3668 posts tagged with science.
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contains the entire word Solar and rhymes with Polaris

33 COSMIC CAR NAMES / Car names -- past & present -- that reference or evoke the Universe.
A list by Neil deGrasse Tyson
posted by timshel on May 3, 2016 - 15 comments

The Cure For Fear

Scientists have discovered a radical new way to treat our most traumatic memories.
posted by MythMaker on May 2, 2016 - 66 comments

how it's made in japan

Ever wondered what a possible Japanese equivalent for How It's Made could be like? The jstsciencechannel has one! There are from 2 to 150, and 151 to 309 videos to choose from. Sadly, they lack English subtitles, however there are a handful of videos that do have them. Starting with mayonnaise, the series takes you through the making of steel balls (available in English), the construction and testing of sewing machines, how rice crackers are made, a thermos factory, the recycling of PET bottles, a matcha tea factory and the creation of bamboo whisks, and plenty more.
posted by aroweofshale on Apr 30, 2016 - 19 comments

What gravity?

Tareq Alsaadi performs gravity-defying aerobatics with the SAB Goblin Nitro radio-controlled helicopter — in one case, with some interesting LED patterns on the blades
posted by a lungful of dragon on Apr 29, 2016 - 12 comments

Slovenia's Astonishing Baby Dragons

What’s Behind Slovenia’s Love Affair with a Salamander?
posted by ChuraChura on Apr 28, 2016 - 9 comments

Drkatzbot

Reverse OCR is a bot that picks a word and then draws randomly until an OCR library recognizes it
posted by a lungful of dragon on Apr 28, 2016 - 19 comments

Scots are mad for citrus!

Scurvy Dogs - A brief overview of the history of the scurvy, brought to you by naval cartoonist Lucy Bellwood
posted by a lungful of dragon on Apr 27, 2016 - 19 comments

Why Do Taxonomists Write the Meanest Obituaries?

Rafinesque’s “absurd” botanical legacy, Gray wrote, amounted to little more than a “curious mass of nonsense.” Gray’s note wouldn’t be the last unkind obituary in the annals of taxonomy, nor would it be the worst. That’s because the rules dictating how taxonomists name and classify living things bind these scientists in a web of influence stretching far back into the 18th century. When an agent of chaos like Rafinesque enters the scene, that web can get sticky fast. In a field haunted by ghosts, someone has to reckon with the dead.
posted by sciatrix on Apr 27, 2016 - 4 comments

Tweeteorology

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology BirdCast: Bird Migration Forecasts in Real-Time. When, where, and how far will birds migrate? Our migration forecasts will answer these questions for the first time.
posted by not_on_display on Apr 26, 2016 - 2 comments

There are no things, there are only truths.

Something terrible happened to you in outer space. All you can remember are the last few moments, the sun fading to a speck as you and your crew broke free from the solar system, the ship’s systems suddenly shutting down, the panic and blackness inside, shouting and sobbing, outside the phosphorescent fringes of the wormhole as it opened up in front of you—and then you woke up, sweat-slick in your own bed at sunrise, with the birds singing outside, in another universe. You are trapped in the world of the popular TV astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, and you know this, because here the sunrise isn’t a sunrise at all.
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Apr 22, 2016 - 102 comments

The Curious Link Between the Fly-By Anomaly and the “Impossible” EmDrive

The EmDrive (previously 1, 2) is still getting attention from the scientific community. MIT Technology Review sums it up: The Curious Link Between the Fly-By Anomaly and the “Impossible” EmDrive Thruster
posted by Harald74 on Apr 21, 2016 - 40 comments

One Part Science, One Part Human Interest

Message in a bottle, promising finder a shilling, bobs up after 108 years “We found an old shilling, I think we got it on eBay. We sent it to her with a letter saying thank you.” [more inside]
posted by Michele in California on Apr 20, 2016 - 11 comments

It's the tops

Spintop Snipers
posted by a lungful of dragon on Apr 13, 2016 - 15 comments

He also heard the Hum

From Zug Island to Bristol to British Columbia, interest in a mysterious humming sound continues. Colin Dickey investigates The World Hum Map and Database Project, its creator, and some recent experiments, including the first Deming box. Stops along the way include TACAMO, tin foil hats, school shootings, Jesse Ventura's tv show, and noise-abatement laws. [more inside]
posted by doctornemo on Apr 13, 2016 - 34 comments

D'oh!

The Dodo is extinct. But apparently not for the reasons we long believed. And those pictures of the bird we're used to seeing? Not so accurate. It's a tale of a tradition of Bad Science and the struggle to fix mistakes made long ago.
posted by oneswellfoop on Apr 11, 2016 - 28 comments

The Flying Forest

"While crows and ravens get most of the attention, smaller members of the corvid family like jays and nutcrackers are out in the world busily building and rebuilding forests. Not on purpose, of course, but through a behavior charmingly called “scatter hoarding,” which basically involves stashing seeds around in various places for later devourment." And this allows the trees - oaks, chestnuts, beeches, hickories - to "borrow the wings of birds." [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Apr 10, 2016 - 19 comments

If America Wants to Kill Science, It’s on Its Way

Science is desperate. It needs to believe itself honorable. It's threatened by the fact that it's not safe for so many of us. Period. It's just not safe.
- A. Hope Jahren, in an interview about women in science and advancement in plant biology.
posted by divabat on Apr 8, 2016 - 16 comments

The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary

The mysterious and useful Vegetable Lamb of Tartary: a plant whose ripe seed-pods yield tiny live lambs. Or was it a plant growing in the shape of a full-size lamb, but with an umbilical tether to the ground? (Oh, and do you know about the barnacle goose?) A tale from the medieval science grapevine. [more inside]
posted by LobsterMitten on Apr 8, 2016 - 7 comments

Changing minds on minority rights with a single conversation, revisited

Previously on MeFi, a pair of then-graduate students, David Broockman and Joshua Kalla, uncovered that some highly-publicized research, claiming to show that brief conversations with gay canvassers could cause lasting changes in people's opinions on gay rights, was in fact fraudulent, and was based on fabricated data. However, whether or not there was in fact any grain of truth to that paper's claims remained to be seen. Recently, the same team that uncovered the fraud has published their own study, showing that canvassing can really be effective at durably increasing support for transgender rights. [more inside]
posted by en forme de poire on Apr 8, 2016 - 26 comments

Physics, math and science toys

Physics Fun is an Instagram account with short videos of physics, math and science 'toys.' An accompanying blog looks at some in more detail.
posted by carter on Apr 8, 2016 - 7 comments

“Nature is perhaps the most complex word in the language.”

Generation Anthropocene: How Humans Have Altered the Planet for Ever. by Robert Macfarlane [The Guardian] We are living in the Anthropocene age, in which human influence on the planet is so profound – and terrifying – it will leave its legacy for millennia. Politicians and scientists have had their say, but how are writers and artists responding to this crisis?
posted by Fizz on Apr 2, 2016 - 35 comments

The centre at the edge

Is There Value in Training Scientific Generalists For Positions at the Edge of Academia? Gopal Sarma says Yes
posted by Rumple on Apr 2, 2016 - 28 comments

A new banana promises to cure blindness in East Africa

"In the winter of 2014, students at Iowa State University received emails asking them to volunteer for an experiment. Researchers were looking for women who would eat bananas that had been genetically engineered to produce extra carotenes, the yellow-orange nutrients that take their name from carrots. Our bodies use alpha and beta carotenes to make retinol, better known as vitamin A, and the experiment was testing how much of the carotenes in the bananas would transform to vitamin A. The researchers were part of an international team trying to end vitamin A deficiency. The emails reached the volunteers they needed to begin the experiment, but they also reached protesters. “As a student in the sustainability program, I immediately started asking questions,” said Iowa State postdoc Rivka Fidel. “Is this proven safe? Have they considered the broader cultural and economic issues?” ... Fidel told me she and her friends had found it nearly impossible to extract information from researchers, or from the Gates Foundation, which is providing funding for this project. Too often conversations about these kinds of issues simply reverberate within their respective echo chambers. So to bridge the gap I took the gist of the students’ questions to people at the Gates Foundation, scientists working on the banana, and the one person who may have done the most to fight vitamin A deficiency — an ophthalmologist who has no interest in either promoting or bashing GMOs." [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Mar 31, 2016 - 65 comments

Of Smoothies and (Internet News) Cycles

LIGHTS UP
Buzzfeed: “Gwyneth Paltrow drinks $200 smoothies for breakfast!”
Vanity Fair: “Actually, they’re just $10.52 smoothies.”
Washington Post: “Whatever! It’s a good excuse for us to make a video and talk about the theoretical health benefits.”
fin.
posted by Going To Maine on Mar 24, 2016 - 49 comments

The Harvard Library That Protects The World's Rarest Colors

The most unusual colors from Harvard's storied pigment library include beetle extracts, poisonous metals, and human mummies
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Mar 24, 2016 - 18 comments

Not much writing, oddly

Evan "The Nerdwriter" Puschak examines How Hitchcock Blocks a Scene. [more inside]
posted by ChurchHatesTucker on Mar 23, 2016 - 13 comments

"This is big science performed on the tiniest of scales"

Take a 360-Degree Tour Inside the Large Hadron Collider
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Mar 21, 2016 - 8 comments

haha cool, ok, we’re friends now, big guy. no problems

so anyway that is the best thing: bobcats are not equipped to make friends, but luckily for this bobcat this homeless lady did not give any shits and made friends anyway. and now they are both happy.
posted by moody cow on Mar 19, 2016 - 31 comments

Unproblematica

The classification of Illinois's state fossil, the Tully monster, has been a mystery since its discovery in 1958. But now a team at Yale has determined that it is a vertebrate ancestor of the lamprey, after studying over a thousand fossils and noticing the presence of a notochord, among other distinctively vertebratey features. The (paywalled) Nature paper is here.
posted by theodolite on Mar 16, 2016 - 11 comments

Masturbating for Science

Are You Orgasming Without Even Knowing It? I was determined to lose my sex-in-a-brain-scanner virginity.
posted by Michele in California on Mar 14, 2016 - 36 comments

Womanhood is a culture held together through our physical pain

After Neil deGrasse Tyson made a tweet claiming that any species with painful sex would have gone extinct, other scientists chimed in with examples of animals with particularly torturous sex. Most poignant, though, was this response by Abby Norman about dyspareunia, a medical condition involving painful vaginal penetration, as well as the pressures on women to satisfy their male partner over their own needs and health. (Warning: Abby Norman's piece has some possibly-graphic medical photography.)
posted by divabat on Mar 13, 2016 - 135 comments

Digital Humanism

The Digital in the Humanities: An Interview with Franco Moretti - "the term 'digital humanities' (DH) has captured the imagination and the ire of scholars across American universities. The field, which melds computer science with hermeneutics, is championed by supporters as the much-needed means to shake up and expand methods of traditional literary interpretation and is seen by its most outspoken critics as a new fad that symbolizes the neoliberal bean counting destroying American higher education. Somewhere in the middle of these two extremes lies a vast and varied body of work that utilizes and critically examines digital tools in the pursuit of humanistic study. [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Mar 9, 2016 - 21 comments

The Secret Service will rest easier without you around on our south lawn

15 seasons.
282 Episodes.
13 years.
Thousands of experiments and explosions.
White House visits, including a failed solar death ray.
And at least one Metafilter debate answered on air.
Goodbye, Mythbusters. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 9, 2016 - 68 comments

Print is back in fashion

Transplantable human bone and cartilage made with 3D printer that creates a matrix in the desired shape and injects cells that can integrate with the patient's blood vessels on implant
posted by a lungful of dragon on Mar 8, 2016 - 11 comments

She wanted to do her research; he wanted to talk feelings.

Sexual harassment in science generally starts like this: A woman (she is a student, a technician, a professor) gets an email and notices that the subject line is a bit off: “I need to tell you,” or “my feelings.” The opening lines refer to the altered physical and mental state of the author: “It’s late and I can’t sleep” is a favorite, though “Maybe it’s the three glasses of cognac” is popular as well.
posted by sciatrix on Mar 7, 2016 - 171 comments

Replication study fails under scrutiny

A much publicized study (previously) suggested that more than half of all psychology studies cannot be replicated. A new study finds that the replication study was full of serious mistakes and its conclusion is wrong. [more inside]
posted by hawthorne on Mar 6, 2016 - 49 comments

Shoaling, refraction, convergence, interference

What makes an epic wave. Learn how 20 meter (and taller!) waves form thanks to “The Nazaré Wave” short video, featuring high school students from Escola Secundária de Gama Barros (Sintra, Portugal) [more inside]
posted by spamandkimchi on Mar 5, 2016 - 2 comments

"...one of the scariest things they saw as children."

Children of the Stones (previously) is the revolutionary 1977 British children's television drama telling the story of an astrophysicist and his son who arrive in the village of Milbury to study the giant Neolithic stones which surround it, and the community which is held in a strange captivity by the psychic forces generated by the stones. For BBC Radio, writer and comedian Stewart Lee explores the ground breaking television series and examines its special place in the memories of those children who watched it on its initial transmission in a state of excitement and terror. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 4, 2016 - 70 comments

“To begin with I was hoping it was just a phase.”

What should we do about paedophiles? by Sophie Elmhirst [The Guardian] They have committed unspeakable crimes that demand harsh punishment. But most will eventually be set free. Are we prepared to support efforts to rehabilitate them? [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Mar 2, 2016 - 37 comments

At Sea with America's Largest Floating Gathering of Conspiracy Theorists

It’s an experience that may not appeal to everyone—a seven-day cruise at sea, with the aim of “taking back power from corrupt and greedy institutions, attain true self-authority, and realize our genuine Self behind the masks … discovering the truth, taking command of our lives, and attaining genuine inner realization” —with every odd belief you can think of listed as entertainment: GMOs, Monsanto, bee colony collapse, ecology, global warming, climate change, fracking, HIV, autism, Big Pharma, medical suppression, vaccinations, fluoridation,… electoral fraud, identity chips, 2nd amendment, and so much more. Anna Merlan writes charitably yet unflinchingly for Jezebel about her experience joining them [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Feb 29, 2016 - 121 comments

“They just added an extra five days of festivals, of partying...”

The Surprising History Behind Leap Year by Brian Handwerk [National Geographic]
The ancient Egyptians did it, and so do we. Here's how a leap day—which occurs Februrary 29—helps keep our calendars and societies in sync. It's that time again: This Monday, February 29, is a leap day, the calendar oddity that occurs (almost) every four years. For centuries, trying to sync calendars with the length of the natural year caused confusion—until the concept of leap year provided a way to make up for lost time.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Feb 29, 2016 - 39 comments

“It is understandable to a capable schoolchild.”

The People Who Believe Electricity Rules the Universe
. . . “Science is returned to the people—the garage tinkerer, the practical engineer, and the natural philosopher,” Thornhill told Motherboard.
posted by Countess Elena on Feb 28, 2016 - 41 comments

GNC, Target, Wal-Mart, Walgreens accused of selling adulterated herbals

The New York State attorney general’s office accused four major retailers on Monday of selling fraudulent and potentially dangerous herbal supplements and demanded that they remove the products from their shelves. The authorities said they had conducted tests on top-selling store brands of herbal supplements at four national retailers — GNC, Target, Walgreens and Walmart — and found that four out of five of the products did not contain any of the herbs on their labels. The tests showed that pills labeled medicinal herbs often contained little more than cheap fillers like powdered rice, asparagus and houseplants, and in some cases substances that could be dangerous to those with allergies. [NYTimes], [WaPo] [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Feb 26, 2016 - 101 comments

“So then they understand: ‘If I smell TB, I get food’.”

The rats who sniff out tuberculosis. by Emma Young [The Guardian] The African giant pouched rat can be trained to sniff out tuberculosis more accurately than most lab tests. So why is the medical profession still sceptical? [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 25, 2016 - 24 comments

What sparked the Cambrian explosion?

An evolutionary burst 540 million years ago filled the seas with an astonishing diversity of animals. The trigger behind that revolution is finally coming into focus , according to the journal Nature. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 19, 2016 - 38 comments

View from the left eye

The self-portrait of Ernst Mach. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Feb 18, 2016 - 10 comments

Who honeys the guides?

"When Hadza want to find honey, they shout and whistle a special tune. If a honeyguide is around, it’ll fly into the camp, chattering and fanning out its feathers. The Hadza, now on the hunt, chase it, grabbing their axes and torches and shouting “Wait!” They follow the honeyguide until it lands near its payload spot, pinpoint the correct tree, smoke out the bees, hack it open, and free the sweet combs from the nest. The honeyguide stays and watches. It’s one of those stories that sounds like a fable—until you get to the end, where the lesson normally goes. Then it becomes a bit more confusing."
posted by ChuraChura on Feb 17, 2016 - 14 comments

Highway to the Vapor Cone

Ensign John Gay of the U.S. Navy had just returned home from several months aboard the U.S.S. Constellation in the South Pacific when his phone rang. A reporter for a photography magazine was on the line, hoping to discuss the 2000 World Press Photo Awards. Gay was perplexed: “Who are you and what do you want?” he said. The reporter explained that Gay’s photo had taken first prize in the Science and Technology category, which was news to Gay: he didn’t even know he’d entered the prestigious contest.
posted by jferngler on Feb 16, 2016 - 27 comments

Six Extinctions in Six Minutes

Six scientists at the American Museum of Natural History explain what we know, and what’s still mysterious, about the disappearance of six different species/genera. [more inside]
posted by coolname on Feb 15, 2016 - 13 comments

“Let's get started before my headache gets any worse.”

Trek at 50: The quest for a unifying theory of time travel in Star Trek by Xaq Rzetelny [Ars Technica] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 13, 2016 - 33 comments

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