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Targeting Toddler Terrorists

Targeting Toddler Terrorists "There, at midnight, is a 30-pound, 36-inch-tall peanut with his arms and legs spread, wand searching his body, one security agent removing his shoes to check for explosives and another rummaging through his Scooby-Doo backpack."
posted by waffleboy on Feb 26, 2002 - 42 comments

How to hack grey matter

How to hack grey matter A big security loophole with grey matter powered sites is out there. It lets anyone have the username and password to these sites. Luckly there is a fix for it which can be found here.
posted by thebwit on Feb 23, 2002 - 20 comments

U.S. Tightening Rules on Keeping Scientific Secrets [NYTimes free subscription required]

U.S. Tightening Rules on Keeping Scientific Secrets [NYTimes free subscription required] "One White House proposal is to eliminate the sections of articles that give experimental details researchers from other laboratories would need to replicate the claimed results, helping to prove their validity " It's a new monkey to keep See, Hear, and Speak no evil company: Publish no scientifically replicable evil.
posted by srboisvert on Feb 17, 2002 - 7 comments

SafeWeb not so safe?

SafeWeb not so safe? It was pitched as a "web anonymizer." It was supposedly even "CIA proof." Now some holes have been found.
posted by yesster on Feb 12, 2002 - 13 comments

Attempted hijack of United Airlines flight to Argentina...

Attempted hijack of United Airlines flight to Argentina...
A passenger was seized by cabin crew today as he attempted to enter the cockpit on an American Airlines flight from the US to Argentina today...
I don't think this is anything al-Quaida related, but I thought it was worth the post.
posted by tomcosgrave on Feb 7, 2002 - 12 comments

Oppose a National ID card

Oppose a National ID card, this article tells the many reasons and abuses of freedom that will take place.
posted by Budge on Feb 6, 2002 - 32 comments

Privacy of MP3 fans at risk

Privacy of MP3 fans at risk A new security hole has been discovered in one of the world's most popular file-swapping programs Morpheus which could allow anyone to gain private information about its millions of users.
posted by arnab on Feb 4, 2002 - 12 comments

AOL has been actively blocking Trillian users.

AOL has been actively blocking Trillian users. If you switched over to Trillian and use AIM you've had problems connecting all week. As of this morning, version 0.721 is working but will likely be blocked again. AOL is claiming it as a "security" issue.
posted by tommasz on Jan 31, 2002 - 30 comments

Trillian Users blocked from AIM service?

Trillian Users blocked from AIM service? The bit about this that scares me is the solution to the problem involves disabling the Secure IM functions. Is this a technical glitch or a conspiracy by AOL to reserve the ability to spy on our IM chats? Or build intentional security loopholes?
posted by Jeffy on Jan 29, 2002 - 29 comments

Exploding Silicon

Exploding Silicon Laptop thieves beware! We can now make your ill-gotten loot explode on command...
posted by Irontom on Jan 17, 2002 - 8 comments

Microsoft to make products more "trustworthy."

Microsoft to make products more "trustworthy." A lot of buzz words floating around here, like "trustworthy" and "security." Does this mark a true sea change in Microsoft strategy, or is it just a PR stunt, too little, too late? One thing I'll say, though - I never thought I'd hear this coming from Bill: "Users should be in control of how their data is used... It should be easy for users to specify appropriate use of their information, including controlling the use of e-mail they send." (from the AP report)
posted by topolino on Jan 17, 2002 - 14 comments

"Err...hello...is that Alex Braganza? Sorry to disturb you ...

"Err...hello...is that Alex Braganza? Sorry to disturb you ... my name is Kenny Patterson. No you don't know me. But I took my computer into PC World for repair and when I got it back they'd replaced my faulty hard disk with a reconditioned one which used to be your old machine. Thing is, they hadn't actually bothered to format the thing so now I've got all your personal details. Yes that right -- that's were I got your phone number." I imagine that's how the conversation would have started ...
posted by feelinglistless on Jan 11, 2002 - 18 comments

Hackers: Computer Outlaws

Hackers: Computer Outlaws A TLC show(that I'm 3/4 through) that seems to actually use reliable sources to discuss not just cracker behavior, but also the creative side of hackers, pointing out the developments attributed to some hackers. Now Markoff and Mitnick. Not a bad little show....
posted by dglynn on Jan 9, 2002 - 7 comments

On the Public's Right to Know

On the Public's Right to Know or another reason why I hate John Ashcroft.
posted by zedzebedia on Jan 8, 2002 - 25 comments

A Congressman gets debriefed.

A Congressman gets debriefed. In other news, lawmakers finally reap what they sow.
posted by insomnyuk on Jan 8, 2002 - 17 comments

For Paranoid Parents everywhere. A global satellite positioning wristwatch, in happy-happy day-glo colours, that you can security-clamp onto your kid's wrist. Then, at your office terminal, you can find out exactlywhere they are. Love the 911 button. How about actually playing with your kids, rather than launching them out into the urban wilderness, on a wireless tether? "Latch-key" takes on a whole new dimension.
posted by theplayethic on Jan 8, 2002 - 28 comments

Killer Paid Online Data Broker for Material Obtained Through Trickery

Killer Paid Online Data Broker for Material Obtained Through Trickery A stalker who eventually murdered his victim acquired her home address via a company named Docusearch. However, Docusearch didn't get it via database mining, but through a process they call "pretexting" (aka "human engineering" or "pretending to be someone else"). Docusearch, on the stalkers behalf, called the victim's business associates posing as an insurance rep or some such, and tricked the colleagues into giving over the victim's address. Legal? Perfectly legal. Ethical? Maybe. It's a tried and true investigative technique employed by private investigators for decades. It reminds us once again that the human dufus at the next desk over is the biggest security risk. However, this is an issue of an investigative firm exercising a typical, long-standing investigative practice for a purpose that, unfortunately, turned nefarious. Given that, why did the Post put the online data broker spin on the article?
posted by monkey-mind on Jan 4, 2002 - 20 comments

The Solution?...Fly Naked

The Solution?...Fly Naked
So you can sneak a bomb in your shoe. The only solution is to fly naked. You can't bring anything on board; it all has to be shipped separately on cargo jet. There has to be an air marshall on every flight -- no in plain clothes (because nobody's in clothes) but sitting in front of the cockpit, heavily armed and ready. It's getting that ridiculous. What can we do?
posted by riley370 on Dec 28, 2001 - 23 comments

It's That Pesky Skin Color Thing Again.

It's That Pesky Skin Color Thing Again. An Arab-American member of President Bush's security detail was denied passage on an American Airlines flight from Baltimore to Dallas Tuesday evening... "They didn't see an American, they didn't see a law enforcement professional. All they saw was a racial and ethnic profile that they didn't want on their flight." -- NY Times site.
posted by fold_and_mutilate on Dec 27, 2001 - 41 comments

When do the war powers expire? (LA Times)

When do the war powers expire? (LA Times) With a state of War being used to justify increased security measures, spending bills, unlimited detention and international military action is anybody else uncomfortable with the vagueness of the 'current situation'? How and when can we say we have won and declare it peacetime again?
posted by srboisvert on Dec 23, 2001 - 10 comments

FBI warns Microsoft XP users

FBI warns Microsoft XP users "The FBI is urging computer users to unplug and don't play when it comes to addressing serious security flaws found in Microsoft's new Windows XP program." "Microsoft admitted this week that there are several serious glitches in the new software. " Really?
posted by headlemur on Dec 22, 2001 - 24 comments

Microsoft's newest version of Windows....

Microsoft's newest version of Windows.... billed as the most secure ever, contains several serious flaws that allow hackers to steal or destroy a victim's data files across the Internet or implant rogue computer software. The company released a free fix Thursday.

A Microsoft official acknowledged that the risk to consumers was unprecedented because the glitches allow hackers to seize control of all Windows XP operating system software without requiring a computer user to do anything except connect to the Internet.
posted by bkdelong on Dec 20, 2001 - 60 comments

"MS releases mother of all IE security patches"

"MS releases mother of all IE security patches" Per the article: Microsoft has released a cumulative patch for Internet Explorer which the firm says is a "critical" security precaution against crackers which should be applied "immediately". Time to update/upgrade boys and girls. :)
posted by crankydoodle on Dec 14, 2001 - 11 comments

New travel package

New travel package minimizes the amount of time it takes for you to get from the airport to the beach. Now you can get off the plane, and start swimming and sunbathing in no time! Isn't this amazing?
posted by yevge on Dec 12, 2001 - 9 comments

Antivirus Firms Say They Won't Create FBI Loophole.

Antivirus Firms Say They Won't Create FBI Loophole. A free knuckle sandwich to the first person to say, "looks like magic lantern has been extinguised!"
posted by mcsweetie on Dec 10, 2001 - 11 comments

Been to a USGS site today?

Been to a USGS site today? What about your favorite national park site? Probably not, since all are part of the U.S. Department of the Interior, whose external network connections have been severed due to electronic security concerns raised by the court in the case Cobell v. Norton (formerly Cobell v. Babbitt).

With no external email or access to the Internet could you do your job? How dependent is your workplace on electronic information access? (Since all their websites are down, I have no direct link to post. A copy of the memo was sent to the members by the admin of a USGS email distribution list.)
posted by carobe on Dec 7, 2001 - 16 comments

Never has there been a better incentive

Never has there been a better incentive to become a flight attendant. Remeber, you can't spell 'airport security' without T-O-D-A-Y-I-G-O-T-G-R-O-P-E-D-B-Y-A-H-O-R-N-Y-R-E-D-N-E-C-K.
posted by saladin on Dec 2, 2001 - 3 comments

Hackers: a report on the Internet's vulnerabilities

Hackers: a report on the Internet's vulnerabilities Anyone see the original broadcast of this PBS "Front Line" special? Any good? It airs again Nov. 29, 2001.
posted by fleener on Nov 29, 2001 - 11 comments

AirSnort.

AirSnort. The dangerous app with the unlikely name allows users to snatch data being passed over wireless networks, eventually capturing passwords to the network.
posted by o2b on Nov 29, 2001 - 7 comments

In lieu of the Magic Lantern thread, Symantec will be ignoring the FBI trojan. [taken from ./]
posted by hobbes on Nov 28, 2001 - 22 comments

For all your middle east rumor mill needs

For all your middle east rumor mill needs Just another alternative media, highly speculative source for rumors... blah, blah, blah Quite a few of their "stories" have been confirmed as of late. Maybe it's worth another look for those of you who have never been.
posted by yangwar on Nov 21, 2001 - 7 comments

This is fascism.

This is fascism.
posted by magullo on Nov 16, 2001 - 86 comments

Dark Address Space

Dark Address Space leaves some 100 million hosts completely unreachable from portions of the Internet.
posted by trioperative on Nov 15, 2001 - 2 comments

Nuclear Emergency Search Team (NEST)

Nuclear Emergency Search Team (NEST) We know about the US "elite" special ops - Delta Forces, Navy Seals, CDC (I would argue) - but had you heard of NEST, located inside a small, unobtrusive box under "Dept of Energy, Emergency Response" in the New York Times Office of Homeland Security Org Chart (reg required), "....The primary task of NEST is constantly to be on the lookout for potential nuclear or radiological weapons that might be smuggled onto the U.S. ....After the Sept. 11 attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, NEST was put on a state of high alert and operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week in the nation's capital and New York City monitoring for nuclear-related weapons... includes extensive use of deployed sensors and specially equipped vehicles patrolling the streets of both cities..." I can't decide if I feel safer or more paranoid thinking the windowless minivan parked for the last hour outside my window is sniffing for a nuke.
posted by Voyageman on Nov 6, 2001 - 12 comments

How, exactly, did this happen?

How, exactly, did this happen? I'll tell you how. I happened to be at O' Hare yesterday, and the security drones there were about as dumb as a bag of wet mice (more in comments).
posted by vraxoin on Nov 5, 2001 - 46 comments

Drastic changes due for America after terror attacks

Drastic changes due for America after terror attacks We are to become a garrison state, for better or worse, with the CIA more intimately involved with internal (domestic) doings and the FBI taking on new duties.
posted by Postroad on Nov 4, 2001 - 20 comments

Bush will observe "high alert" at...the World Series?

Bush will observe "high alert" at...the World Series? Confirmed at the NY Times. Is this sort of mixed signal supposed to make us feel better about our safety? At least "officials disclosed that Vice President Dick Cheney [has] been taken to an undisclosed secure location." Let's review: we're on high alert; the President is going to a sporting event; the Vice-President is safe. Tom Toles got it right.
posted by precipice on Oct 30, 2001 - 28 comments

Surprise! National Review thinks the market

Surprise! National Review thinks the market can provide for better airport security. Talk about ignoring evidence...
posted by Ty Webb on Oct 30, 2001 - 34 comments

Who needs boxcutters, when you can just pack a gun

Who needs boxcutters, when you can just pack a gun In the midst of so-called heightend security, a man accidentally brings a loaded gun onto a plane undetected. I know Southwest doesn't have meals, but do they not have metal detectors either? from Amy Langfield's always entertaining blog.
posted by tsarfan on Oct 25, 2001 - 24 comments

Young Philadelphia man refused access to UA flight because of his reading material...

Young Philadelphia man refused access to UA flight because of his reading material... This story just made my blood boil. Of all the stupid things... Ack! I just can't type straight! I don't have all the information... there's going to be another side to this... but if this is anywhere _near_ accurate, I hope some heads roll.

[via Evhead, via Dan Gillmor]
posted by silusGROK on Oct 19, 2001 - 65 comments


Ashcroft issues new policy on FOIA requests

Ashcroft issues new policy on FOIA requests that rescinds a 1993 policy that made it somewhat harder for federal agencies to refuse requests for public records. No surprise, especially given the current situation, but the interesting part is the rationale: Ashcroft cites national security, the effectiveness of law enforcement and protecting sensitive business information. "I encourage your agency to carefully consider the protection of all such values and interests when making disclosure determinations under the FOIA." (via Politechbot)
posted by thescoop on Oct 18, 2001 - 5 comments

Hillary tries to run a security check point

Hillary tries to run a security check point if John Q Public were to attempt this, what do you think would happen?
posted by DBAPaul on Oct 15, 2001 - 27 comments

Two men remove utility knives from their carry-on bags and throw them away before boarding a flight.

Two men remove utility knives from their carry-on bags and throw them away before boarding a flight. They were seen and reported, and subsequently arrested at the security checkpoint. One has been charged with improper use of a weapon. I'm hoping there's more to this story that we're not being told, otherwise it sounds plainly wrong to me. Yeah, they were dumb to have them, but there are reasons people use these knives and even travel with them.
posted by Qubit on Oct 15, 2001 - 20 comments

Passenger removed from plane, stripped, and washed.

Passenger removed from plane, stripped, and washed. Further loss of rights??? Knee jerk reaction??? How much must we give up in the name of security???
posted by DBAPaul on Oct 14, 2001 - 31 comments

Internet II

Internet II a series of articles from Forbes ASAP on such things as the coming broadband revolution through private/public consortiums, security and reliability improvements, Washington sclerosis and various other interesting miscellania. (and an update on Michael Milken!) Reminds me of the heyday of Wired :)
posted by kliuless on Oct 13, 2001 - 0 comments

The Australian Rugby League cancelled the Australian Kangaroos rugby league team's tour of the UK after a small number of players were concered about their security. Now there's a major outcry from all over Australia and the UK regarding the cancellation, and they are being branded gutless, wimps, and cowards from both home and abroad. Great Britain hasn't beaten Australia in a rugby league test series in over 30 years, now there's talk it should be given to them by default. Quite pathetic of the ARL considering that the Australian Wallabies rugby union team (note to Americans - rugby league and rugby union are two different sports) have no doubts that their tour to Europe will go on as planned.
posted by Jase_B on Oct 11, 2001 - 10 comments

Debate over brain scans

Debate over brain scans Over at the Register, one of their writers has gotten into a fantastic pissing contest with InfoSeek's founder over the issue of brain scans and airport security. What are your thoughts?
posted by xochi on Oct 10, 2001 - 7 comments

OK, this is yesterday's news, but this airline incident happened Monday over the skies of Chicago. I heard the sonic boom as the F-16's scrambled to intercept the plane, which at first gave me a false sense of security. But now I'm wondering about 2 things about this incident; First, how the hell did this guy get in the cockpit? Haven't they fixed the doors yet (at least with a deadbolt)? Secondly, if this plane was indeed a threat, what would the F-16's do? Shoot the plane down over a very populated area? It seems our new airline security plans still have some major holes!
posted by Sal Amander on Oct 9, 2001 - 16 comments

'Electric Phrenology' as a security device.

'Electric Phrenology' as a security device. One of Infoseek's founders wants to sell the world's airports on a mind-reading scheme. Worse, a Pentagon think-tank is taking advice from Jeff "Skunk" Baxter, ex-lead guitarist from the Doobie brothers. His advice: psychological warfare with drugs, music, and nanomachines that make you love America. [towards bottom]
posted by skallas on Oct 4, 2001 - 5 comments

Next attack by containership?

Next attack by containership? The head of security at Logan Airport, responsible not only for security lapses that led to 2 of the 9/11 hijackings but hundreds of other lapses as well, has been removed from his post--and reassigned as the head of security at the Port of Boston. Mass. politics at its finest.
posted by espada on Oct 3, 2001 - 4 comments

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