480 posts tagged with sculpture.
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Orsini's Sacro Busco, or the Park of Monsters

Count Pier Francesco Orsini (Google auto-translate) was a man much given to melancholy. The premature death of his wife, Giulia Farnese, and other troubles contributing to the decay of the once proud Orsini dynasty, darkened his outlook on life. Like the world-hating Jacques in Shakespeare's As You Like It, he seems to have come to regard the world around him with a somewhat self-advertising disgust. Orsini retreated noisily from the world of human affairs into nature, albeit a nature much improved by art (Google books preview). Those improvements came in the form of larger-than-life sculptures, some sculpted in the bedrock, which populated Sacro Bosco ("Sacred Grove"), colloquially called Parco dei Mostri ("Park of the Monsters"). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 27, 2015 - 5 comments

Don’t be afraid or embarrassed to stare at it

Artist Teresita Fernández muses on the creative process.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 27, 2015 - 5 comments

DNA sculptures in London

London art trail: 'What's in your DNA?' | sculpture gallery | map. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 20, 2015 - 1 comment

Benjamin Shine - Tulle Works

Benjamin Shine is a fashion designer and fabric artist, who has done some fantastic three dimensional works created in tulle. He talks about and demonstrates his process with an iron and thread in this video.
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 11, 2015 - 3 comments

Antelope? More like antelnope.

Kate Clark is an artist who uses clay to sculpt human faces for taxidermied animals. You can easily browse the gallery by starting here and using the arrow navigation in the top right.
posted by phunniemee on Jul 27, 2015 - 20 comments

Blaine Gibson, sculptor and Disney Legend, dead at 97

If you've ever visited a Disney theme park, you likely saw the work of Blaine Gibson. Gibson died earlier this month at the age of 97. [more inside]
posted by kimberussell on Jul 7, 2015 - 10 comments

I didn't think it was physically possible, but this both sucks and blows

French magician and juggler Antoine Terrieux created a series of remarkably self-sustaining sculptures using different arrangements of hair dryers, and has also incorporated them in funny ways in his stage performance. He also plays with a diabolo in ways that seem to defy gravity. [via]
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 19, 2015 - 19 comments

Niki de Saint Phalle

‘I shot against Daddy, all men, small men, tall men, big men, fat men, men, my brother, society, the church, the convent, school, my family, my mother, all men, daddy, myself, men. I shot because it was fun and made me feel great. I shot because I was fascinated watching the painting bleed and die…’— Niki de Saint Phalle. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Jun 12, 2015 - 10 comments

More items from Shaun Tan's federal department of odds and ends

Shaun Tan (previously, twice) is most identified with his distinctly surreal style of 2D still art, but he has also worked in sculpted and animated forms, as seen in his pieces inspired by recently revised stories of the Brothers Grimm, and The Lost Thing, a short film based on his book of the same name.
posted by filthy light thief on May 26, 2015 - 4 comments

Re-keyed

Michael Moerkirk makes metal into art.
posted by Deoridhe on May 11, 2015 - 3 comments

A Plasma Cutter as a Delicate Sculpting Tool

Artist Cal Lane uses an industrial plasma-cutter (called a "blowtorch" in the links) to convert salvaged metal into lacy and delicate sculptures. [via] [more inside]
posted by quin on Apr 23, 2015 - 11 comments

Masao Kinoshita

Masao Kinoshita makes sculptures of bizarre anthropomorphic animals and animal-human hybrids, often with their musculature exposed.
posted by escabeche on Apr 9, 2015 - 16 comments

Peaseblossom, Cobweb, Mote, and Mustardseed — in galvanized wire

Fantasywire: wire sculptures with a twist
Inspired by an inexplicable real life encounter, these galvanised or stainless wire sculptures make the perfect statement piece for the bottom of any garden. Every fairy is a handmade sculpture uniquely crafted to your desired pose and installation requirements.
[more inside]
posted by Lexica on Mar 14, 2015 - 19 comments

I have no idea how these people got their stones wedged into their walls

Dry stone walls have been built since possibly as early as 5000 BC but can also be works of art.
posted by walrus on Mar 11, 2015 - 24 comments

City of a Thousand Spires, One Of Which Has Giant Babies On It

A Tour of David Černý's Prague. David Černý is shaping Prague’s personality - one sculpture at a time. (previously)
posted by bq on Mar 3, 2015 - 5 comments

UNFINISHED

Robert Bruno labored for decades to build one of America’s most striking houses, but died before he could complete it. Is there a way to preserve his work and legacy? [more inside]
posted by jenkinsEar on Feb 5, 2015 - 9 comments

"A fetishized nostalgia for the 1970s and early '80s"

​​​​They Say Art Is Dead in New York. They're Wrong. – Alan Feuer, NYT ​(December 2014):
Somehow, in the last few years, it has become an article of faith that New York has lost its artistic spirit, that the city's long run as a capital of culture is over. After all (or so the argument goes), foreign oligarchs and hedge-fund traders have bought up all the real estate, chased away the artists and turned the bohemia that once ran east from Chumley's clear across the Williamsburg Bridge into a soulless playground of money.

Last year, the foremost proponent of this doomsday theory was the rock star David Byrne, who complained in The Guardian that artists, as a species, had been priced out of New York. This year, others joined him. The novelist Zadie Smith lamented in October, in The New York Review of Books, that the city's avant-garde had all but disappeared. The musician Moby wrote a comparable essay in February, describing how creative types are fleeing New York and referring to his former home, accurately but narrowly, as "the city of money." Just a couple of weeks ago, Robert Elmes, the founder of the Galápagos Art Space in Brooklyn, declared the indigenous "creative ecosystem" was in crisis — so, naturally, he was moving to Detroit.

posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jan 17, 2015 - 64 comments

Blooming Zoetrope Sculptures

"When the sculptures are spun at just the right frequency under a strobe light, a rather magical effect occurs: the sculptures seem to be animated or alive!"

These 3D printed sculptures were designed by artist, inventor, and Stanford design lecturer John Edmark using Fibonacci's sequence to determine the placement of the appendages. They appear animated when their rotation speed is synchronized to a strobe so that one flash occurs every time the sculpture turns 137.5º - though in the video above, the camera was set to a very short shutter speed (1/4000 sec) to achieve the effect without using a strobe. Here's a clip of just one sculpture with the strobe going.
posted by polymath on Jan 17, 2015 - 10 comments

By leaves we live

The mystery Edinburgh book sculptor has given her first interview
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Jan 13, 2015 - 11 comments

Power of Art

Simon Schama's Power of Art is available in full. Part 1 Caravaggio. Part 2 Bernini. Part 3 Rembrandt. Part 4 David. Part 5 Turner. Part 6 Van Gogh. Part 7 Picasso. Part 8 Rothko. [more inside]
posted by cwest on Dec 21, 2014 - 11 comments

The Enduring Art of the Lowcountry Basket

Grass Roots: The Enduring Art of the Lowcountry Basket (video 27:21). Sweetgrass Baskets: "This basket-making tradition came to South Carolina in the 17th century by way of West African slaves who were brought to America to work on plantations." The Sweetgrass Basket Tradition: "Sweetgrass basketmaking has been part of the Charleston and Mt. Pleasant communities for more than 300 years." Sweetgrass Baskets: A History (pdf): "Coiled basketry, one of the oldest African crafts in America, appeared in South Carolina during the late 17th century." The South Carolina Lowcountry. Sweetgrass (Muhlenbergia filipes). [more inside]
posted by cwest on Dec 17, 2014 - 8 comments

Celebrating a notable artist... who also happens to be "special."

Fiber artist Judith Scott's style of assemblage sculpture may not be your cup of tea, but even her critics are impressed with the complexity and originality of her found object bundles. The Brooklyn Museum of Art is running the first US survey of her works through March. Her work is every bit on par with more famous assemblage artists like Robert Rauschenberg, made more remarkable by the fact that she was not only a mostly untrained "oustider artist," but Ms. Scott was born with Down's Syndrome and was almost completely deaf and mute.
posted by cross_impact on Dec 3, 2014 - 10 comments

The Hovering Angel Takes Wing

[Ernst] Barlach’s memorial ["Der Schwebende Engel," or The Hovering Angel] is unusual and unique. Detached from earth and time, with folded arms and closed eyes, the hovering figure expresses an internalized vision of the grief and sufferings of war. When the Nazis came to power in the 1930s, Barlach’s works were among the first to be declared Entartete Kunst (‘degenerate art’) and confiscated and removed from public display. Sadly, Barlach died in 1938, knowing that his masterwork had been taken down to be melted and probably made into war munitions. However, some courageous friends had managed to hide a second cast, which was then hung in the Antoniter Church in Cologne after the end of the Second World War.
The British Museum welcomes Ernst Barlach's Der Schwebende to its exhibition "Germany: memories of a nation." [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Nov 6, 2014 - 4 comments

Art finds a way.

Controversial public art is nothing new in Colorado, the state whose largest airport welcomes you with Blucifer, the red-eyed demon mustang who tragically killed his own sculptor. But for many citizens of Durango, CO, this summer's $28,000 installation of Tom Holmes' piece "Arc of History" wasn't unsettling so much as simply aesthetically insipid. Described as "a giant stone Batman signal," "a flying piece of excrement at the intersection of Highways 160 and 550," or more succinctly, "Turd Rock," Arc of History drew little praise until last week, when an anonymous local resident placed a handmade dinosaur head atop the sculpture on Halloween. But Arc of History's new Mesozoic look was not to be. On Monday afternoon, police received a call that a group of local youth had pilfered the head, sending Durango residents in an uproar. On Wednesday evening, the Durango Herald reported that the dinosaur head had been surrendered to police custody: [more inside]
posted by deludingmyself on Nov 6, 2014 - 81 comments

turn, turn, turn

Machine With Concrete, By Arthur Ganson
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 2, 2014 - 25 comments

Menagerie Phantasmagoria

The fantastic animal sculptures of Ellen Jewett.
posted by cenoxo on Oct 26, 2014 - 4 comments

Painting with plywood, returning scrap wood to organic forms

Henrique Oliveira "paints" in three dimensions with plywood, as he describes it in a short interview with Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland. The video focuses on a 2012 work in progress, Carambóxido, which is made from, and still smells like, industrial debris found in the Flats and along the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. The artist, who hails from São Paulo, is most recognized for his large installation pieces that burst through gallery walls and coil around pillars, appearing to grow from the spaces around them. You can see many more of his paintings, sculptures and installations at Oliveira's own website, which requires flash to navigate.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 24, 2014 - 7 comments

The Phantasmagoric Work of Mr. Gober

Robert Gober's 40-year survey "The Heart is Not a Metaphor" is now on view at the MoMA, and it's a fantastic freakin' spectacle to the eye.
posted by ourt on Oct 20, 2014 - 10 comments

"the mainstreaming of Dadaism"

The Cult of Jeff Koons 🐩
posted by Invisible Green Time-Lapse Peloton on Oct 14, 2014 - 58 comments

Paper birds

Diana Beltran Herrera sculpts beautiful birds out of paper. She's currently working on a series based on postage stamps; you can see some of the new birds on her Facebook page. [via]
posted by jacquilynne on Sep 29, 2014 - 12 comments

Hidden patterns even in the most mundane of objects

Mathematician Zachary Abel builds impressive Mathematical Sculptures from office supplies and other household objects. [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Aug 29, 2014 - 12 comments

Sirens of the Sea

Wave instruments: San Francisco's gurgly Wave Organ; Blackpool's moaning High Tide Organ; Zadar's hypnotic Sea Organ. [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Aug 14, 2014 - 10 comments

Art as armor

Linda Stein's wearable sculptural avatars
Linda Stein wants people to armor themselves in her art. She creates full-length wearable sculptures embedded with all manner of found objects, including driftwood, engraving plates, steel wire, zippers, pebbles and comic book imagery of superheroes.
  [more inside]
posted by Lexica on Jul 27, 2014 - 4 comments

Playgrounds as nightmare fuel

Creepy masterpieces of sculpture and landscaping masquerading as children's playgrounds. Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 12, 2014 - 21 comments

An interactive paper sculpture

“Every time the paper blade falls a camera will be triggered to capture the expression of the those who have put their neck on the line for an art experience like no other. Each fearful facial expression, forever immortalized on the PaperCuts-Exhibtion.com.”
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Jul 12, 2014 - 10 comments

"A Subtlety" & We Are Here

Why I Yelled at the Kara Walker Exhibit: "Anger shot up my body like a hot thermometer. Face flushed, I walked to the Mammy sphinx. Couples posed in front of it, smiling as others took their photos. So here it was, an artwork about how Black people’s pain was transformed into money was a tourist attraction for them... Something snapped... I yelled that this was our history and that many of us were angry and sad that it was a site of pornographic jokes." [more inside]
posted by flex on Jul 2, 2014 - 170 comments

Gilbert Legrand

Gilbert Legrand creates characters out of ordinary objects. More at his website.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on Jun 20, 2014 - 2 comments

Inside and Out

Cao Hui is a Chinese artist who seeks the "inner reaches of things" like furniture, classical sculpture, and clothing. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 12, 2014 - 6 comments

"Everyone On Wall Street Is A Dick."

The two-day Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) graduate showcase at NYU was a madhouse, with some 100 projects on view, ranging from groundbreaking innovations to timely trinkets. But the most talked about project by far was Peiqi Su's "Penis Wall" - an array of 81 robotic phalli that rise and fall in response to the stock market. Official Vimeo account for the project - Thesis presentation - in depth How-it-was-made production blog. (Slightly NSFW if your work doesn't like white, plastic, abstract dicks.)
posted by The Whelk on May 23, 2014 - 14 comments

The Marvelous Sugar Baby

An NPR interview with the creator of a 75 foot long Mammy-Sphinx sculpture made entirely of sugar. Award-winning artist Kara Walker's latest work challenges viewers to confront the relationships between American history, racism, slavery, and industrialization. Her exhibition is held in the soon-to-be-demolished, historic Domino Sugar Factory. (New Yorker article) [more inside]
posted by warm_planet on May 16, 2014 - 34 comments

Hominin paleoartistry

Élisabeth Daynès and John Gurche (not connected in any way, AFAIK) are among a few paleoartists who specialize in sculpting models of ancient hominin species, such as Sahelanthropus tchadensis (Daynes), Australopithecus boisei (Gurche), Australopithecus africanus (Daynes), Homo floresiensis (Gurche), and charismatic favorite Homo neanderthalensis (Daynes, Gurche). [more inside]
posted by ChuckRamone on May 9, 2014 - 11 comments

Putting a bug in your gear

Justin Gershenson-Gates makes insects and spiders from mechanical watch parts. The Verge shows more pictures including one of a piece under construction, more photos are on Inhabitat, there are yet more photos at Twisted Sifter, and the artist has a personal website.
posted by bile and syntax on Apr 25, 2014 - 6 comments

36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips

36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips (SL video)
posted by Chrischris on Apr 23, 2014 - 32 comments

That's right. Somebody called the cops on Jesus.

Statue Of A Homeless Jesus Startles A Wealthy Community
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 13, 2014 - 165 comments

"When You Realize What You Are Looking At You Will Be Blown Away"

Twenty Seven pieces of artwork that defy comprehension; not because of the quality of work, which is amazing, but for the quality of work performed in the mediums used. [more inside]
posted by quin on Apr 13, 2014 - 52 comments

The Ice Lady

"It gets pretty lonely working in the freezer on my own." A beautiful portrait of Anne Marie Taberdo, the only female ice sculptor in the UK.
posted by secretdark on Apr 11, 2014 - 1 comment

Metropolis II

Metropolis II - A film about a sculpture by Chris Burden
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Mar 3, 2014 - 8 comments

DRR... DRR... DRR...

Steve Jobs Memorial Statue Has Been Unveiled And... It's Hideous
posted by Evilspork on Feb 26, 2014 - 153 comments

Apollo of Gaza

Fisherman find an ancient Greek bronze statue in the waters off the coast of Gaza. Now the question is how it can be preserved and what its ultimate fate will be. Here Apollo is lying on Smurf sheets (photo from an Italian article). (Previously on underwater archaeology in the Mediterranean.)
posted by larrybob on Feb 9, 2014 - 38 comments

Pangs piercing every muscle, every labouring nerve

In The Natural History, Pliny the Elder mentioned "the Laocoön [...]* in the palace of the Emperor Titus, a work that may be looked upon as preferable to any other production of the art of painting or of statuary." Pliny ascribed the sculpture to three sculptors from Rhodes, Agesander, Athenodoros, and Polydoros; it is possible that they (or some of their descendants) were also responsible for a cluster of similarly-themed statues found in the 1950s at Sperlonga. In any event, the Laocoön was discovered in 1506 and purchased by Pope Julius II. [more inside]
posted by thomas j wise on Feb 7, 2014 - 22 comments

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