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Steam Wars

Steam Wars is the many decades long dream project of writer/illustrator Larry Blamire. Essentially the story of three soldiers set in a Victorian era war that features giant Jules Verneseque steam-powered mechrobots, the story has kicked around in Blamire's imagination since the 1970s. In an attempt to get the story made into a movie, he's put up a site with concept sketches, full color art & even faux memorabilia from the ficticious wars.
posted by jonson on Jan 3, 2007 - 25 comments

 

A day to be thankful for resublimated thiotimoline.

Think you get a lot done? Isaac Asimov (pronounced like "has, him, of" without the h's) , who would have turned 87 today, wrote or edited over 500 books, including science-fiction novels, introductions to organic chemistry (a field in which he held a professorship at B.U.) , indispensable anthologies of early science fiction, jokebooks, guides to Shakespeare, and collections of lively essays on science that have introduced thousands of people to the pleasures of thinking hard about the universe. He also found the time to write a few essays and write postcards to his fans. His story "Runaround" , from his 1950 collection I, Robot, is the only piece of fiction I know centered on the properties of a differential equation. His Foundation Trilogy was given a special Hugo award in 1966 as the best science fiction series of all time; a movie version, to be written by Jeff Vintar and directed by Shekhar Kapur, is currently in development. Previous AsimovFilter: here, here, here. Feel like a slacker yet? Stop reading MetaFilter and get to work!
posted by escabeche on Jan 2, 2007 - 95 comments

"The Free Woman is a riddle, the answer to which is the collar."

Goreans are inspired by the sci-fi works of Gor, by John Norman, whose turgid prose lays out a way of life for male masters and female slaves...but also Free Women. So why not meet one? Or at least say hello. And don't forget their humor! It sure is something. It just isn't BDSM.
posted by Sticherbeast on Dec 20, 2006 - 63 comments

La Planète sauvage

La Planète sauvage - based on the novel Oms en Série by Stefan Wul, and known to the English speaking world as Fantastic Planet, is a wonderfully psychadelic animated Sci-Fi film from 1973. An international production between France and Czechoslovakia, the movie has a cult following, mostly from viewers who saw it on USA's Night Flight in the 1980's. Although it has languished in obscurity for some time, Hollywood has decided it's time for a live action remake. For those who haven't seen it, or for people who haven't seen it in twenty years, some kind soul has uploaded the entire film to Youtube. You'll never look at your pets the same way again.
posted by smoothvirus on Dec 11, 2006 - 36 comments

Firefly Flanvention Flattened; Fans Find Finkery at Fault

The Hero of Burbank, The Man They Call Jayne. Just a day before it starts, the Firefly-focused "Flanvention" convention was canceled by Booster Entertainment (who took down their entire site in the process), leaving about 500 "flans" who had paid $225 for a weekend pass (some math) (and some who paid $5000 for lifetime passes to all Booster cons — although that may not have been as foolish as it might appear) and who had made nonrefundable flights and nonrefundable hotel reservations with nothing for the money they had spent on con(vention) passes or their accommodations. Now, that, in and of itself, is quite unpleasant but perhaps not MeFi-worthy — but what pushes this over the edge to being a cool story is when the Firefly actors decided to come out anyway — evidently unpaid — for their "flans." [more inside]
posted by WCityMike on Dec 8, 2006 - 62 comments

Scifi magazine covers, 1930-today

A year-by-year archive, from 1930 to the present, of every poignant, creepy, tacky, tragic, goofy, beautiful and, yes, kinda slutty cover of the magazine that started out as Astounding Stories of Super Science and became Analog, with lots of changes in between. [via the horse's neck]
posted by mediareport on Nov 11, 2006 - 35 comments

On the Edge of Blade Runner

On the Edge of Blade Runner [documentary, google video, 52mins]
posted by MetaMonkey on Oct 29, 2006 - 114 comments

They have a plan...

Which side are we on? We're on the side of the demons, Chief. We're evil men in the gardens of paradise, sent by the forces of death to spread devastation and destruction wherever we go. I'm surprised you didn't know that.
posted by furiousxgeorge on Oct 15, 2006 - 88 comments

SWFROADS

SWFRoads is one of the coolest flash games I've seen in a while.
posted by delmoi on Sep 17, 2006 - 20 comments

3D Starmaps.

Planning a jump to Barnard's Star? Making the Kessel Run in 11 parsecs? You'll need maps. Also available in a solid state format from Bathsheba Sculpture. (Previously)
posted by loquacious on Sep 16, 2006 - 11 comments

Westerns, Noirs, and Sci-Fi, Oh My!

A Dozen Eccentric Westerns, Ten Neglected Science Fiction Movies, and Ten Overlooked Noirs selected by Jonathan Rosenbaum. A follow-up to an earlier post on offbeat musicals.
posted by jonp72 on Sep 8, 2006 - 56 comments

Meet me in Washington Square... and bring the Lightsabers.

Young Folks in the city playing kids' games with expensive toys. Or you can get budget version, for those who just prefer to whack each other. Who exactly does this sort of thing? It's getting more popular.
posted by ®@ on Aug 28, 2006 - 13 comments

Elves of the Subdimensions

Flurb - issue #1, from Rudy Rucker.
posted by tellurian on Aug 23, 2006 - 10 comments

Romance 2.0: Upgrade Today!

Romance 2.0 : Jan-M. Studt's writing/directing debut. "Businesswoman Sarah Townsend looked back on a successful day when a promising, unknown man called on her 3D-holophone. Too bad the holophone technique isn't very advanced yet. And men are not what they used to be..." (German with English subtitles.)
posted by Orb on Aug 15, 2006 - 14 comments

They're Made out of Meat

They're Made out of Meat. A short story by Terry Bisson (discussed earlier) has been adapted to the very small screen as a short film.
posted by CrunchyFrog on Jun 24, 2006 - 32 comments

To Boldly Redo What Some Man Had Done Before

In 2003, Paramount proposed redoing the special effects for the original "Star Trek" series and rereleasing the episodes as "Star Trek Enhanced". Two CGI firms redid the effects for the teaser, the opening credits and title, and the first two acts of The Doomsday Machine as a proof-of-concept with no changes to the acting or the story. Paramount ultimately decided not to pursue the project, but it's interesting to see how two different CGI firms handled the transporter, phasers, and starship effects.
posted by fandango_matt on Jun 23, 2006 - 74 comments

Tim Hildebrant 1936-2006

Tim Hildebrandt, half of the Brothers Hildebrandt artwork team, died yesterday due to complications from diabetes.
posted by WolfDaddy on Jun 12, 2006 - 28 comments

Martians, robots & flying cities

FRANK R. PAUL: At a time when most Americans didn't even have a telephone, he was painting space stations, robots and aliens from other planets... he was the guest of honor at the first world science fiction convention, and he was the first person to ever make a living drawing spaceships. What could be cooler than that? via the one and only BLDBLOG, with an interesting take on the subject.
posted by signal on May 17, 2006 - 19 comments

...maybe new ideas will come.

A talk given by Matt Webb on fictional futures, and a whole lot besides. Just some text and some pictures, but he takes you on a most excellent brain adventure, from Italo Calvino to a map of all the biochemical reactions on Earth to Vannevar Bush’s machine, the Memex with dozens of stops in between. One of my favorite parts -- and the coolest use of RSS I've ever seen -- is a tool to subscribe to your personal lightcone. [via]
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken on May 7, 2006 - 18 comments

Han shoots first.

Hoth Hell Freezes Over. The madness of King George subsides.
posted by Robot Johnny on May 4, 2006 - 82 comments

Prepare for the home-made invasion!

Robots, rockets, and rayguns, oh my!
posted by Robot Johnny on Apr 7, 2006 - 11 comments

Stanislaw Lem: 1921-2006

Stanislaw Lem: 1921-2006. Polish science-fiction giant Stanislaw Lem died this morning. He was 84. Though Lem was not as well known as Asimov or Heinlein or the other "Masters", he was just as important to the genre. Lem was not a fan of traditonal science-fiction, and in his work tried to approach futuristic themes from a more humanistic, almost psychological, perspective. (And his books are funny!) His best-known work, Solaris, was twice made into a film, most recently in 2002. [Woefully out-of-date official site.]
posted by jdroth on Mar 27, 2006 - 87 comments

Bruce Sterling on the State of the World

Bruce Sterling : The State of the World (mp3) from the South By South West Media Conference. (SXSW)
posted by blue_beetle on Mar 17, 2006 - 33 comments

sad weekend

Added to the rolls of those that passed away this weekend. Octavia E. Butler Sci Fi writer, MacArthur Genius grant winner... And as she wrote. "I'm a 53-year-old writer who can remember being a 10-year-old writer and who expects someday to be an 80-year-old writer. I'm also comfortably asocial -- a hermit in the middle of Seattle -- a pessimist if I'm not careful, a feminist, a Black, a former Baptist, an oil-and-water combination of ambition, laziness, insecurity, certainty, and drive."
posted by edgeways on Feb 26, 2006 - 64 comments

The 10 Best Sci-Fi Films That Never Existed

The 10 Best Sci-Fi Films That Never Existed
posted by Tlogmer on Feb 13, 2006 - 157 comments

The TARDIS has landed

The Doctor is in! After passing on the series last year, the Sci-Fi Channel has decided to bring the BBC's new version of Doctor Who to American viewers. Neither the Beeb's news release or Sci-Fi's explain the turnaround. In any case, good news for stateside Whovians, as well as those who have not yet made the good Doctor's acquaintance.
posted by Artifice_Eternity on Jan 12, 2006 - 33 comments

Futurama

Futurama is probably coming back.
posted by Protocols of the Elders of Awesome on Jan 5, 2006 - 105 comments

Newest Doctor Who

Newest Doctor Who David Tennant received his first showcase tonight on the BBC's Children in Need Appeal in an excellent special episode written by Russell T Davies and also starring Billie Piper. In case anyone missed it, it's available online at their website, in streaming Real format. Fantastic!
posted by feelinglistless on Nov 18, 2005 - 28 comments

Michael Piller dies.

Michael Piller has died. The man who was the father of modern Star Trek and television sci-fi in general.
posted by feelinglistless on Nov 2, 2005 - 44 comments

a few thousand science fiction covers

a few thousand science fiction covers is a flash presentation of thousands of SF magazine covers from the fifties through today, arranged chronologically from left to right, and grouped by color from top to bottom.
posted by jonson on Oct 18, 2005 - 12 comments

I hope one of them gets Rush to do the soundtrack...

National Geek Day. Neil "Sandman" Gaiman & Joss "Buffy" Whedon both have movies coming out this weekend; in honor of the nerd confluence of events, Time magazine conducted a joint interview with the two.
posted by jonson on Sep 28, 2005 - 26 comments

Serenity

Serenity the Movie is coming out September 30th. The full-length movie version of Firefly, Fox's sci-fi disaster that was canceled 12 episodes into the 14 episode series.
posted by benkolb on Aug 10, 2005 - 69 comments

Xishi de Fanji

As others see us: A Chinese review of 'Revenge of the Sith'.

For those of you who don't know, George Lucas' latest oeuvre has bombed in mainland China's box-offices - $38.5M there, vs. the $312 it has earned domestically. A cultural difference, an error in Jos. Campbell's theory, or just something else, altogether? In any case, the film and it's apparent failure over there have made for some interesting reviews (last one via).
posted by vhsiv on Jun 9, 2005 - 64 comments

Star Wars Easter Eggs

Star Wars Easter Eggs (via Forever Geek)
posted by oissubke on May 27, 2005 - 17 comments

Wasting Precious Time

Make a story using public-domain images on this quirky little site. If you like that, you may like Inventing Situations which is a haven for people who used to frequent The Sci Fi Channel's now defunct Caption This! site. If you have no idea what I'm talking about, don't worry... it was all just a very lucid dream.
posted by E_B_A on Apr 11, 2005 - 2 comments

Time Travel: Take half a critical mass of plutonium back to meet itself.

A Guide to Science Fiction Chronophysics, a serious look at some of the hard questions ignored in soft-science fiction and fantasy. While we wish some time lines had never come to pass, or would go back in time and shake hands with themselves, there are circumstances that can lend themselves to great deal of fun.
posted by Jerub on Feb 27, 2005 - 14 comments

Makes Keanu look like Olivier

Straight outta Belgium, it's "The Matrix: The Beginning". This is a see-it-to-believe-it occasion. [20m WMV; Trailer for those with a lower tolerance for this sort of nonsense; Main site]
posted by Pretty_Generic on Feb 20, 2005 - 40 comments

Make it so, for fuck's sake.

Juvenile NSFW Star Trek video [Windows Media via B3ta]
posted by Pretty_Generic on Jan 28, 2005 - 35 comments

Scifi hoax and print on demand

PublishAmerica is having a rough month. After being sued by 150 authors who felt they were deceived by the company, and taking a beating a couple of days ago at the hands of the Washington Post, PublishAmerica has become the object of an elaborate hoax perpetrated by a group of science fiction writers, a novel called Atlanta Nights, by one Travis Tea. [more inside]
posted by mathowie on Jan 27, 2005 - 23 comments

The Force is One with this One

The One Man Star Wars Trilogy is a one-hour, high energy, nonstop blast through the first three Star Wars films. The catch is, there's only one cast member. Charles Ross, the writer and solo performer, spent too much of his childhood in a galaxy far, far away- adulthood has been similar. Ross plays all the characters, recreates the effects, sings the music, flies the ships, and fights both sides of the battles.
I'm not so sure I want to see him playing Carrie Fisher, especially in E6
posted by Hands of Manos on Jan 20, 2005 - 21 comments

Babes in Space

Babes in Space.
posted by greasy_skillet on Dec 29, 2004 - 14 comments

One for the Copper Tops.

Singularity, The. A black hole in the Extropian worldview whose gravity is so intense that no light can be shed on what lies beyond it. "Popular Science" talks about The Singularity, and asks "Is Science Fiction about to go blind?" Also, see previously, here and here.
posted by seanyboy on Sep 29, 2004 - 43 comments

If All Stories Were Written Like Science Fiction Stories

If All Stories Were Written Like Science Fiction Stories. "Roger and Ann needed to meet Sergey in San Francisco. 'Should we take a train, or a steamship, or a plane?' asked Ann. 'Trains are too slow, and the trip by steamship around South America would take months,' replied Roger. 'We’ll take a plane.'"
posted by Johnny Assay on Sep 26, 2004 - 47 comments

GeneModPuns

Genie Corp: The Splice Of Life. Creature Comforts [via BoingBoing]
posted by srboisvert on Jul 24, 2004 - 1 comment

ClassicSciFiModels

Space 1999 models. War of the Worlds, Flash Gordon, Alien and more. Welcome to the art of Martin Bower.
posted by srboisvert on Jul 15, 2004 - 13 comments

Where's my flying car? I want my flying car!!!

It's Official - the future sucks. Why has the future been such a let down? It's more 1984 than Barbarella. If we can have ID cards and video surveillance, then why can't we have intergalactic flying cars and hot chicks in skimpy plastic outfits? Clearly I'm not the only one wondering where all the cool stuff went - check out RetroFuture
posted by dodgygeezer on Jun 18, 2004 - 14 comments

Tintinnabulation

PDU-1 A Novella of the Remote Future.
posted by plexi on May 26, 2004 - 6 comments

Le Guin on Taoism, Utopia, and Feminism

The Guardian has a nice interview with Ursula K. Le Guin about utopian science fiction, anthropology, ethnicity in Earthsea and the differences between her two Earthsea trilogies. She also comments on the upcoming miniseries.
The Lathe of Heaven is a taoist novel, not a utopian or dystopian one.... There is an old American saying, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." The novel extends that a bit - "Even if it's broke, if you don't know how to fix it, don't."

posted by KirkJobSluder on Mar 11, 2004 - 20 comments

A group of nearby spaceships are not all oriented exacly like each other, in an upwards position.

Things We Will Never See On Star Trek
posted by Orange Goblin on Feb 5, 2004 - 39 comments

Asimov geekiness

Delicate. Abstract. Phallic. Gorgeously designed. Four pages of "rare and valuable" Isaac Asimov book covers. Some are truly beautiful. From West Virginia University's brand-new home for an Asimov geek's recently donated collection. [via the ever-useful ResearchBuzz]
posted by mediareport on Jan 22, 2004 - 17 comments

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