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“He was making a comment both about culture at Wash U. and the representation of Wash U. by the PR department.”

"Wash U Photo Captions" back online after copyright challenge. Washington University in St Louis redesigned their website, and senior Alex Christensen found the photos kinda cheesy. So he started the Wash U Photo Captions Tumblr to poke fun. ("On Thursday mornings, the nerds are allowed to leave the lab.") But Tumblr shut it down, citing copyright violations, until Christensen got legal help. Now it's back, with gems like this and this. [more inside]
posted by epersonae on Sep 14, 2011 - 35 comments

A pose is a pose is a pose

Poses, an art performance in which regular women replicate the poses struck by glamour models in fashion magazines, by Spanish artist Yolanda Dominguez (interview).
posted by elgilito on Sep 3, 2011 - 57 comments

Orange safety vests may be worn by men and young girls, they bring too much attention to ladies.

Orthodox Jewish newssite Voz Iz Neias provides some Rulings Regarding Shabbos Observance And The Impending Hurricane. FrumSatire provides a counterpoint.
posted by griphus on Aug 27, 2011 - 96 comments

Hello, my name is Tara and I scream my own name during sex

From 1999 to 2003, the largely-female UK comedy trope Smack The Pony had a series of short skits based on video dating ads. Youtube user myLastTears has edited them together into a supercut: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 [more inside]
posted by The Whelk on Aug 21, 2011 - 18 comments

Informative, entertaining and shocking: the Land Octopus, a satirical cartographic animal

Over the centuries, the high seas have served as a blank canvas for cartographers’ worst nightmares. They have dotted the oceans with a whole crypto-zoo of island-sized whales, deathly seductive mermaids, giant sea serpents, and many more - a whole panoply of heraldic horrors. As varied as this marine bestiary is, mapmakers have settled on a single, favourite species for land-based beastliness: the octopus. Bonus: Satire Maps and Fred W. Rose (YT, 3:32); Fred Rose's Serio-Comic War Map (YT, 1:52). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 15, 2011 - 10 comments

Remembering Hermione

Sady Doyle, writing for Global Comment, has released a glowing retrospective of Joanne Rowling's beloved Hermione Granger series of books and movies.
posted by gilrain on Jul 20, 2011 - 252 comments

Robert Altman's "H.E.A.L.T.H."

HealtH (1980) [part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] was the film which ended Robert Altman’s relationship with Twentieth Century Fox, the studio for whom he had made M*A*S*H. ... During the editing of the film Altman’s main supporter, Alan Ladd Jr., left the studio and release was shelved. Altman distributed the film himself to the festival circuit. ... But it has never been released on VHS, DVD or BluRay and thus remains one of the least seen of Altman’s ouvre. This is unfortunate as it is a very entertaining film, even if it falls short of its ambitions as a political satire. Ronald Reagan disagreed - calling it "the world's worst movie".
posted by Trurl on Jul 8, 2011 - 18 comments

Unlimited union and corporate campaign contributions... who?

The Federal Election Commission has given satirist Stephen Colbert the green light to form the "Colbert SuperPAC." Colbert, via his PAC, can now therefore accept unlimited contributions for whatever candidates and causes he wishes.
posted by aught on Jun 30, 2011 - 99 comments

"Too much violence, not enough humanity."

Giles Turnbull responds to the "20 craziest job interview questions" (as asked by such companies as Pottery Barn and Google).
posted by Iridic on Jun 30, 2011 - 213 comments

Your Glory Days are Over, Mr. Cthulhu

Your Glory Days Are Over, Mr. Cthulhu. "Mr Cthulhu tries to interest himself in his sons dance, but mr Cthulhus has lived a sheltered life, the intricacies of modern ballet passes him right by." (by Mattias Adolfsson, previously)
posted by OmieWise on Jun 23, 2011 - 22 comments

The Cartoon Guide to Life, the Universe, and Everything

Larry Gonick is a veteran American cartoonist best known for his delightful comic-book guides to science and history, many of which have previews online. Chief among them is his long-running Cartoon History of the Universe (later The Cartoon History of the Modern World), a sprawling multi-volume opus documenting everything from the Big Bang to the Bush administration. Published over the course of three decades, it takes a truly global view -- its time-traveling Professor thoroughly explores not only familiar topics like Rome and World War II but the oft-neglected stories of Asia and Africa, blending caricature and myth with careful scholarship (cited by fun illustrated bibliographies) and tackling even the most obscure events with intelligence and wit. This savvy satire carried over to Gonick's Zinn-by-way-of-Pogo chronicle The Cartoon History of the United States, along with a bevy of Cartoon Guides to other topics, including Genetics, Computer Science, Chemistry, Physics, Statistics, The Environment, and (yes!) Sex. Gonick has also maintained a few sideprojects, such as a webcomic look at Chinese invention, assorted math comics (previously), the Muse magazine mainstay Kokopelli & Co. (featuring the shenanigans of his "New Muses"), and more. See also these lengthy interview snippets, linked previously. Want more? Amazon links to the complete oeuvre inside! [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jun 6, 2011 - 29 comments

It airs right after "Teen Mom"

30 and Pregnant "How did this happen?" he said. I couldn't believe he didn't know. "We were so careful." I sighed heavily, twirling a piece of spaghetti around my fork, feeling overwhelmed that now I would officially have to come down on one side of the cloth versus disposable diapers debate.
posted by ThePinkSuperhero on Jun 3, 2011 - 212 comments

She is right here with me nowwwww

Electric Daisy Carnival Prompts Amber Alert For Missing Girl named Molly [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on May 30, 2011 - 88 comments

"Now come and get your Ritalin."

An updated Pledge of Allegiance [more inside]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on May 29, 2011 - 72 comments

Ppl just litarally kill me!

Literally Unbelievable is a blog dedicated to Facebook users who don't understand that The Onion is a satire news site.
posted by zardoz on May 27, 2011 - 82 comments

Anonymous Satire of Koch Industries Prevails

In December 2010, a Koch Industries press release spoof (Scribd; alt: screencap) was posted on a website that mimicked the appearance of the official site for Koch Industries. The press release stated that Koch would no longer support research and advocacy initiatives that denied or questioned the human role in climate change. The press release was quickly identified as a hoax, and both the fake press release and site disappeared quickly, yet the Koch company pursued the identities of those behind the stunt, going as far as to file a lawsuit to expose the anonymous pranksters as part of a larger lawsuit. This past Monday, the lawsuit was thrown out of court in Utah, with the judge citing that parody is not commercial speech, and thus a First Amendment issue. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 11, 2011 - 40 comments

You will not need to circumvent the Times' paywall for this.

The New York Times, World's Newspaper of Record, Closes Its Doors Forever. "In this edition of the New York Times, our usual 14 verticals (known for 141 years as 'sections') have been collapsed to 3. The reason is a marked lack of reporters and hence reportage." Former National Lampoon editor Tony Hendra launches a biting satire of the NYTimes, where the owners may have 'torched' the building for insurance money, Maureen Dowd has been on vacation since 1997, and William Shortz melts down.
posted by quadrilaterals on May 10, 2011 - 79 comments

Jane Corwin: Standing Next to Fire Trucks

Why it is important to register your domain name. New York State Assemblywoman Jane Corwin apparently neglected to register her name as a dot org. So somebody else did.
posted by Astro Zombie on May 5, 2011 - 59 comments

Fine British political snark

10 O'Clock Live is a show currently airing on Channel 4 in the UK. It could be considered a British take on the Daily Show, but longer, weekly, with more discussion, and performed live. MeFi favorite Charlie Brooker is one of their presenters, along with David Mitchel, Lauren Laverne and Jimmy Carr. While focused on British issues, the show sometimes covers international topics, and is wildly funny. Here are some highlights:
Charlie Brooker: On Gaddafi - On Berlusconi - On the 'Big Society' - On Sarah Palin - On the iPad 2 - On the English Defense League & the Daily Star - On Ed Miliband (Leader of the Labour Party, beating out his brother David) - On Prince Andrew
David Mitchell: On political hyperbole - On language in the media - On encouraging rich people to immigrate - On what to do with the Olympic Stadium
Jimmy Carr: As Berlusconi - On Product Placement
Lauren Laverne: Guide for new democracies - Inside the brain of Ed Miliband - British PR companies helping tyrants
Everyone on David Cameron on The One Show (this one's awesome)
[more inside]
posted by JHarris on Mar 24, 2011 - 84 comments

Opera and Ballet, Explained

Satiric Art by Polish artist Pawła Kuczyńskiego (Paul Kuczynski).
posted by bwg on Mar 3, 2011 - 12 comments

Short-fingered vulgarians

Google Books has digitized all issues of SPY, the 80s New York satirical magazine that combined humor with investigative reporting. Half the issues are now available; the other half will be released soon.
posted by catlet on Feb 16, 2011 - 106 comments

Google "Parody". Or Bing it. Or Blekko It.

The Content Farm is a not-very-subtle satire of The New Web Journalism (currently accepting submissions*) which got a surprising bit of (not good?) publicity by being used as an 'example' in Google's announcement of its Content Farm Blocking Chrome Extension. Why did it get singled out? Why not this Content Farm? [more inside]
posted by oneswellfoop on Feb 14, 2011 - 43 comments

The most emailed New York Times article ever

Like many of the ibex farms sprouting up across the northeastern United States, Yael offers an intensive Chinese-language immersion course. The most emailed New York Times article ever.
posted by gottabefunky on Jan 20, 2011 - 59 comments

The Bermuda Triangle of Productivity

The Bermuda Triangle of Productivity
posted by Tuesday After Lunch on Dec 31, 2010 - 39 comments

An overload of Mystery Science Theater musical moments

During the show's history Mystery Science Theater did many musical bits. Topless Robot recently linked to the "13 best" Mystery Science Theater 3000 songs. It's not a bad list, although there are some notable exclusions. About those, click through.... [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Dec 6, 2010 - 62 comments

Fous ta cagoule!

Fatal, the story of a country bumpkin from Savoie who passes himself off as a streetwise rapper. In reality the satirical creation of Michäel Youn, the French equivalent of Andy Samberg or Sacha Baron Cohen, rap group Fatal Bazooka have already had worldwide European success with Fous Ta Cagoule (an exhortation to attire oneself properly on the ski slopes - English lyrics here) and Parle à Ma Main, featuring Yelle. Other work includes Mauvaise Foi Nocturne and the Sean Paul/Benny Benassi/Eric Prydz-inspired J'aime Trop Ton Boule. Youn is also responsible for the familiar-sounding Comme de Connards and the completely nonsensical Stach Stach which was the number one single in France for almost four months.
posted by djgh on Nov 29, 2010 - 14 comments

Winners Never Quit.

One of the greatest movie satires you almost never saw, Norman Lear's first stab at film making sat for two years before its 1971 release. Shot on location in Greenfield, Iowa, it featured a who's who cast of television comedy, [more inside]
posted by timsteil on Nov 12, 2010 - 25 comments

We Join Together to Battle Velvet

"I came to this beautiful hall in a soiled subway car, but I might as well have travelled in a grand carriage. As I walked down the street I drew sidelong glances. 'Who is this man,' they seemed to say. 'A man at home where-ever he travels. A man of refinement. A man of elegance. A man of corduroy.'" An address to the Corduroy Appreciation Club (previously) by MeFi's youngamerican Jesse Thorn.
posted by l33tpolicywonk on Nov 12, 2010 - 59 comments

The Realist Archive Project completed

The Realist Archive Project (previously) is now complete. The Realist, edited and published by Paul Krassner, was a pioneering magazine of "social-political-religious criticism and satire" in the American countercultural press of the mid-20th century. Although The Realist is often regarded as a major milestone in the underground press, it was a nationally-distributed newsstand publication as early as 1959. Publication was discontinued in 2001.
posted by Joe Beese on Nov 9, 2010 - 6 comments

Word to your Mo-Ther!

Polka medleys are a trademark of Weird Al Yankovic in which he covers the era's most iconic songs on accordion. His next album will likely include Polka Face. But, if you like some of the older stuff... [more inside]
posted by l33tpolicywonk on Oct 30, 2010 - 27 comments

They just want their comics back!

When the Tea Party takes over the comics page. - Comics reimagined by Ward Sutton for the Boston Globe [more inside]
posted by BeerFilter on Sep 26, 2010 - 58 comments

Domestic Conflict, Explained by Stock Photos

Domestic Conflict, Explained by Stock Photos
posted by Joe Beese on Sep 8, 2010 - 25 comments

The Non-Expert

Experts answer what they know. The Non-Expert answers anything. For example, Can We Date? — home to this flowchart to help determine what is legal, and what is socially acceptable. [previously]
posted by netbros on Sep 6, 2010 - 13 comments

"Getting up mad and staying mad all day certainly describes Paul Conrad"

The acclaimed Los Angeles Times political cartoonist Paul Conrad is dead. [more inside]
posted by blucevalo on Sep 4, 2010 - 14 comments

It Couldn't Happen Here

GBH was a seven-part British television drama written by Alan Bleasdale [previously1] [previously2] shown in the summer of 1991 on Channel 4. The protagonists were Michael Murray (played by Robert Lindsay), the Militant Labour leader of a city council in the North of England and Jim Nelson (played by Michael Palin), the headmaster of a school for disturbed children. The series was controversial partly because Murray appeared to be based on Derek Hatton, former Deputy Leader of Liverpool City Council - in an interview in the G.B.H. DVD Bleasdale recounts an accidental meeting with Hatton before the series, who indicates that he has caught wind of Bleasdale's intentions but does not mind as long as the actor playing him is "handsome". [more inside]
posted by KokuRyu on Aug 29, 2010 - 22 comments

If you want Yours, take a short piece of Lead Pipe and go out and Collect.

Although Fables in Slang were written in 1899, they describe people who are clearly recognizable today. Partly because of his style, though, George Ade (1866-1944) is forgotten as H.L. Mencken predicted he would be. From 1890 to around the close of WWI, Ade was widely known within the US as a humorist and playwright. [more inside]
posted by jet_silver on Aug 21, 2010 - 6 comments

The Devil's Dictionary X!

"Repairing the English Language since 1998." Based on Ambrose Bierce's Original Devil's Dictionary [more inside]
posted by fantodstic on Aug 13, 2010 - 18 comments

A great and unprecedented rage

Russian Satirical Journals of 1905. MeFi's own peacay presents a selection of the amazing images produced after the lifting of censorship in Russia following the 1905 Revolution: "For a few brief months the journals spoke with a great and unprecedented rage that neither arrest nor exile could silence. At first their approach was oblique, their allusions veiled, and they often fell victim to the censor’s pencil. But people had suffered censorship for too long." Much more available at Beinecke, USC, and Wisconsin.
posted by languagehat on Aug 6, 2010 - 8 comments

Sunday Satire by Mark Fiore.

Mark Fiore is a political cartoonist. Mark Fiore won a Pulitzer Prize this year. Mark Fiore hasn't been featured on the Blue since 2006 (previously). Mark Fiore has animated some amusing cartoons about recent events: Wikileaks, Conflict Minerals, Gaza Flotilla, BP (2) (3), War on Drugs, Climate Gate, Guantanamo, Haiti, and more!.
posted by tybeet on Aug 1, 2010 - 17 comments

Cow Clicker

Cow Clicker is a Facebook game about Facebook games. It's partly a satire, and partly a playable theory of today's social games, and partly an earnest example of that genre. [more inside]
posted by Joe Beese on Jul 22, 2010 - 22 comments

The Greatest Political Comic Never Published

Terrence Nowicki, Jr. is different than most political comic writers. Many political comics today are more about kneejerk satire as part of a zeitgeist than exposing politicians and the tragicomic predicaments of the United States. Yet, the format is capable of so much more. Terrence Nowicki, Jr.'s This Is Historic Times is not your usual comic. In his comics, profligate use of explanatory words are gauche, and the message has to reverberate. [more inside]
posted by blook on Jul 13, 2010 - 64 comments

Babakiueria

"It's a barbecue area." "They call this: Babakiueria!"
posted by Fiasco da Gama on Jun 30, 2010 - 12 comments

Surely you can't be serious?

“There is one line in ‘Zero Hour!’ where a stewardess says, completely seriously, ‘The life of everyone on board depends upon just one thing: finding someone back there who can not only fly this plane, but who didn’t have fish for dinner,’ ” Mr. Abrahams said. “That was the essence of the movie. We just repeated the line. We didn’t have to change a thing.”

Airplane! (known in Australia as Flying High!) turns 30 [more inside]
posted by crossoverman on Jun 28, 2010 - 186 comments

After the revolution, life goes on... and so do the bugs.

The Exterminator’s Want-Ad, a short story by Bruce Sterling, is a twisted first-person missive by a former K-Street lobbyist making his way in a post-collapse socialist regime of sharing. It's part of the Shareable Futures series of short stories and speculative essays at Shareable.net. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Jun 24, 2010 - 41 comments

Full Week

Full Week: nothing but pure, list pulverizing accomplishment in six easy phases.* With interactive calendar! (Revolving Floor previously.) [more inside]
posted by jjray on Jun 19, 2010 - 12 comments

Concurrent virtual exhibits of historical political cartoons courtesy of Duke University

This past Spring, Duke University hosted concurrent exhibits that featured curated images of satirical political cartoons. Fortunately, the exhibits are free to enjoy from the comfort of your bed/couch/desk chair. From the Nasher Museum of Art, there is Lines of Attack: Conflicts in Caricature, comparing pieces from as early as 19th Century France to post 9/11 US. From the Perkins Library, we get Abusing Power: Satirical Journals, an exhibit of 19th and early 20th Century pieces from around the world.
posted by Ufez Jones on Jun 10, 2010 - 3 comments

It's public radio. Your parents listen to it.

NPR rolls out some innovative social media strategies. SLYT.
posted by l33tpolicywonk on Jun 5, 2010 - 39 comments

The Front Fell Off

The Front Fell Off [more inside]
posted by HumanComplex on May 29, 2010 - 30 comments

Crowdsourcing Crime Prevention!

Want to earn tons of cool badges and prizes while competing with you friends to see who can be the best American? It's up to you to keep America safe! If you see something suspicious, Snap it! If you see someone who doesn't belong, Snap it! Not sure if someone or something is suspicious? Snap it anyway!
posted by boo_radley on May 7, 2010 - 24 comments

cleanternet

cleanternet: for a cleaner and safer internet.
posted by homunculus on Apr 25, 2010 - 58 comments

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