-phrase for smart objects, "things that think"? In his provocative new book Everyware (freely excerpted here and here), interface designer and MeFite Adam Greenfield provides a thoughtful meditation on one of the digital world's most resonant hopes for the future, encompassing everything from pervasive RFID-chipping, Orwellian surveillance, and a humbly practical magic wand to a "coming age of calm technology."
posted by digaman on Jun 19, 2006 - 29 comments

DIY subcutaneous RFID tagging

People are tagging themselves, with microchips. [via] [previous]
posted by airguitar on Mar 25, 2006 - 11 comments

RFID wallets

RFID is a known security/privacy issue waiting to happen. Bruce Schneier even likes to talk about it on his blog. You can learn how to make your own tinfoil wallets. Or if you haven't the time... you could just purchase a premade one HERE. This vendor also has secure slips for US passports. Very nifty stuff.
posted by thecollegefear on Mar 9, 2006 - 51 comments

Amal of Borg.

Amal Graafstra has implanted two rfid chips into his hands to permit himself keyless access to his computer, car and home. He's also written a book about the experience and the various rfid "toys" he's devised. This Valentine's Day, he and his girlfriend expressed a "modern declaration of their affection for each other, with implanted electronic chips that allow them unfettered access to each other's lives". Interested in something similar? The company Amal used is selling a kit. Though they don't actually recommend it for use with medical implants. So, cool, crazy or inevitable?
posted by darkstar on Feb 17, 2006 - 21 comments

RFID+US Passport?

RFID+US Passport? By October 2006, the U.S. government will require nearly all of the passports it issues to include a computer chip containing the passport holder's personal information...
posted by yoga on Oct 27, 2005 - 41 comments

Heck... it works for our cattle

Brittan Elementary, a rural Californian school, has begun requiring their students to wear RFID tags manufactured by Alien Technology. This was done without parental consent and is mandatory. The ACLU is less than enthusiastic.
posted by cedar on Feb 13, 2005 - 28 comments

Earmarked

Visitors to the US tagged with RFID chips? They already use them on goods and livestock, but soon also foreign visitors will be earmarked. Will it make the US a safer country?
posted by kika on Jan 27, 2005 - 34 comments

RFID to track students in Spring, Texas...

RFID to track students in Spring, Texas... the information is fed automatically by wireless phone to the police and school administrators. That's right: constant and continual monitoring of all the schoolkids in the district by the local police department.
posted by Irontom on Nov 17, 2004 - 74 comments

Won't somebody think of the children?

Won't somebody think of the children? Wired News reports that a Mexican company has launched a service to implant RFID verichips (Technology That Cares) into children as an anti-kidnapping device. "The company envisions placing walk-through scanners -- similar to metal-detector portals used in airports -- in malls, bus stations and other areas where a missing child may appear." Similar plans have been proposed before by the UK's Kevin "Captain Cyborg" Warwick, but while his plans to use the mobile phone network are implausible, this method seems more feasible. So, why not sign up to get chipped today!
posted by TheophileEscargot on Oct 10, 2003 - 14 comments

RFID: Taking Away Your Privacy One Product at a Time

We've discussed it before, but RFID, that fun-loving little radio transmitter that can be attached to everything from that stereo system to a carton of milk, is plowing ahead faster than you can say "unregulated." Earlier this year, Wal-Mart issued a mandate that required its top 100 suppliers to include RFIDs on their merchandise by 2005, bringing new meaning to the phrase "panties in a bunch." (Incidentally, Wal-Mart was also the benign corporation that ushered in bar codes for mass consumption in the late 70s and early 80s.) With no regulations on the table, the New York Times reports that the Defense Department plans to issue a statement requiring all suppliers to use RFID. Hitachi has even offered to put it in your currency. Imagine a store a few years from now that can track all of the objects in your cart, and that, thanks to a microscopic RFID stuck to your shoe when you slide through the doors, can determine how many seconds you or your children react to a display. Imagine a world that tracks exactly where each one of your dollar bills go. (So much for the anonymity of johns and porn enthusiasts.) Is this the kind of world we want to abdicate to large retail corporations? Is this the kind of information that governments or private institutions are entitled to know? Discuss.
posted by ed on Sep 29, 2003 - 96 comments

Universal Surveillance, Inc.

RFID tagging and tracking plans (mirror 1, mirror 2) With the tag line "Identify Any Object Anywhere Automatically", this group (the MIT Auto-ID Center) is leading the way into our bold new future of total tracking. {Originally uncovered by CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering)}
posted by Irontom on Jul 8, 2003 - 18 comments

RFID

Is RFID inherently Evil? Not a chip in your body, like EvilCorp Applied Digital Solutions proposes, but in your household products, your clothes, and your car. And it's here now. With almost no law anywhere to restrict its use. But then again, how often do you use products made or sold by Benetton, Prada, British retailer Tesco, Proctor & Gamble, and Wal-Mart? Phillips Semiconductor alone has already sold half a Billion of these chips.
posted by kablam on Mar 11, 2003 - 34 comments

The Mark of the Beast?

The Mark of the Beast? After the quick FDA approval of implantable human chips , Applied Digital Solutions , the manufacturer of the chips, has already launched a national campaign with the tagline "Get Chipped", and people are lining up. Other's are afraid, for one reason or another.
posted by Espoo2 on Oct 25, 2002 - 28 comments

Tired of trying to flag down a waitron?

Tired of trying to flag down a waitron? Here's one solution. But if you want a different drink, you're probably back to yer old aerobics routine.
posted by datawrangler on May 29, 2002 - 43 comments

Hmmmmm - Beer....

Hmmmmm - Beer.... Genuine need or Science gone mad?
posted by Spoon on Apr 4, 2002 - 14 comments

Get Chipped!

Get Chipped! A Brazilian legislator wants to become the first politician to be implanted with a controversial microchip that would contain his personal information. Hmmm, would the real Kevin Warwick please stand up.
posted by nakedjon on Feb 15, 2002 - 3 comments

Not embedded in your hand, just your credit card.

Not embedded in your hand, just your credit card. Your Providian VISA with Smart Chip Technology comes with a smart chip that's embedded on the front of the credit card. Soon, a smart chip will let you store information and applications that make shopping easier and more secure. Anyone here a little leary of this kind of "smart"ness? Thoughts?
posted by thunder on Jul 3, 2001 - 23 comments

Page: 1