5 posts tagged with richardburton.
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Dick Cavett’s Worst Show

Promoting his new book Brief Encounters, talkshow host Dick Cavett appears on CBC's Sunday Edition with Michael Enright. Cavett recounts to Michael Enright about a legendary on-air donnybrook between Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer in 1971 on his show, a frank discussion with Richard Burton about alcoholism, being singled out by Richard Nixon for revenge, and Dick Cavett's worst show.
posted by Nevin on Nov 2, 2014 - 20 comments

Orson, you're behaving like an asshole.

In the early eighties, Orson Welles was a fixture at L.A.’s Ma Maison, where Wolfgang Puck was the chef before he moved on to Spago. Nearing 70, and 40-plus years removed from Citizen Kane, which he made when he was just 25, Welles was fat and famously difficult, no longer a viable star but still a sort of Hollywood royalty—a very certain sort. The younger director Henry Jaglom was one of many aspiring auteurs who admired him but possibly the only one who taped their conversations. These took place in 1983 over lunch at the restaurant.
posted by The Whelk on Jun 25, 2013 - 67 comments

"450,000 handwritten words recounting his innermost thoughts and fears"

Actor Richard Burton's diaries were published last fall, and are reviewed: Richard Burton Was A Great Writer, Richard Burton's Notes To A Modern Journaler, The Great Actor Who Hated Acting, For Love Of Lit And Liz [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 28, 2013 - 11 comments

Opening Night at La Scala

GlamourFilter: Opening Night at La Scala. Pictures from La Scala's opening nights, dating through the fifties and sixties. (Main story here, slideshow here, those links in Italian, but easy enough to figure out for non-speakers.) Pictures of Callas, Toscanini, Princess Grace, Dick and Liz, and many more, all looking impossibly fab and glamourous. (Via the always informative and entertaining Opera Chic.)
posted by Capt. Renault on Dec 13, 2012 - 10 comments


Tennessee Williams said it was the best film version of any of his plays. Roger Ebert called it "awkward and hopeless on its most fundamental level". John Waters calls it a major influence on the development of his taste. [more inside]
posted by Joe Beese on Feb 18, 2009 - 14 comments

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