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2 posts tagged with sciencefiction by interrobang.
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In 1958, Robert Heinlein took out a full-page ad in the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph titled "Who Are the Heirs of Patrick Henry?" (quotes from which are readable here), a hawkish appeal for increased nuclear testing. Alexei Panshin, a former fan, read it and responded with his wonderful novel "Rite of Passage". Panshin wrote a book of Heinlein criticism, and talks about his issues with Heinlein in this essay, which is a fascinating look at one great science-fiction author responding to another.
posted by interrobang on Sep 5, 2002 - 15 comments

Ace Doubles were undersized paperback novels published from the mid 1950s to the late 1960s. One book was on one side, the other, upside-down on the back. Sometimes, they were intended to introduce a new author t o the public by piggybacking the newcomer with a well-known professional (with varying results). Aside from the novelty of the layout of an Ace Double there is the fabulous art by now-unknown artists like Ed Emshwiller (Emsh), Jack Gaughan (my favorite) and Ed Valigursky. I myself am partial to the D series. รข??
posted by interrobang on Jul 17, 2002 - 17 comments

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