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31 posts tagged with royalties.
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Hey Mom, my song is in 'Orange is the New Black'

Recently, the song "Bitchin' Camaro" by the band The Dead Milkmen was featured during the closing credits of an episode of the Netflix series "Orange is the New Black". Because the Universe is entirely devoid of pity, this somehow led to a mildly profound and deeply disturbing discussion between lead singer Rodney "Anonymous" Linderman's mother and himself on the nature of "selling out".
posted by item on Jun 19, 2014 - 97 comments

Imagine the Ramones led by John Cage and managed by Andy Warhol

Who says you can't make money as a musician in the 21st century? Ann Arbor funk band Vulfpeck have figured out how to use Spotify royalties to fund their tour, enabling fans to attend shows for free. [more inside]
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Apr 4, 2014 - 30 comments

Takin' a break from all your worries sure would help a lot...

Interview with Cheers theme songwriter Gary Portnoy.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Mar 28, 2014 - 25 comments

Meine Tantiemen

Adolf Hitler was one of the richest authors of all time. But how rich was he and who gets his royalties today?
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Jan 16, 2014 - 44 comments

Every Penny You Make

Sting makes $2,000 a day because Puffy Daddy and his record label didn't bother clearing the rights when they sampled "Every Breath You Take" for "I'll Be Missing You." Even though Andy Summers wrote the guitar line that you hear. It's still a sensitive subject.
posted by goatdog on Jan 6, 2014 - 126 comments

In The Jungle

"Mbube", a song that morphed into "The Lion Sleeps Tonight", illustrates the convoluted legalities surrounding music publishing rights and payments.
posted by reenum on Dec 11, 2013 - 19 comments

That's what I waaaaaa-aaaaaa-aaaa-aaaa-aaant, yeah

You've more than likely heard this early recording of Money by the Beatles, or perhaps this version by the Rolling Stones. But Barrett Strong, the man who originally recorded it and who was the primary songwriter hasn't shared in the millions of dollars the song has earned over the years.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Sep 2, 2013 - 30 comments

Fracking After the Boom

Chesapeake, the largest natural gas producer in Pennsylvania, is losing money. The current low price of gas will leave the company around $4 Billion in the red this year. Part of their response is to use a recent state Supreme Court ruling to justify charging landowners for the drilling and transportation expenses involved in extraction, reducing or eliminating all royalties. What was once a windfall to Pennsylvania communities is now becoming a burden, with Chesapeake now retroactively billing landowners for previous expenses. StateImpact Pennsylvania has written and recorded a thorough report on the issue.
posted by Toekneesan on Jun 29, 2013 - 79 comments

Opening Pandora's music box

A couple of days ago song writer David Lowery blogged about the low royalty rates streaming music service Pandora paid him, compared to terrestrial broadcasters: "My Song Got Played On Pandora 1 Million Times and All I Got Was $16.89, Less Than What I Make From a Single T-Shirt Sale". Understandably, this caused a bit of a commotion in music blogging circles, but perhaps this was unjustified. Michael Degusta does some digging and finds out that actually, Pandora paid $1,370 for these million plays in royalties. He also explains that Pandora actually pays more royalties than terrestrial radio stations.
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 27, 2013 - 60 comments

Cocaine's A Hell Of A Drug

Sly Stone's history of drug addiction and eccentricity is well known. But, a recent California Court of Appeals ruling details how a series of ill advised business deals left Stone destitute. [more inside]
posted by reenum on Jun 16, 2013 - 41 comments

"...the ways in which musicians are screwed have changed qualitatively, from individualized swindles to systemic ones."

"The "Tugboat" 7" single, Galaxie 500's very first release, cost us $980.22 for 1,000 copies-- including shipping! (Naomi kept the receipts)-- or 98 cents each. I no longer remember what we sold them for, but obviously it was easy to turn at least a couple bucks' profit on each. Which means we earned more from every one of those 7"s we sold than from the song's recent 13,760 plays on Pandora and Spotify. Here's yet another way to look at it: Pressing 1,000 singles in 1988 gave us the earning potential of more than 13 million streams in 2012."
Making Cents: Damon Krukowski of Galaxie 500 and Damon & Naomi breaks down the meager royalties currently being paid out to bands by streaming services and explains what the music business' headlong quest for capital means for artists today. [more inside]
posted by anazgnos on Nov 15, 2012 - 85 comments

you've heard him a million times, but he ain't no millionaire

Give the drummer some? Nuh-uh. PAY the drummer some! Living Legend Tries to Make a Living. I'm talking about the man who gave us the drum solo (at 5:35) that launched a thousand hip hop ships, James Brown's funky heartbeat, Clyde Stubblefield. [previously].
posted by flapjax at midnite on Mar 29, 2011 - 36 comments

25% of streaming music royalties aren't getting to the artists

1. Create a record label named "Unknown."
2. Form a band named "Various Artists."
3. (step 3 not required)
4. PROFIT!
No, really: Please take your royalty check Royalties are piling up from digital music streams, and a nonprofit has to track down artists who don't know. Then it has to convince them it's not a scam.
posted by planetkyoto on Mar 12, 2010 - 20 comments

Unusual Public Offering

When a young company is in need of some dough, they often will issue an IPO. But what if, instead of a company, an author decides to sell shares of his book royalties? Tao Lin is doing exactly that. [more inside]
posted by thatbrunette on Aug 2, 2008 - 45 comments

Se necesita una poca de gracia

"I mean he quite literally -- and in no way do I exaggerate when I say -- [Paul Simon] stole the songs from us." [more inside]
posted by Sys Rq on Apr 19, 2008 - 75 comments

Render unto Bono

Ethically in my opinion, Bono’s tax arrangements are entirely inconsistent with his calls upon government to support anti-poverty drives,” said Richard Murphy, one of three co-authors of the SOMO report (.pdf) on Dutch tax shelters. “You cannot be demanding that resources be allocated to anti-poverty drives and then deny those resources to government.”
posted by four panels on Feb 4, 2007 - 86 comments

Where's Wando?

Sound Exchange Can't Find Wall of Voodoo Who else can't they find? Charles Mingus, Archers of Loaf, Art Blakey, T. Rex, Brand Nubian, Art Blakey, and thousands of others. The link is comprhensive list of the "missing," which is a long list indeed, but includes many who aren't that hard to find. Nashville entertainment lawyer Fred Wilhelms has tried to help SoundExchange as he has written about at least twice in Counterpunch. SoundExchange is the organization put together by the R1AA and the major entertainnment companies to collect royalties for streaming (Internet, DMX, XM) radio performances protected by copyright and to distribute it to the artists. These, indeed, are some of the royalties that could be going to artists, if only SoundExchange could find them. Unfortunately, many artists will not be getting pizzaid for performances from 1996-2000 if they do not register with SoundExchange by December 15 of this year (2006). SoundExchange was chartered to find these artists or their estates, but apparently they aren't looking very hard. Why? Because if the artists don't register, SoundExchange (read: R1AA and their corporate partners) GET TO KEEP IT!.
posted by beelzbubba on Oct 21, 2006 - 21 comments

Hypocrites?

USA Today and others are reporting that Doubleday will be publishing "[t]he original thoughts of Osama bin Laden and other al Qaeda leaders" in a book to be sold in the U.S. (and presumably abroad). From the CNN article, Doubleday plans on donating proceeds from the sale to charity, and openly describes plans to flaunt U.S. law by NOT paying royalties for the use of source materials.

What are the ramifications for a publishing company (which relies on royalty payments and preservation of copyright for self-survival) to ignore their own rules (and U.S. law) when it suits them? Should we expect anyone in the U.S. to care about the royalty payments to these two individuals? Furthermore, could Doubleday's stance affect any of the other copyright infringement actions currently being taken by U.S. organizations?
posted by aberrant on Jan 22, 2005 - 32 comments

Hey! You forgot your cheque!

Royalties Reunited allows artists to collect the royalties from British radio stations, pub jukeboxes, restaurants, gyms and linedancing clubs that "their people" have forgotten to claim. DJ Shadow is there - that's a little money. Nobukazu Takemura is there - that's less money. But the one that surprises me appears after a search for "stupid" - a rather famous actress has failed to collect for her Christmas #1 megahit. I believe we're talking about a lot of money. Are you going to tell her or should I?
posted by Pretty_Generic on Feb 3, 2003 - 4 comments

The story of Soloman Linda and Wimoweh

The story of 'Wimoweh' 'Mbube' or more popularly 'The Lion Sleeps Tonight'. In which a Zulu migrante creates one of the most recorded songs of the twentieth century, but because he was in the wrong place at the wrong time, failed to get any royalties and died a pauper. A contribution to the music copyright debate.
posted by feelinglistless on Jan 10, 2003 - 14 comments

Artemis Records waives Internet royalty fees.

Artemis Records waives Internet royalty fees. "Artemis Records [the label for Steve Earle, among others] has agreed to issue licenses to internet radio for one year for the master use of songs by all Artemis recording artists. This announcement was made today by Danny Goldberg, Chairman and CEO, Artemis Records and Daniel Glass, President, Artemis Records. During this period, beginning August 1, 2002, Artemis will waive the royalty payments that would otherwise be due them. "
posted by mikewas on Jul 29, 2002 - 17 comments

CARP claims a victim.

CARP claims a victim. KPIG, the first radio station to broadcast on the net says "oink!" and falls silent. One shoe fell on June 20, when the new digital performance royalty rate was established. The other shoe is soon to fall. Internet radio stations now have a whopping bill for retroactive royalties that comes due later this fall. More links: Save Internet Ratio! ... Radio and Internet Newsletter ... more news via Google.
posted by chipr on Jul 22, 2002 - 40 comments

Royalties proposed for booming used market as new-CD sales stagnate.

Royalties proposed for booming used market as new-CD sales stagnate. (Via Slashdot). First sale doctrine, anyone? Section 109 of the Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. 109, permits the owner of a particular copy or phonorecord lawfully made under title 17 to sell or otherwise dispose of possession of that copy or phonorecord without the authority of the copyright owner, notwithstanding the copyright owner's exclusive right of distribution under 17 U.S.C. 106(3). Commonly referred to as the ``first sale doctrine,'' this provision permits such activities as the sale of used books. The first sale doctrine is subject to limitations that permit a copyright owner to prevent the unauthorized commercial rental of computer programs and sound recordings.
posted by Bezuhin on Jun 14, 2002 - 23 comments

Mayday!

Mayday! Small independent webcasters -- the ones who couldn't come up with the cash to participate in the CARP -- join forces to protest the CARP-imposed sound recording royalties and accompanying intrusive recordkeeping requirements. They urge that you write to your Congresscritter. Will all this grassroots effort really sway the Library of Congress?
posted by IPLawyer on May 1, 2002 - 13 comments

May 1st Day of Silence on Internet Radio

May 1st Day of Silence Hundreds of Internet radio stations and channels across America are shutting off their music streams on Wednesday, May 1st, in a "Day of Silence" to highlight their concern over the upcoming U.S. Copyright Office ruling on royalty rates that may shut down or bankrupt the vast majority of the nascent Internet radio industry. Write your senators and congressmen and women--Here's how--the Copyright office (info here) and the press. Please note: Letters to the editor (which must be entirely original and not contain any pasted material) can also be sent to your local daily & weekly papers. In both cases we recommend that you send a copy of your message to all of your congressional representatives. See congress.org for email addresses. A copy via fax is also recommended, since faxes often carry more weight than email. Snail mail to Congress these days is very slow, due to the anthrax screening. Please write, this is important. And thank you, Su, for reminding me.
posted by y2karl on Apr 29, 2002 - 2 comments

Going, going, gone.

Despite royalty costs that are lower than for commercial stations, numerous college and community radio stations have either shut down their Internet streams or on the verge of doing so. It's not just royalties killing these webcasts -- there are also regulations that require college stations to report every song they play and restrictions that would force college stations to police how often they play any given artist. Stations are trying to unite and fight these restrictions, but is it too little, too late? Nearly twenty webcasts have already gone under...
posted by insomnia_lj on Apr 8, 2002 - 10 comments

How many CDs do you have to sell to afford that BMW?Find out how much money musicians don't make with the Royalty Caculator.
posted by BarneyFifesBullet on Mar 5, 2002 - 4 comments

It's official, streaming music is now 14 cents per song

It's official, streaming music is now 14 cents per song and retroactive to 1998. An update to an earlier thread, this new ruling would add $150,000 in monthly royalty fees to live365, and probably kill whatever streaming radio sites are currently out there. Of course broadcasting via AM/FM is half price, so maybe pirate radio stations will grow more popular.
posted by mathowie on Feb 22, 2002 - 59 comments

U.S. representative questions the legality of copy-protecting CDs.

U.S. representative questions the legality of copy-protecting CDs. A decade ago, record companies pushed through a law (the Audio Home Recording Act - summary or full text) that gave them a royalty on the sale of certain blank recording media; in return, they acknowledged the right for listeners to make some digital copies for personal use. Rep. Rick Boucher (D-VA) is asking if new schemes blocking even legitimate copies are in violation of this law.
posted by pmurray63 on Jan 5, 2002 - 6 comments

ASCAP & BMI -- Protectors of Artists or Shadowy Thieves?

ASCAP & BMI -- Protectors of Artists or Shadowy Thieves? Read interested in the internal machinations of the music industry may be interested to read this essay describing how ASCAP works, who it targets, and who it benefit.
posted by faisal on May 2, 2001 - 2 comments

Contentville

Contentville is selling copies of over 1.5 million college dissertations and theses published since 1871. Contentville claims that authors will be paid royalties if their works are sold, but somehow I don't think they contacted most of those authors for permission to put said works up for sale in the first place.
posted by phichens on Aug 14, 2000 - 15 comments

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