484 posts tagged with sculpture.
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Limited Stature

"It is very rare I am lost for words but I saw the statue last week and it is awesome - a tremendous tribute to a great man. [Southampton] Fans have waited a long time for this and it is going to be fantastic. I really believe it will be the best football statue anywhere both in size and the amount of detail" -- Ted Bates Trust chairman Dave Ford

Then again, maybe not.
posted by crumbly on Mar 27, 2007 - 38 comments

The pataphysical world of Fred Lane.

I talk to my haircut. The Rev. Dr. Fred Lane was a dada jazzbo as part of the Raudelunas scene in Tuscaloosa, Alabama in the 70s and 80s. His real name is T. R. Reed, and he's a creator of wonderful whirligigs. There's also a documentary in the works (careful of your eyes on that page).
posted by sleepy pete on Mar 27, 2007 - 13 comments

In The Womb

Outstanding collection of 18th century obstetrical models at the Anatomical Museum in Modena, Italy. NSFW, the teratology section at the end is especially gruesome. [via]
posted by bobobox on Mar 15, 2007 - 25 comments

It's all gotta melt sometime

The World Ice Art Championships are being held in Fairbanks, Alaska this week. If you can't be there to see this year's sculptures, you can view last year's winners in both the single block and the multi-block divisions. You can also see many stunning entries from previous years.
posted by cubby on Mar 12, 2007 - 15 comments

sweet dreams around the world

The art of sugar: flowers, lace, birds, sculpture, cubes, gardens, construction site, houses, paintings, underwear. In Britain. In Mexico sugar skulls are created to celebrate the Day of the Dead. Amezaiku is a Japanese candy craft and wagashi the art of Japanese confection.
posted by nickyskye on Mar 11, 2007 - 14 comments

Gummi Art

Artist Ya Ya Chou works in several materials, the most interesting being gummi bears. The Mommy, The Candelabras, and sculptures are nice, but the Bear Rug is not to be missed. The best piece is the Chandelier, which apparently is perfectly fine after two years.
posted by mathowie on Mar 9, 2007 - 16 comments


John Waddell went to show his friends his latest masterpiece "The Gathering" only to find it stolen. Bronze statues can take Waddell 10 years to create and the piece was worth $384,000. The statues which made up the piece weighed between 750 lb - 1500 lb which could make the thieves up to $32,000 from the scrap metal, a minor fraction of their real worth. It is not the first time thieves have used art for scrap metal.
posted by Count on Mar 5, 2007 - 27 comments

The Knitting Machine

The Knitting Machine is a performance art piece/sculpture by Providence artist Dave Cole. Cole's other works include a Memorial Flag made out of toy soldiers and a size 8 dress made entirely out of money.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Mar 5, 2007 - 3 comments

Carved Eggshell Art

Christel Assante carves eggshells into extraordinary pieces of art. SculptorRon Cheruka , who goes by the nickname "the egg man," also works in the medium of eggshell, but he is not quite as talented in my opinion, a Salieri to Assante's Mozart.
posted by jonson on Mar 4, 2007 - 17 comments

Eye-popping modern reliquaries

The Trigger Finger of Santo Guerro, The Skull Fragment of Heilige Krieg, Reliquary for the Extended Family, A Piece of the True Gun and more modern reliquaries by sculptor Al Farrow. [via Eye of the Goof, whose Mr. Bali Hai is also responsible for this previous introduction to the concept]
posted by mediareport on Mar 4, 2007 - 10 comments

It's just a web page with some really amazing content.

"Another useful analogy might be with a clearing in the jungle. The web is certainly a jungle, and without a few clearings it is hard to see how the innocent can stay sane in there, and it might soon be hard to see anything at all." The words of poet and essayist Clive James, whose eponymous site is an online galley/anthology of breathtaking writing, art, and video interviews. My favorites include Ophelia Redpath's paintings titled after Shakespeare quotes, Laura Noble's photos of rusty things, and, of course, a collection James's outstanding poetry.
posted by eustacescrubb on Mar 3, 2007 - 8 comments

A new meaning to rainbow gradient.

Jen Stark creates sculptures from construction paper.
posted by solistrato on Feb 27, 2007 - 31 comments

The hyper-real sculpture of Ron Mueck

Day late and a dollar short filter: We all just missed a great show at the Brooklyn Museum, namely the hyper-realistic works by sculptor Ron Mueck. Mueck specializes in life-like castings of people in non-life-sized dimensions ranging from the huge to the very small. (Some links NSFW) (More inside)
posted by grapefruitmoon on Feb 6, 2007 - 40 comments

all dolled up

Surreal Barbie and Ken jewelry art by Margaux Lange. Previously (but her work and site have evolved since then). While in China, voodoo dolls have been banned and immediately became a jewelry/accessory craze.
posted by nickyskye on Feb 6, 2007 - 20 comments

Destruction as creation.

"Georgia Russell is a Scottish artist who uses a scalpel instead of a brush or a pen. She works with obsessive perserverance to create constructions that transform found ephemera, such as books, music scores, maps, newspapers, currency and photographs." Samples here. {via design dna}
posted by dobbs on Jan 16, 2007 - 18 comments


[HOW IS POOP MAKE?] :: The long way from food to poop is one of many pieces in the gallery of artist Carlo Giovani. A true multi-media artist, his work runs from digital art (like this incredible series of pieces on 70s films done as pinball machines) to infographics (such as the poop one linked above) to stop motion work (like this quicktime commercial for Brazillian potato chips), and even sculptures (from clothing, lego & even food) but the highlights for me are the papercraft figures & dioramas. warning - the site will try to hijack your browser window, albeit mildly; if this is unacceptable, consider yourself warned & skip the link.
posted by jonson on Jan 12, 2007 - 29 comments

Brass and bone sculptures of Jessica Joslin

Brass and bone sculptures of Jessica Joslin. From the FAQ: "Are they real bones? Some are, some aren't. I will continue to make it as difficult as possible to tell the difference..." Flickr set. [Bumped up a bit from this comment]
posted by mediareport on Dec 28, 2006 - 10 comments

Get The Lead Out

Pencil art isn't always about drawing. The first artist also uses nails. [previously]
posted by Partial Law on Dec 10, 2006 - 15 comments

Crayons as Art

Pete Goldlust creates crayon art, but it's not quite what you might be thinking. He also does playful wall installations, odd prints and other whimsical yet monstrous things.
posted by jacquilynne on Dec 5, 2006 - 7 comments


If you work at Langley and you need a break from actual intelligence gathering, you can always try to crack the code to the sculpture right outside the cafeteria window. Kryptos is a sculpture by James Sanborn located on the CIA grounds which contains a four-part coded message: sections 1-3 have been solved (with Sanborn admitting he made a typo in section 2). Perhaps you'd like to join Elonka (and the hive mind) in having a go at section 4.
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane on Dec 3, 2006 - 14 comments

rock of ages

Chris Booth Sculpture: "Booth always creates his sculptures for specific sites. They are inspired by and honour each site’s local history, mythology and cultures and require intensive research, and consultation with local indigenous people. Usually gigantic in proportion, these phenomenal sculptures are amazing feats of engineering and balance ..." (via Ursi's Blog)
posted by madamjujujive on Nov 26, 2006 - 17 comments

Eric Gill

Eric Gill was a print-maker, sculptor, typographer and thinker [pdf]. An artist whose life has had quite a bit of drama associated with it. There is even a new society dedicated to parsing the impacts of his legacy.
posted by sciurus on Nov 14, 2006 - 18 comments

newly translated interview with prominent WW II German Sculptor

The Monumental is My Sickness: a newly translated 1979 interview with German sculptor Arno Breker. Extremely revealing about art, memory, Nazism, and the troubling life story of "Hitler's Favourite Sculptor". For context, read this critical review of a recent exhibition of Breker's work. More Arno Breker resources, including many photos: (in French); the museum of Arno Breker (in German); Wikipedia entry. via
posted by Rumple on Nov 6, 2006 - 5 comments

Clockwork tiger.

Clockwork steampunk rideable tiger. (via YouTube.) Flickr photos here. Artist's site here.
posted by loquacious on Oct 21, 2006 - 23 comments

American Dream

Rob Fisher's combination of computer technology and art was a pioneering fusion in sculpture. His work has been exhibited all over the world. He died last week of sudden cardiac death.
posted by Dantien on Sep 26, 2006 - 9 comments

3D Starmaps.

Planning a jump to Barnard's Star? Making the Kessel Run in 11 parsecs? You'll need maps. Also available in a solid state format from Bathsheba Sculpture. (Previously)
posted by loquacious on Sep 16, 2006 - 11 comments

Exquisite anatomy: the art of medical models

Historical anatomy models were a marriage of art and science. From about the 13th to the 19th centuries, exquisite wax models were the state of the art. Florence's La Specola anatomical wax museum houses the works of master artists, such as Ercole Lelli, Anna Morandi, and Clemente Susini. The later years of wax models tended towards the grotesque: moulage and depictions of pathological conditions and physical anomalies. Due to the labor required and delicacy of wax models, papier-mâché became the favored production method in the 19th century, partly due to the ability to dissect the models. Over time, models became more stylized to protect the delicate sensibilities of the public. Today, models are again shocking the public with extreme realism.
posted by madamjujujive on Aug 30, 2006 - 18 comments


Peter Callesen - Lately I have been working almost only with white paper in different objects, paper cut, installations and performances.
posted by bob sarabia on Aug 4, 2006 - 12 comments

Friday eye candy

John Powers, artist. Simple, uncluttered site showing his sculptures, drawings and installations. Some more info here.
posted by swordfishtrombones on Jul 7, 2006 - 5 comments


On the heels of microscopic jewelry rides golden buckyballs (full text).
posted by Mr. Six on Jun 1, 2006 - 11 comments

Len Lye: stuff that moves and makes noises

Len Lye: New Zealander Len Lye was a restless maverick - a pioneer of films without cameras (drawing directly onto the celluloid) and kinetic art (CD available through Atoll, sound samples here and here), and he was also quite handy with poems and inks. More about his Windwand and recently installed Waterwhirler on Flickr. Coralised open directory of short Waterwhirler movies here.
posted by nylon on May 30, 2006 - 7 comments

More than Just Origami

Although paper sculptures have been discussed on the Blue before, you might also want to check out Calvin Nicholls (click on the gallery or portfolio links), who was profiled in the latest issue of Somerset Studio magazine. Here's another guy who creates people sculptures out of paper. There are many other artists out there who make sculptures from paper. Museums sometimes have exhibitions of their work. Check them out in person if you get a chance. Some of the sculptures are unbelievable.
posted by cass on May 30, 2006 - 3 comments

Discarded technology artfully redeployed into gadget visionistic notions of independence.

Mat Bevel Company is a gizmotronic fanfare of spunk, funk and kinetic junk. [lots of small embedded qt movies]
posted by carsonb on May 5, 2006 - 10 comments


The penis project. (NSFW) An art project by Sue Long. "At Long's house, penises are everywhere. Cluttering the bedroom floor, standing erect on bookshelves, sticking out of potted plants, sprinkled throughout her back yard. Everywhere you turn, a penis is staring at you." (via oink)
posted by madamjujujive on Apr 13, 2006 - 67 comments


Airigami, the art of folding air in specially prepared latex containers includes the flying octopus, giant soccer players, and many others. [via growabrain]
posted by Armitage Shanks on Apr 12, 2006 - 10 comments

Prepare for the home-made invasion!

Robots, rockets, and rayguns, oh my!
posted by Robot Johnny on Apr 7, 2006 - 11 comments

Sugar babies

Sugar babies made of marzipan.
posted by crunchland on Apr 3, 2006 - 33 comments

The Birth of Sean Preston

"First Pro-Life Monument to Birth" (NSFW) featuring a nude Britney Spears giving birth on a bear-skin rug.
posted by rottytooth on Mar 24, 2006 - 100 comments

What do they do with those plastic horses?

The exciting world of model horses.
posted by zonkout on Mar 10, 2006 - 14 comments

Art for a Sunday

Two completely dissimilar yet nifty artists: The twisted ink drawings of Jon Kuta (big enough to make desktops; Flash interface), and the fabulously lifelike driftwood and bronze sculptures of Heather Jansch (she really likes horses. Warning: you'll have to side-scroll).
posted by Gator on Jan 15, 2006 - 11 comments

"remember me boys while I'm gone"

Take a back-road south of Palmyra, Tennessee, and you'll stumble across the remains of E. T. Wickham's concrete statues, worn by time and broken by vandals. Since being documented online by chroniclers of outsider art, they've found a new set of admirers. A 2001 photography exhibit showed off their former glory; family members now hope to preserve what's left. To learn something of their creator, read the personal tribute by Wickham's grandson.
posted by holgate on Dec 29, 2005 - 4 comments

Ballerina's feet

Work from Esao Andrews [some NSFW] Includes photography, painting, drawing, sculpture and more. All presented in a quite elegant, uncluttered interface.
posted by tellurian on Dec 15, 2005 - 14 comments

Ron Mueck: sculptor at large

Big Man is the final sculpture in a current exhibit on Melancholy - Genius and Insanity in the Western World at the Grand Palais in Paris. Hyper-realist Ron Mueck creates imposing figures by playing with large and small scale. (warning: art nudity)
posted by madamjujujive on Nov 27, 2005 - 18 comments

it's frighteningly boooooootiful

Gallery of funeral art. On this halloween weekend, a brief collection of photographs of tombstone carvings & other cemetary decorations.
posted by jonson on Oct 29, 2005 - 6 comments

Octacube Sculpture

Octacube Sculpture The stainless-steel Octacube is a striking object of visual art and also a mental portal to the fourth dimension, a teaching tool, and a research object bringing together many branches of mathematics and physics connected to the structure of symmetry.
posted by thecollegefear on Oct 25, 2005 - 27 comments


ArtsConversations, the archives of the C/IAF's Netropolitan Museum.
Browse works of art, sculpture, photography (some NSFW) , and more. [via->via->via chunky bacon]
posted by woj on Oct 13, 2005 - 1 comment

Found-objects will controll the universe!

A beautiful collection of Robots built out of junk. Imagine if all those things you see everyday that make you think "that sort of looks like a face, right?" stood up on two (or three) feet. ------- [note: I promise, this is in no way a self-link. I only discovered this website last night while egotisticallly googling my own name. No relation!]
posted by JBennett on Oct 12, 2005 - 22 comments

see it while it lasts

The Spirit Wrestler Gallery in Vancouver has an extensive online gallery featuring Artist Biographies and inspiration for many of the pieces. It focuses on First Nations art, sculpture, and jewelry from the Inuit, Northwest Coast nations, Canadian Plains nations, and the Maori. Some of these communities have a new lease on life due to the income from this market, while others are dying out and skills are being forgotten. Some favourites: Dog Team: Jobie Crow from Umiujaq, Summer Solstice: Pitaloosie Saila from Cape Dorset, Raven Releasing Salmon Transformation Mask: Tom Hunt of the Kwak-waka'wakw. (scroll sideways)
posted by heatherann on Sep 16, 2005 - 6 comments

What kind of a sculpture would Metafilter represent?

Bathsheba Grossman: a geometric sculptor
posted by Gyan on Aug 26, 2005 - 11 comments

Heed! Pants! Muuuve!

Terrifying noggins created over a 15 year period by Joseph Seigenthaler.
posted by jonson on Aug 20, 2005 - 14 comments

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