209 posts tagged with scotland.
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Pepsi Bru

Irn Bru Irn Bru Irn Bru
posted by the cuban on Dec 4, 2006 - 43 comments

Middle Eastern troops at Hadrian's Wall in the early fifth century

Iraqi peacekeepers sent to the Scottish border... 1600 years ago. The Notitia Dignitatum, the Roman equivalent of an organisation chart for the imperial bureaucracy in the fifth century, contains a reference to soldiers from the Tigris stationed at Hadrian's Wall. More on the Notitia here; more on Hadrian's Wall here, including a 3D tour of a fort near the Wall, and tablets discovered at another fort (including a request by a commanding officer for "more beer").
posted by greycap on Aug 19, 2006 - 8 comments

The Burryman

Every year the The Burryman makes his appearance at the Ferry Fair Festival. It has now been revealed how he copes with all that whisky.
posted by tellurian on Aug 13, 2006 - 13 comments

Scots' speech for the glaikit

Losh! That's a stoater of a web site!
posted by persona non grata on Jul 21, 2006 - 20 comments

3,000 Photographs of Glaswegians

3,000 photographs of Glaswegians taken by Glaswegians, between 1989 and 1992.
posted by jack_mo on Jul 13, 2006 - 27 comments

Inspirational Climber

Tom Weir, climber, writer, broadcaster and cult figure, best known for the show 'Weir's Way' has passed away at age 91. Recently honoured for bringing Scotlands environment and its issues to public attention. I'll be climbing a munro in rememberance. RIP.
posted by Shave on Jul 7, 2006 - 11 comments

Scotsmen giving things away? Whatever next..

Heard of Alasdair Gray? He's a legendary Scottish author/artist. He's 72. He wrote the astonishing Lanark. And now he's got his own blog. Where he's giving away a new play. So you can "re-write it in a dialect or language" you prefer, and "give it a different title and announce that the version is based upon my play."
posted by ascullion on Jul 1, 2006 - 14 comments

Glasgow lights

The Kingston Bridge, a neglected urban bridge in Glasgow was recently resurrected as a public work of art by Leni Schwendinger. Lighting was added under the bridge to highlight the architecture but it also reacted to use. The more traffic flowing on the roads above, the more red is displayed, as the tide rises, blues dominate, resulting in some pretty cool, ever-changing public art on a grand scale.
posted by mathowie on May 23, 2006 - 14 comments

The Survey of Scottish Witchcraft

The Survey of Scottish Witchcraft: A searchable database of people accused of witchcraft in Scotland between 1563 and 1736. Currently, 3,837 people have been identified, 3,212 by name. 113 cases involved fairies, 74 had a known political or property motive, 70 involved some aspect of "white magic". This is the real, and utterly fascinating, history of a hysteria that griped a country and a continent for more than a century. Religion, folk belief, fear and local relations all played out in witchhunts - and we still do not really understand why, why they started or why they ended. Projects like this one are invaluable to help us begin. (Co-developed by mefite Flitcraft)
posted by jb on Feb 20, 2006 - 17 comments

Scots/Irish in America and War

They fight OUR WARS Revenge of The Mutt People", by Joe Bageant is a striking essay about the hopelessness and pride of the impoverished decendants of Scots/Irish stock found in rural America. More information here. -from rigourous intuition-
posted by thedailygrowl on Jan 26, 2006 - 67 comments

Too much of a good thing

The ashes of the recently deceased contains high amounts of nutrient rich phosphates, just perfect for sprucing up that garden of yours. On the iconic peaks of Scotland though Mountaineers have decided that enough is enough.
posted by 0bvious on Jan 25, 2006 - 33 comments

Racing a clockwork orange

The Subway Challenge! Can one man get off the Glasgow underground at one stop, race the train to the next and get back on the same train? Mebbes aye, mebbes naw. (What? Want more underground? Here are some great photographs from before and after its 1970s restoration)
posted by bonaldi on Jan 22, 2006 - 61 comments

hey, mcCloud, get off of my ewe

SCOTTISH ARCHITECTURE plus
posted by Phantast on Jul 12, 2005 - 5 comments

The Golden Spurtle

Porridge. Lots of Porridge. Not the (allegedly) classic BBC TV comedy, but the stuff you make from oats and that's fed generations of Scots. And now you too can attempt to win the Golden Spurtle and be crowned the World Porridge Making Champion. Some light relief for a Monday..
posted by Nugget on Jun 13, 2005 - 10 comments

Scotsman Newspaper Digital Archive 1817-1950

Edinburgh's Scotsman newspaper has launched a digital archive covering all editions from 1817-1950. There are several stories with an American slant which may be something that interests you. There is coverage on such things as the hanging of the notorious bodysnatchers Burke and Hare. Unfortunately, after viewing the free archives it is a paysite, but I still think it's worth a look as there is easily a couple of hours of interesting reading on the free articles that are included. The set-up and look of this site is brilliant as well.
posted by ClanvidHorse on Jun 4, 2005 - 9 comments

The dear green place?

Best laid schemes? Back in 1945 the Bruce Plan [click on images for video footage] was a radical proposal to knock down, and then rebuild, the Victorian centre of the city of Glasgow. The city’s slums* would be cleared; new towns* would be established; Glasgow would rise again, triumphant, once again the second city of the Empire*. In 1971*, there were grand visions of the Glasgow of the future; the Glasgow of tomorrow would be a bright, shining new city, and the Clyde* would once again be something to be proud of. A fascinating film archive of the Glasgow of the 20th century. *All links contain embedded video goodness.
posted by Len on May 17, 2005 - 13 comments

Alexander the Corrector

The Man Who Unwrote the Bible. In the mid-1720s, Alexander Cruden took on a self-imposed task of Herculean proportions: he decided to compile the most thorough concordance of the King James Version of the Bible (777,746 words). The first edition of Cruden's Concordance was published in 1737. Every similar undertaking before or since has been the work of a vast team of people. Cruden worked alone in his lodgings, writing the whole thing out by hand. Cruden's day job was as a "Corrector of the Press" (proofreader). He would give hawk-eyed attention to prose all day long. Then he would come home at night to read the Bible—stopping at every single word to secure the right sheet from the tens of thousands of pieces of paper all around him and to record accurately the reference in its appropriate place. He had no patron, no publisher, no financial backers: his only commission was a divine one.
Cruden's Concordance has never been out of print. A new book tells the tale of Alexander the Corrector's bizarre, sad life (scroll down to about half page).
posted by matteo on Apr 3, 2005 - 10 comments

Super Cooper

Davie Cooper was one of Scotland's greatest ever players. Today sees two of his former clubs Rangers and Motherwell battle it out in a cup final, or Coop final as it has been called. A fitting tribute if ever there was one.
posted by the cuban on Mar 20, 2005 - 7 comments

Crime, politics, romance, emigration, humour, tragedy, royalty and superstitions

The Word on the Street :: A collection of over 1800 broadsides published in Scotland between 1650 and 1910, featuring both digital images of the original Broadsides as well as transcriptons of the texts. You can just review the highlights or search or browse the entire collection.
posted by anastasiav on Feb 20, 2005 - 13 comments

Follies

Follies and Monuments Devoted to the history of English architecture fantastic, outrageous, and (to borrow from the quotation on the index page) "useless." See also this 3D model of William Beckford's Fonthill Abbey (and the facsimile reprint of A Description of Fonthill Abbey and Demesne); folly gardens, historical and current; and a famous French folly garden, the Désert de Retz.
posted by thomas j wise on Jan 2, 2005 - 8 comments

Fry me for an oyster

Fried Beyond Belief: You're disgusting. But why shouldn't you be? If Elvis were on the blue today, WWES?
posted by ewkpates on Dec 9, 2004 - 18 comments

Ach! A Wee Haggis!

Haggis Hunt 2004/2005. Well, now, lads and lassies! 'Tis time to seek out that "Great Chieftan o the Puddin-race!"
Look for them. Learn about them. Or just smack them silly.
posted by grabbingsand on Dec 1, 2004 - 3 comments

Philosophy

The eighteenth-century Scottish Enlightenment.
posted by semmi on Oct 7, 2004 - 5 comments

Gettin involvit in the Scottish Pairlament

Gettin involvit in the Scottish Pairlament The Scottish Pairlament is here for tae represent aw Scotland's folk. We want tae mak siccar that as mony folk as can is able tae find oot aboot whit the Scottish Pairlament dis and whit wey it warks.
posted by xmutex on Sep 10, 2004 - 16 comments

The complete history of englands missed penalty kicks.

Today is world celebrate Scottishness day. View the complete history of Englands missed penalty kicks and the Scottish national liberation armys website whilst having a wee dram with tunes played on Scotlands national instrument , the midi player lilting in the background.
posted by sgt.serenity on Jun 24, 2004 - 14 comments

Muckle bonnie wirds

Dictionary of the Scots Language. The two major historical dictionaries of the Scots language, the Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue (DOST) and the Scottish National Dictionary (SND), have been combined into one searchable online edition:
Thus, information on the earliest uses of Scots words can be presented alongside examples of the later development and, in some cases, current usage of the same words. In this way, we hope that the DSL will allow users to appreciate the continuity and historical development of the Scots language. By making the DSL freely available on the Internet, we also aim to widen access to the source dictionaries and to open up these rich lexicographic resources to anyone with an interest in Scots language and culture.
posted by languagehat on Apr 2, 2004 - 13 comments

Morrice Web

Morrice Web: Photography from Scotland.
posted by hama7 on Mar 7, 2004 - 2 comments

Burns Night

Burns Night. 'Robert Burns: poet and balladeer, Scotland's favourite son and champion of the common people. Each year on January 25, the great man's presumed birthday, Scots everywhere take time out to honour a national icon. Whether it's a full-blown Burns Supper or a quiet night of reading poetry, Burns Night is a night for all Scots.'
More on the Robert Burns Tribute site.
posted by plep on Jan 23, 2004 - 3 comments

Bobby

Don't Miss Bobby Gillespie's Fantasy Festival On Saturday And Sunday! It's on BBC's rather good Radio 6. Just a heads-up to admirers of Primal Scream's constantly astonishing vocalist and producer - and, yes, the Rolling Stones are in. Strangely out are other Great Scots like Ivor Cutler and Roddy Frame, to mention only other undisputed geniuses. As a bonus, here's The Scotsman's very intelligent list of the 100 Best Scottish Albums. And don't mention Postcard Records! Ah, the "Sound of Young Scotland"... some dead; some turning 40. What and who are the new Scottish talents? *sigh*
posted by MiguelCardoso on Jan 21, 2004 - 15 comments

This is the most draconian legislation applied to the hapless, wheezing, over-charged, over-taxed, broken-winded, bronchitic, catarrhal, modern smoker.

The Death of the Irish Pub? "The smoking ban is the work of one man, Michael Martin, the Minister for Health and Children, and one of nature's killjoys... He is generally thought to regard the banning of nicotine from Irish pubs as a personal crusade, explaining that he once tried smoking but didn't enjoy it."

The ban was scheduled to start today, but has been delayed until March. It's one thing to have smoking banned in California and New York, but what's the point of pub that's not dark and smoky? And Scotland might be next...
posted by grabbingsand on Jan 1, 2004 - 122 comments

vitamin q | a temple of trivia and lists

Scottish puzzle writer, poet, and soon to be author Roddy Lumsden pens vitamin q, a weblog devoted to, as he puts it, "trivia lists, curiosities, and fragments which please me as a connoisseur of the sequential and the inconsequential - it's more a cave of wonder than a grotto of geekery". Vitamin q is the place to go if you need to know 75 terms for being drunk, want lists of fruits and vegetables that have been used as derogatory slang, need the names of the My Little Ponies, or have always wondered which singers have been heralded as "The New Bob Dylan". The archives are bursting with more of the same.
posted by iconomy on Dec 29, 2003 - 9 comments

Hunt the Haggis!

Now that they've found Saddam, it's time to hunt the haggis!
posted by moonbird on Dec 14, 2003 - 5 comments

It canna be!

Scotland shamed: Japan wins whisky challenge. The Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre hosted a tasting in Toronto, and a 20-year-old Nikka Yoichi, distilled in Hokkaido, beat out a 16-year-old Lagavulin (my own favorite) and 12-year-old whiskies from Cragganmore and Balvenie (also excellent). This is reminiscent of the 1976 tasting in which California wines beat out French ones and put California on the map; can America someday produce a world-class scotch-type whisky (the preferred spelling in Scotland), or shall we simply continue to take pride in our bourbon and rye?
posted by languagehat on Nov 25, 2003 - 37 comments

When architects have too much Irn Bru

Construction of the Scottish Parliament in Pictures. The site was way over its budget even before they'd started building it, but it's nice to see they're at least doing something creative with the design. Being a lucky soul, I get to walk past this monstrosity every single day.
posted by bwerdmuller on Oct 10, 2003 - 15 comments

Whisky of Mass Destruction

Weapons of Mass Drunkenness. The ever vigilante U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency has been monitoring the web cams at the Bruichladdich Scotch Whisky Distillery on Islay island, Scotland, to make sure the facilities are not being used to make chemical weapons. I, for one, am glad to know that my government takes the safety of whiskey distilleries seriously. [First link via Boing Boing.]
posted by homunculus on Sep 27, 2003 - 12 comments

But where are the Frenchmen?

They come in quest of the Grail. Some people believe the Holy Grail is hidden someplace in or beneath this small fifteenth-century chapel near Edinburgh. Or maybe it contains other knowledge and relics acquired by the Knights Templar in Jerusalem. Or perhaps . . . well, there's not much that someone at some time has not believed about Rosslyn Chapel.
posted by Man-Thing on Sep 11, 2003 - 20 comments

Political prisoner

The prison diary of Scottish Parliament MP (and successful self-publicist) Tommy Sheridan, jailed for seven days (not for the first time) for refusing to pay a fine imposed after he was found guilty of a breach of the peace while demonstrating at Faslane against nuclear weapons.
posted by ascullion on Sep 2, 2003 - 7 comments

National Library of Scotland

The National Library of Scotland and its interesting collection of online exhibits : the Murthly Hours, an illuminated book of hours (folios here); 16th century maps of Scotland; playbills from Edinburgh's Theatre Royal; 16th century Scottish books; the albums of the Edinburgh Calotype Club; R.L. Stevenson; Robert Burns; World War I stories; more.
posted by plep on Jun 24, 2003 - 2 comments

Court Decision - Internet Jokes Found Illegal For Misleading Stupid People

In the first of two stories from Scotland's Scotland on Sunday newspaper, a father is found selling his son into child slavery on the internet. The child is rescued by a vigilant Canadian woman living in the US. - A tale of gullibillitie (that's the new spelling of "gullibility")
posted by Blue Stone on May 3, 2003 - 1 comment

Orkney and Other Scottish Islands

Orkneyjar. The history, folklore and traditions of the Orkney Islands - ghost stories, megaliths, and more on this extensive site.
Related interest :- St. Kilda: Death of an Island Republic. A matriarchal society? Via Utopia Britannica: British Utopian Experiments 1325-1945.
More :- the National Trust's St. Kilda website; the Iona community, an ecumenical community founded in 1938 (more about the founding of the monastery on Iona by St. Columba in 563); independent Eigg; life in Westray, one of Orkney's north isles; the Shetland Museum.
posted by plep on Apr 26, 2003 - 7 comments

'Ock, where's my car?'

An Edinburgh man got back from holiday to find his car had gone missing. It hadn't been stolen. It had been moved by the local council because it was obstructing some drain and hadn't bothered to tell him. How far can local government authority really go in matters of personal property? [more]
posted by feelinglistless on Jan 29, 2003 - 36 comments

O wad some Power the giftie gie us

O wad some Power the giftie gie us -To see oursels as ithers see us! Put on your Sporrans and join me for a wee dram and a bite of Haggis, as Scotland celebrates its national bard ,William Mcgonagal. Oops , i mean Robert Burns.
posted by sgt.serenity on Jan 25, 2003 - 16 comments

Hogmanay ya Bass !

Hogmanay ya Bass! wishing everyone a guid New year : )
posted by sgt.serenity on Dec 31, 2002 - 6 comments

The Pain of History

Welcome to Magdalene Asylums. Now a film, the Asylums were generally staffed by the Sisters of Mercy, and were found throughout Ireland and Scotland.
posted by The Jesse Helms on Nov 29, 2002 - 7 comments

What Would The Good Doctor Have Prescribed?

What Would The Good Doctor Have Prescribed? A Samuel Johnson quotation for every possible occasion, assembled by Frank Lynch. To be taken daily, along with Jack Lynch's Guide, while we wait for David Lynch's upcoming Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland. [Quicktime unrequired, as I made that last bit up]
posted by MiguelCardoso on Nov 7, 2002 - 11 comments

Should majorities also have a say?

Should majorities also have a say? Why doesn't Russia get to vote on Chechen independence? Why can't Britain vote on expelling Northern Ireland ... or the English on Scottish devolution? Should minorities be allowed to hold a gun to the heads of the majority?
posted by bonaldi on Nov 4, 2002 - 35 comments

andy goldsworthy's current project

andy goldsworthy's current project
over the course of a month, artist andy goldsworthy will create works each day in the countryside surrounding his home in scotland, photograph them, and email the photographs to a gallery in san francisco where they will be printed out, and hung on a wall.
in a time when much conceptual art seems increasingly abstract and difficult, goldsworthy's work feels -- at least to me -- accessible, comforting, and wonderful.
what are some other artists that elicit that response in mefi readers? who's work do you like and want to share?
posted by dolface on Oct 31, 2002 - 13 comments

"Al Qaeda Scotland"

"Al Qaeda Scotland" targets the Edinburgh Festival with a leaflet campaign and no-one seems to be doing anything about it. Don't like this man's chances of getting away with it in London or New York.
posted by Summer on Jul 31, 2002 - 12 comments

Scotland's drug minister declares the war on drugs over.

Scotland's drug minister declares the war on drugs over. "The only time you will hear me use terms such as 'War On Drugs' and 'Just Say No' is to denigrate them." [Link via DanceSafe]
posted by bingo on Mar 8, 2002 - 16 comments

Happy Holidays--IN HELL!!

Happy Holidays--IN HELL!! I think someone in Scotland has been watching too much "South Park".
posted by gimonca on Dec 2, 2001 - 15 comments

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