616 posts tagged with rock.
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The Club Is Open

Robert Pollard has reformed Guided by Voices with a new lineup. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Feb 10, 2016 - 25 comments

There's only power, BIM is the power.

In 1980, Menahem Golan showed us a harrowing vision of the power of rock...in 1994 The Apple is a futuristic, dystopian disco rock musical that also manages to be a druggy, sexy biblical allegory. [more inside]
posted by Senor Cardgage on Feb 5, 2016 - 44 comments

Raw Power: From Iggy and the Stooges to AMD and Blu-ray

The Leap: The Improbable Transformation of a Punk Pioneer (mp3) - "James Williamson is a successful tech executive who's been working in Silicon Valley for decades. But it turns out Williamson had a secret, something that no one working with him knew. He was a pioneer in a type of music that is about as far from the tech world as you can get." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jan 31, 2016 - 24 comments

Chrindie '95

Chrindie '95: A collection of essays about a seminal year in Christian indie rock. [via mefi projects].
1995 was also an incredibly important year for the scene we've come to call “Chrindie,” for Christian indie rock. Much has been written about the weird world of contemporary Christian music, but whatever you think it is ,  you’d be surprised by how many genuinely great Chrindie records were released twenty years ago. During the course of the year, we’ve been writing about brilliant, beautiful, challenging, difficult, weird albums that went mostly unnoticed by mainstream radio and the music press and MTV, in part because they were released on tiny labels with no budgets and marketed primarily to evangelical teenagers in the suburbs.
[more inside] posted by naju on Dec 23, 2015 - 28 comments

One great rock show can change the world

Indie auteur Richard Linklater pleasantly surprised audiences with his charming 2003 comedy School of Rock, in which a struggling musician (High Fidelity co-star and Tenacious D frontman Jack Black) hijacks a 4th grade prep school class and inspires them to become a killer rock band. Buoyed by likeable characters, a great soundtrack, remarkably talented kid musicians, and Black's lengthy, irrepressible, almost improvisational classroom scenes, the film earned rave reviews and inspired scads of copycat programs around the world (as featured in the '05 documentary and reality series Rock School). But while the cast kicked ass at their ten-year reunion concert in 2013, plans for a sequel fell through. Everyone loves an encore, though. And so this weekend saw the Broadway debut of the Andrew Lloyd Webber stage musical starring Alex Brightman, with a TV adaptation to air on Nickelodeon next year. Because there's no way you can stop... the School of Rock. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Dec 7, 2015 - 37 comments

Promises of what I seemed to be

Scott Weiland, Ex-Singer of Stone Temple Pilots, Dies at 48. The troubled singer died in his sleep on a tour stop in Minnesota. Weiland, who had been fired from STP, was in his third act, comparing himself to Keith Richards, and had lost a bandmate earlier in the year. Weiland rose to stardom 23 years ago with STP's debut Core. [more inside]
posted by graymouser on Dec 4, 2015 - 117 comments

Punk Crock

Punk, we greasy teens soon learned, was once the rightful province of a worthy few able to discern reality from simulacrum, irony from sincerity, punks from poseurs, shit from Shinola. Punk was diametrically opposed to massification; like an ailing Victorian child, it would die if exposed to the slavering crowd.
posted by latkes on Nov 20, 2015 - 42 comments

None of them wanna pay taxes again. Ever.

The Asteroid Hunters
posted by zarq on Nov 17, 2015 - 23 comments

That's the way I like It baby, I Don't Wanna Live Forever...

Philthy Animal Taylor, drummer for Motorhead's golden age lineup*, has passed away. RIP, you Philthy bastard. *this clip shows that along with being a great drummer, he could really cut a rug
posted by jonmc on Nov 12, 2015 - 41 comments

I fought the law, and the law won (unless it didn't)

Outlaw songs are at least as old as popular music itself. The image of a gallant loner battling a rigid and unyielding legal establishment has proved irresistible for generations of songwriters. In 1959, Texan Sonny Curtis wrote one of the best, "I Fought The Law." Intended as a vehicle for himself and the post-Buddy Holly Crickets, their single went precisely nowhere.
That is, until it was covered -- the first hit cover was by The Bobby Fuller Four in 1965, then another major version came out 14 years later, from The Clash who revived the "oldie" into what is now a "punk anthem." From there, the covers start piling up.... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 11, 2015 - 29 comments

67 Year-Old Grindcore-Singing Mom Is Way More Brutal Than You

Known only as The Grindmother, she is a 67 year-old Canadian woman who has taken up grindcore music and her demonic wailing will peel the paint off your walls. Why the Grindmother is the greatest thing to happen to grindcore in 2015. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Nov 10, 2015 - 41 comments

Deep down Louisiana close to New Orleans

Chuck Berry was born in 1926. Here he is performing Johnny B Goode: The date is April 14, 2014.
posted by growabrain on Oct 24, 2015 - 21 comments

웃 i am not here and this is not really happening.

After the triumph of OK Computer, Radiohead fell into a creative tailspin -- and frontman Thom Yorke into a nervous breakdown. Exhausted from touring, hounded by press, and jaded by copycats, he escaped into the electronica scene pioneered by Kraftwerk and Warp Records -- fertile ground, the band discovered. Trading spacey rock for apocalyptic brooding, they teased their new sound not with singles or music videos but with innovative web streaming and cryptic, dreamlike "blips" -- winterlands, flocks of cubes, eyeballs, bears. After nearly breaking up over tracklist angst, they cut the kid in half. Thus fifteen years ago today, Kid A and (later) Amnesiac debuted, a confounding mix of electronic fugue, whalesong, pulsing IDM, drunken piano, and epic jazz funeral whose insights into anxiety, political dysfunction, and climate crisis would make it one of the most revered albums of the twenty-first century. See the documentary Reflections on Kid A for interviews and live cuts, or look inside for much more. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Oct 2, 2015 - 63 comments

Rise of the female rock memoir

It’s an all-girl supergroup like no other: Pretenders leader Chrissie Hynde, Jamaican-born singer Grace Jones, Sleater-Kinney guitarist and “Portlandia” star Carrie Brownstein, folkie Jewel, punk poet Patti Smith and 1970s icon Carly Simon. Only these women aren’t reviving Lilith Fair. They’re part of the latest trend in book publishing. In a genre once wholly dominated by male rockers, female musicians are now finding their voices — and their book deals.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Sep 5, 2015 - 30 comments

“...a sinister flirtation with minimalist funk,”

Deerhunter - Snakeskin [YouTube] Atlanta art-rock band Deerhunter announced its seventh LP, Fading Frontier, Sunday, and premiered the abstract video for its lead single, "Snakeskin." Fading Frontier comes out Oct. 16 on 4AD. via: NPR Music
posted by Fizz on Aug 17, 2015 - 7 comments

Ladies and Gentlemen, This is Tom Jones

Courtesy of Turkish YouTube user Burç Arda Gül, highlights from This is Tom Jones, a variety show that ran on ATV in the UK and ABC in the US from 1969-1971.
Raise Your Hand, with Janis Joplin
Delta Lady, with Joe Cocker
Medley, with Stevie Wonder
Any Place I Hang My Hat Is Home, with Tony Bennett
I Walk the Line, with Johnny and June Carter Cash
Hard to Handle, with some enthusiastic audience members.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Aug 15, 2015 - 30 comments

We go down to the indie disco every Thursday night

Irish indie rock: kinda like Scottish indie rock, but way less beards. Have you thought about Irish indie rock since the glory days of Ash, Mundy and My Bloody Valentine? There's more than U2 and Hozier happening in the Emerald Isle. [more inside]
posted by banjo_and_the_pork on Aug 3, 2015 - 6 comments

A legendary rock and roll club named after a hamster

An Oral History of TT The Bear's The legendary Cambridge, MA rock club has closed after a months long blowout\wake. Opened in 1981 as a restaurant, when Central Square was still a no-man's land between Harvard and MIT, blighted by urban decay and suburban flight, the venue was soon rebooted as a rock club and soon joined the Rathskellar, the Channel and The Middle East as one of a small group of independent venues that functioned as an incubator for 90s icons such as The Magnetic Fields, Tanya Donnelly, Galaxie 500, Letters to Cleo and, of course, the Pixies. [more inside]
posted by bl1nk on Jul 26, 2015 - 18 comments

Star Wars: Wilco Edition

Wilco have released a new album called "Star Wars", featuring 11 new original songs, free for a limited time on their website.
posted by anazgnos on Jul 16, 2015 - 37 comments

The Thunder From Down Under

Starting in the late 70s and throughout the 80s, Australian Rock strode the earth like a tiny, screaming colossus. Whether Hard Rock (drummer convicted of death threats), Pop Rock (lead singer dead from autoerotic aspyxiation), Pub Rock (lead singer's kids no longer forced to play), or what we'd now call Indie (they broke up, get over it) the 80s was the high water mark in Aus/NZ music history.Then the nineties and naughties ushered in an ero of reality-TV driven drivel... [more inside]
posted by Neale on Jul 15, 2015 - 80 comments

My friends all drive Porsches, I must make amends...

The Story Behind Janis Joplin’s ‘Mercedes Benz’
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 8, 2015 - 36 comments

Please taste and enjoy many Japaneese products

Enjoy! Best in translation.
posted by vrakatar on Jul 7, 2015 - 30 comments

"People in 2015 shouldn't be able to get away with things like this ..."

There was a thought that there weren’t enough bands with guitars that were exciting in the same way as the bands we cared about so we had the thought let’s try and do it better ourselves ... What I wanted that was something post-punk or whatever you want to call it but with songs. There was a while there where I wasn’t hearing any songs.
Formed in 2013, North London band Desperate Journalist take their name from an obscure 1979 beef between The Cure and the NME's Paul Morley. Together, they make jangly, intense indie pop, redolent of faded seaside resorts, cramped book-filled bedsits, and English winter chill. Their debut album, Desperate Journalist [Spotify], appeared earlier this year. [Youtube.] [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Jul 7, 2015 - 21 comments

"Why did I write so much about this shit. Who cares. Enjoy!"

Giant 800-track alt/indie-focused 90's playlist in chronological order "This is a behemoth of a playlist I put together, focusing primarily (but not exclusively) on the alt/indie/college side of the 90's experience. It's 800+ tracks, about 55 hours, and features plenty of songs that tend to get overlooked in the "remember these 90's hits?" pieces that pop up from time to time. Not definitive by any means, and extremely subjective, but it's a decent chunk of curated history in one convenient place. Also it's a fully chronological playlist, on a week-by-week level. So a track released on May 7, 1994 will come before a track released on May 14, 1994. Time and research went into this. Think of it as the Boyhood of 90's playlists!" (From Mefi's own naju, via MetaFilter Projects.)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jun 28, 2015 - 96 comments

I’m a woman who writes about rock and roll

"The record store, the guitar shop, and now social media: when it comes to popular music, these places become stages for the display of male prowess. Female expertise, when it appears, is repeatedly dismissed as fraudulent. Every woman who has ever ventured an opinion on popular music could give you some variation (or a hundred) on my school corridor run-in, and becoming a recognized 'expert' (a musician, a critic) will not save you from accusations of fakery." The World Needs Female Rock Critics, by Anwen Crawford for the New Yorker. Discussed in the piece is Jessica Hopper's new collection of essays, The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic, which has been greeted with glowing praise. Here's an interview she did with Hazlitt: 'Am I Womansplaining To You?' And here she speaks to Meredith Graves of Perfect Pussy: "Being a fangirl is all the qualification you need. And don't wait for anyone to give you permission. They won't. And you should do it anyways." [more inside]
posted by naju on May 26, 2015 - 11 comments

the most emotionally affecting music is what was popular when I was 13

25 One-Hit Wonders From The '90s & Early 2000s You Totally Forgot Existed [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 20, 2015 - 245 comments

In search of One Lost Day

As the release of their first album in four years draws near, 30-year folk/rock veterans Indigo Girls welcome you into the process with behind-the-scenes videos for upcoming songs Happy In The Sorrow Key, Come A Long Way, The Rise Of The Black Messiah, and If I Don't Leave Here Now. They also offer up a studio track to preview: Learned It On Me.
posted by hippybear on May 12, 2015 - 4 comments

I Know You Can't Control Yourself Any Longer

What Is 'Mom Rock'?
posted by The Whelk on May 8, 2015 - 166 comments

Probably the first time Cromagnon has been mentioned in the NYT

Bernard Stollman, founder of the influential, otherworldly ESP-Disk label, has passed away this week at 85. New York Times obituary. The independent label was home to blazing, provocative recordings from avant-jazz greats like Albert Ayler, Ornette Coleman, and Sun Ra, as well as underground rock outsiders like the Godz, the Holy Modal Rounders, and the Fugs. The label's discography is deep, strange, and still largely unexplored by everyone but hardcore music geeks (who tend to be highly passionate about it). From Stereogum: Remembering Bernard Stollman: 10 Essential ESP-Disk Albums.
posted by naju on Apr 24, 2015 - 24 comments

"Nothing is forbidden anymore." —Enrique Iglesias, "Bailamos"

The boys ... are back. [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Mar 23, 2015 - 62 comments

And I will think no more

If we're all quite aware of what it has become, then where did it come from? From Jack White’s guitar of course, and from his fingers and his brain. But what about the sequence of notes? Could they have been hanging around in the universe since the cosmic microwave background splurged into existence, just waiting to be aligned by a malleable composer? Speaking to the BBC last year, Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine said: "It's less a riff that feels like someone wrote it than it was unearthed. It's something that's always been there, and it's something that speaks to the reptilian brain of rock listeners."Stupid & Sophisticated: The Rise & Rise Of The Seven Nation Army Riff
posted by timshel on Mar 20, 2015 - 63 comments

Waltzing around

Shake It Little Tina: Dance by Adam Carpenters and a rock-n-roll song by duo Low Cut Connie
posted by growabrain on Mar 14, 2015 - 8 comments

Jim O’Rourke Live in Tokyo in June of 2014 [Part 1] [Part 2] Jim O’Rourke Plays “Women of the World” (Live on Christmas Day, 2013). Jim O’Rourke at Work on the Grizzly Man Soundtrack; Special Appearance by Werner Herzog. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 19, 2015 - 7 comments

Music Video with thrash and humorous elements

IRON REAGAN - "Miserable Failure" (SLYT)
posted by josher71 on Feb 4, 2015 - 25 comments

Do you read Sutter Cane? No? Oh, he's good, check him out. Well, bye

The Wall Street Journal celebrates the 20th anniversary of John Carpenter's In The Mouth of Madness. Meanwhile, at VICE, John Carpenter wouldn't explain his new album, so they got a bunch of artists to each provide their own interpretation.
posted by Sticherbeast on Feb 4, 2015 - 27 comments

2 bassists, 2 clarinets, 1 cellist, 1 tape-delay technician, 1 pianist

Bing & Ruth is a modern classical ensemble that plays minimalist, piano-driven music. Several videos from Tomorrow Was The Golden Age (RVNG Intl.), their 2014 album, are on Youtube: Warble, TWTGA, Police Police Police Police Police, The Towns We Love Is Our Town (Alternate), and Reflector. Their first album, City Lake, can be streamed on Soundcloud. The Bing & Ruth and Kenitle Floors EPs can be streamed on Bandcamp.
B&R is the project of David Moore, who also leads (parodic?) bluegrass band The Piledrivers and country band Pepper Johnson, and is member of experimental electronic group Emar Diem and blues rockers Langhorne Slim & The Law. In October, Will Stephenson interviewed Moore for BOMB. In 2010, Le Blogotheque released a short film of Moore set to his music.
posted by Going To Maine on Dec 19, 2014 - 8 comments

They still do not sell t-shirts.

27 years after their recording, Fugazi gives their first set of demos an official release. Alternative Press checks in with an appreciation (with SoundCloud streams of the entire release). The Washington Post recounts the band's early years. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Nov 21, 2014 - 37 comments

Outlaw gentlemen with guitars and harmonicas

Volbeat are a "rockabilly metal band" from Copenhagen. Formed in 2001, they list among their influences Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash, along with many metal and punk bands. Some particularly rocking cuts inside, to help you get through Monday afternoon. [more inside]
posted by jbickers on Nov 17, 2014 - 8 comments

Add it up and there outta be more

So wait, there's a band with Jim Jarmusch on keys and a bunch of experimental Horror film directors that released a record in the early 80s of spooky surf-funk and you're NOT listening to it today? Get on it y'all. It's the story of The Del-Byzanteens. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Oct 31, 2014 - 8 comments

" ... and what a stunning voice it is"

We wanted to create something quite muscular and meaty. I was getting a little disenchanted with boring wet music. I wanted something with some kind of punch to it ...
Esben and the Witch formed in 2008 after neophyte guitarist Thomas Fisher bumped into old friend Rachel Davies on the street in Brighton and asked if she'd like to be in a band. Together with multi-instrumentalist Daniel Copeman, they started making a kind of bruised, ghostly electro goth-pop that drew comparisons with dubstep and witch house. Then things changed. Their third album, A New Nature, recorded with Steve Albini after a successful Kickstarter campaign, sees the band step away from their electro-pop origins, combining English-major Davies' lyrical obsessions with Herman Hesse and Jack London with the band's love of uncompromising noise, psych, and transcendent post rock. A New Nature, released last month, can be streamed via Stereogum.
posted by Sonny Jim on Oct 24, 2014 - 11 comments

Don't Let's Stop

Why is the world in love again?
Why are we marching hand in hand?
Why are the ocean levels rising up?
It's a brand new record
for nineteen-ninety,
They Might Be Giants' brand new album:
FLOOD (43m)
Or, if you'd rather meet James Ensor, there's John Henry (57m)! For something Fingertippy, there's Apollo 18 (43m)! More recent: Nanobots (45m) - Join Us (47m) - The Else (38m) (Official links from the band's YouTube channel! Oh, and they also have a podcast.) [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Oct 20, 2014 - 48 comments

With a Little Help From My Fwends

One week from today, The Flaming Lips will release their full album cover of The Beatles' iconic Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. NPR is now streaming the entire record for preview. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 20, 2014 - 47 comments

They are, once again, your Joey Ramone

On October 21, Sub-Pop will be releasing Get Up, a vinyl box set of remastered versions of Sleater-Kinney's discography. Included with the expected content was a 7" labeled 1/20/15 containing a new song. Titled "Bury Your Friends", it can be streamed at Consequence of Sound. Plugged into Shazam, the song gives you the cover art for an as-yet non-extant album, No Cities To Love. The band has officially let the cat out of the bag, and reunion tour dates are on their website.
posted by Going To Maine on Oct 20, 2014 - 62 comments

"It just doesn't seem quite fair."

Is Sampling Tom Petty Like Plagiarizing from Moby-Dick? [SLYT] Mini-documentary on 'sampling' circa 1989.
posted by Fizz on Oct 18, 2014 - 24 comments

I Can't Give Anymore

Hailed as successors to The Beatles, the British band Badfinger had an extended stay in Milwaukee—a bizarre nightmare from which it never recovered. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Oct 15, 2014 - 23 comments

Blondie Is a Group!

Dazed by the recent Blondie retrospective at the (former) Chelsea Hotel? Celebrate Blondie at 40 with some music videos : = Dreaming Union City Blues Hanging on the Telephone Rip Her to Shreds Heart Of Glass (modern retake) Denis X Offender Atomic Rapture The Tide Is High One Way Or Another
posted by The Whelk on Oct 7, 2014 - 26 comments

If it ain't broke, break it: the unspoken motto of The Kinks

"HH [Henry Hauser]: Ryan and Nina are right on target. The Ray-Dave sibling rivalry sparked many of The Kinks' most spontaneous (and brilliant) musical moments. The Storyteller, Ray's riveting account of early life in the Davies household and his band’s rise to prominence, has him describing how he and Dave exchanged scornful looks while recording "You Really Got Me". The elder Davies swears that if you listen closely, you can actually hear Dave yelling "Fuckkkoffff" right before his guitar solo. Ray salvaged the track by covering up Dave's profane exclamation with his own unscripted outburst ("Owwwww noooooo!"), and the impromptu rock scream turned into one of the most memorable quirks in Kinks history. It perfectly captures the animalistic agony that accompanies hopeless infatuation. Without the Ray-Dave rivalry, it would never have happened."

Henry Hauser, Ryan Bray, Nina Corcoran, and Stevie Dunbar at Consequence of Sound hold a round-table discussion in "Dusting 'Em Off: The Kinks – The Kinks". [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 7, 2014 - 28 comments

Don't Follow Me (I'm Lost)

Born to Nashville music royalty. Grew up next to George Jones and Tammy Wynette. Had a #2 record on the country charts at age eight. Had a minor alt-rock hit for the same major label as Korn and Incubus in his 30's. His mentor was Shel Silverstein. One of his bands, The Young Criminals Starvation League has featured members of My Morning Jacket, Lambchop, ...And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead, Clem Snide, and myriad others. His other band Is She Weird? Is She White? plays Pixies and Breeders covers on weekends in Nashville. Unless he's opening for Guided by Voices or playing someone's living room. Or delivering lost luggage to pay the bills.

It's a hell of a life singer-songwriter Bobby Bare, Jr. has had. It's only makes sense that someone went and made a movie about him: Don't Follow Me (I'm Lost). Sample the trailer. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Sep 24, 2014 - 17 comments

100 Bass Riffs ... but no Big Bottom

100 Bass Riffs: A Brief of Groove on Bass and Drums. From the folks at Chicago Music Exchange who previously brought you 100 Riffs (A Brief History of Rock N' Roll).
posted by wabbittwax on Sep 12, 2014 - 24 comments

"our healthy but preposterous need to make lists"

The Perfect Beat is an article by The New Yorker's music critic Sasha Frere Jones where he lays out the reasoning behind his "Perfect Recordings" project, essentially a list of 200 songs that fit his personal criteria for perfection. The lists are available as Twitter timelines (volumes 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5), Spotify playlists (volumes 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5) or as one 200 song Rdio playlist. Frere-Jones answered some questions about the project and spoke about a few individual songs in The Guardian.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 8, 2014 - 46 comments

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