7 posts tagged with sculpture and film.
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This is the Way I Love

Ellie Castellanos is a severely autistic thirteen year old artist whose prolific drawn art, animation, films, photographs and clay sculptures all share a distinctly colorful, vibrant and upbeat style. Her mother maintains an online gallery of her work, as well as sharing her story as it develops on the site and in a blog. She has also notably used Rickrolling as inspiration to create beautiful art. [more inside]
posted by byanyothername on Dec 9, 2013 - 5 comments

"If we could build a fourteen-foot-tall alien queen, we’d be able to build a twenty-foot-tall T-rex"

Sculpting a Full-Size Dinosaur at Stan Winston Studio‬
posted by cthuljew on Dec 21, 2012 - 8 comments

arts & crafts blogging, subset: geek

Geek Art Gallery features many different kinds of geek-related art in round-ups and posts: art installations, animation, comics, film shorts, paintings, photography, sculpture - even desserts. Specifically craft-focused geek blogs: Geek Crafts and Sprite Stitch (previously)
posted by flex on Aug 12, 2012 - 1 comment

All my own work

'I'd like 11 and a half tons of resin, please': the artisans behind the artists
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Apr 1, 2012 - 32 comments

Documentaries on art and artists

Gestalten TV - Exploring Visual Culture. A series of documentaries on (mostly) art and artists.
posted by dobbs on Nov 1, 2010 - 2 comments

Len Lye: stuff that moves and makes noises

Len Lye: New Zealander Len Lye was a restless maverick - a pioneer of films without cameras (drawing directly onto the celluloid) and kinetic art (CD available through Atoll, sound samples here and here), and he was also quite handy with poems and inks. More about his Windwand and recently installed Waterwhirler on Flickr. Coralised open directory of short Waterwhirler movies here.
posted by nylon on May 30, 2006 - 7 comments

In reviewing ‘A beautiful mind’ NYT reviewer said of Nash

In reviewing ‘A beautiful mind’ NYT reviewer said of Nash "Before he married Alicia …he fathered another child…. and abandoned both mother and child to poverty. He formed a number of intense, apparently sexual bonds with other men, and he lost his security clearance ….. after he was arrested for soliciting sex in a men's room. When his illness became intractable and his behavior intolerable, Alicia divorced him. …. None of this has made it to the screen." It went on to say that "The story ….egregiously simplifies the tangled, suspicious world of cold war academia." Most other reviewers appears to have judged that movie on its merits as a work of art and seemed to like it. Recently, the plans to build a statue to honor the FDNY firefighters were dropped after a controvery broke out over plans to alter the original image of three firefighters hoisting the American flag. In an article that tried to put the later controvery in a context, NYT said that that "Sculptors, and artists in general, always take liberties". Conservative columnist Jonah Golderg in a different column defended the sanctity of ‘factual accuracy' in art. I rarely agree with Goldberg. But I think if one is depicting an event or a likeness of an event one has an obligation to stay close to the truth. Where do you draw the line between creative freedom and factual accuracy?
posted by justlooking on Jan 20, 2002 - 27 comments

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