662 posts tagged with security.
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Drastic changes due for America after terror attacks

Drastic changes due for America after terror attacks We are to become a garrison state, for better or worse, with the CIA more intimately involved with internal (domestic) doings and the FBI taking on new duties.
posted by Postroad on Nov 4, 2001 - 20 comments

Bush will observe "high alert" at...the World Series?

Bush will observe "high alert" at...the World Series? Confirmed at the NY Times. Is this sort of mixed signal supposed to make us feel better about our safety? At least "officials disclosed that Vice President Dick Cheney [has] been taken to an undisclosed secure location." Let's review: we're on high alert; the President is going to a sporting event; the Vice-President is safe. Tom Toles got it right.
posted by precipice on Oct 30, 2001 - 28 comments

Surprise! National Review thinks the market

Surprise! National Review thinks the market can provide for better airport security. Talk about ignoring evidence...
posted by Ty Webb on Oct 30, 2001 - 34 comments

Who needs boxcutters, when you can just pack a gun

Who needs boxcutters, when you can just pack a gun In the midst of so-called heightend security, a man accidentally brings a loaded gun onto a plane undetected. I know Southwest doesn't have meals, but do they not have metal detectors either? from Amy Langfield's always entertaining blog.
posted by tsarfan on Oct 25, 2001 - 24 comments

Young Philadelphia man refused access to UA flight because of his reading material...

Young Philadelphia man refused access to UA flight because of his reading material... This story just made my blood boil. Of all the stupid things... Ack! I just can't type straight! I don't have all the information... there's going to be another side to this... but if this is anywhere _near_ accurate, I hope some heads roll.

[via Evhead, via Dan Gillmor]
posted by silusGROK on Oct 19, 2001 - 65 comments


Ashcroft issues new policy on FOIA requests

Ashcroft issues new policy on FOIA requests that rescinds a 1993 policy that made it somewhat harder for federal agencies to refuse requests for public records. No surprise, especially given the current situation, but the interesting part is the rationale: Ashcroft cites national security, the effectiveness of law enforcement and protecting sensitive business information. "I encourage your agency to carefully consider the protection of all such values and interests when making disclosure determinations under the FOIA." (via Politechbot)
posted by thescoop on Oct 18, 2001 - 5 comments

Hillary tries to run a security check point

Hillary tries to run a security check point if John Q Public were to attempt this, what do you think would happen?
posted by DBAPaul on Oct 15, 2001 - 27 comments

Two men remove utility knives from their carry-on bags and throw them away before boarding a flight.

Two men remove utility knives from their carry-on bags and throw them away before boarding a flight. They were seen and reported, and subsequently arrested at the security checkpoint. One has been charged with improper use of a weapon. I'm hoping there's more to this story that we're not being told, otherwise it sounds plainly wrong to me. Yeah, they were dumb to have them, but there are reasons people use these knives and even travel with them.
posted by Qubit on Oct 15, 2001 - 20 comments

Passenger removed from plane, stripped, and washed.

Passenger removed from plane, stripped, and washed. Further loss of rights??? Knee jerk reaction??? How much must we give up in the name of security???
posted by DBAPaul on Oct 14, 2001 - 31 comments

Internet II

Internet II a series of articles from Forbes ASAP on such things as the coming broadband revolution through private/public consortiums, security and reliability improvements, Washington sclerosis and various other interesting miscellania. (and an update on Michael Milken!) Reminds me of the heyday of Wired :)
posted by kliuless on Oct 13, 2001 - 0 comments

The Australian Rugby League cancelled the Australian Kangaroos rugby league team's tour of the UK after a small number of players were concered about their security. Now there's a major outcry from all over Australia and the UK regarding the cancellation, and they are being branded gutless, wimps, and cowards from both home and abroad. Great Britain hasn't beaten Australia in a rugby league test series in over 30 years, now there's talk it should be given to them by default. Quite pathetic of the ARL considering that the Australian Wallabies rugby union team (note to Americans - rugby league and rugby union are two different sports) have no doubts that their tour to Europe will go on as planned.
posted by Jase_B on Oct 11, 2001 - 10 comments

Debate over brain scans

Debate over brain scans Over at the Register, one of their writers has gotten into a fantastic pissing contest with InfoSeek's founder over the issue of brain scans and airport security. What are your thoughts?
posted by xochi on Oct 10, 2001 - 7 comments

OK, this is yesterday's news, but this airline incident happened Monday over the skies of Chicago. I heard the sonic boom as the F-16's scrambled to intercept the plane, which at first gave me a false sense of security. But now I'm wondering about 2 things about this incident; First, how the hell did this guy get in the cockpit? Haven't they fixed the doors yet (at least with a deadbolt)? Secondly, if this plane was indeed a threat, what would the F-16's do? Shoot the plane down over a very populated area? It seems our new airline security plans still have some major holes!
posted by Sal Amander on Oct 9, 2001 - 16 comments

'Electric Phrenology' as a security device.

'Electric Phrenology' as a security device. One of Infoseek's founders wants to sell the world's airports on a mind-reading scheme. Worse, a Pentagon think-tank is taking advice from Jeff "Skunk" Baxter, ex-lead guitarist from the Doobie brothers. His advice: psychological warfare with drugs, music, and nanomachines that make you love America. [towards bottom]
posted by skallas on Oct 4, 2001 - 5 comments

Next attack by containership?

Next attack by containership? The head of security at Logan Airport, responsible not only for security lapses that led to 2 of the 9/11 hijackings but hundreds of other lapses as well, has been removed from his post--and reassigned as the head of security at the Port of Boston. Mass. politics at its finest.
posted by espada on Oct 3, 2001 - 4 comments

The Twenty Most Critical Internet Security Vulnerabilities

The Twenty Most Critical Internet Security Vulnerabilities
This is a list of Internet security tips that SAMS and the FBI updated yesterday. The list is really aimed at IT professionals and does not offer much advice to the home user. My advise for any home user who is worried about viruses and security: 1. Don't use Windows OS, any Windows OS (try Linux or Mac) 2. Remove Outlook from your computer. 3. Don't open e-mail attachments you did not ask for.
posted by DragonBoy on Oct 2, 2001 - 10 comments

Um...you might want to reconsider that American Airlines flight...

Um...you might want to reconsider that American Airlines flight... The Federal Aviation Administration has given American Airlines special permission to allow passengers to board its flights before the airline determines whether they are on the FBI's watch list, according to an FAA security directive obtained by USA TODAY.
posted by tpoh.org on Sep 27, 2001 - 6 comments

Silicon Valley backs Senate bill

Silicon Valley backs Senate bill that would allow companies to report computer network attacks to the government without having to worry about the public finding out. The reasoning: it would encourage more companies to report the problems and help the government track down the culprits. A similar bill is in the House.
posted by thescoop on Sep 25, 2001 - 3 comments

Are the airlines pulling a Chrystler?

Are the airlines pulling a Chrystler? "The President and Congress agree the airlines should get $5 billion in cash grants right away -- more than Federal spending this year on worker training, or food and nutrition assistance programs. Help with new security spending boosts the down payment on a rescue to $8 billion. This is close to the combined market value of American, United, Delta, US Airways, Northwest, America West, and Continental."
posted by theMargin on Sep 25, 2001 - 26 comments

Gartner's opinion proliferates

Gartner's opinion proliferates into the mainstream Internet news sources. any further thoughts?
posted by tatochip on Sep 25, 2001 - 10 comments

Gartner Group

Gartner Group recommends that IIS users look elsewhere for a better web server.
posted by vowe on Sep 21, 2001 - 8 comments

Now is probably a poor time to start making bomb jokes at the airport.
posted by BoatMeme on Sep 20, 2001 - 10 comments

Way of life ending for NASCAR fans

Way of life ending for NASCAR fans as coolers banned from racetracks. Is this an example of increased security or overt paranoia? "Right now you don't know who you can trust, you don't know who the guy sitting next to you is and you don't know if his cooler could be a bomb."
posted by mb01 on Sep 19, 2001 - 32 comments

New worm doing the rounds.

New worm doing the rounds. Great.
posted by nico on Sep 18, 2001 - 23 comments

These personal computer security tips

These personal computer security tips could prove very useful to anyone looking to secure their data.
posted by phunkone on Sep 18, 2001 - 2 comments

The Rocket Man

The Rocket Man says: "I know I wouldn't get on an American airline unless it had an armed guard." Despite everything, I think it's going to be a long long time before that happens---could airlines really afford that?
posted by adrober on Sep 15, 2001 - 24 comments

bin Laden has a mentor?
posted by redhead on Sep 14, 2001 - 5 comments

Meehan, Neal raise doubts on leadership of president

Meehan, Neal raise doubts on leadership of president - ``I don't buy the notion Air Force One was a target,'' said Meehan. ``That's just PR. That's just spin.''

Meehan office number... (202) 225-3411
posted by revbrian on Sep 14, 2001 - 74 comments

This is a list of airports currently meeting FAA security standards.

This is a list of airports currently meeting FAA security standards. Possibly of some benefit to those needing to use air travel for business, to reunite with loved ones, etc. I discovered this link while visiting Flightview, which has been down most of the day, presumably due to traffic. Flightview is a flight tracking system which runs on standard PCs.
posted by bargle on Sep 13, 2001 - 1 comment

World wide "lock-down" of major parts of major cities.

World wide "lock-down" of major parts of major cities. The Malaysian government has detained without trial several Islamic extremists, checkpoints were set up outside the Citibank Tower and Asian-Pacific Financial Tower in Hong Kong, the CN Tower in Toronto was shut, Downing Street was evacuated because a suspect package had been found inside No 10. (The alert was called off within minutes.) Etc, etc, etc.
posted by krisjohn on Sep 12, 2001 - 2 comments

Fear of flying?

Fear of flying? New security measures are being discussed. Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta says, "These terrorist acts are designed to steal the confidence of Americans. We will restore that confidence."
posted by prozaction on Sep 12, 2001 - 9 comments

Knives with blades shorter than five centimetres would normally be allowed onto an aircraft

Knives with blades shorter than five centimetres would normally be allowed onto an aircraft, according to Mal Dunn "who headed the aviation security division of the [Australian] Civil Aviation Safety Authority. 'I'm not convinced that this was necessarily caused by lax security. My experience is that US airports are usually very diligent,' he said. 'The principle of people carrying knives is pretty clear and internationally recognised. The criteria are associated with the length of the knife; anything over two inches [five centimetres] long is considered dangerous and is usually taken off the individual." I was dumbfounded to hear these planes had been hijacked with knives, but reading the preceding still chills me. Perhaps, the time has arrived to rethink these measures as they appear to be so ignorant in hindsight.
posted by mischief on Sep 12, 2001 - 45 comments

Anti-rip CD system bypassed.

Anti-rip CD system bypassed. heh. nice try, boyos. i've never understood how people can believe something digitized can possibly be protected in such a manner as to be foolproof. what one process can scramble, another can undo. [via /.]
posted by fuzzygeek on Aug 1, 2001 - 5 comments

Code Red.

Code Red. Microsoft NT, 2000, and ISS users beware, and resurgance of the code red virus may rear it head again tomorrow. Be sure to get all patched up
posted by Hackworth on Jul 30, 2001 - 12 comments

"There might be consumer expectations here, but there is no legal right."

"There might be consumer expectations here, but there is no legal right." For the last several months, music consumers around the world have unwittingly been buying CDs that include technology designed to discourage them from making copies on their PCs. The technology inserts audible clicks and pops into music files that are copied from a CD onto a PC. According to Macrovision, the company that has provided the technology to several major music labels. (I want to say "Fuck the music industry," but that would be rude.)
posted by tranquileye on Jul 20, 2001 - 48 comments

Seeing weird things in your website logs today? This will explain it... Running IIS and haven't patched it in over a month? Go here. 13,000 servers have already been affected.
posted by machaus on Jul 19, 2001 - 37 comments

A Russian security expert has been arrested for showing how easy it is to crack an e-book.

A Russian security expert has been arrested for showing how easy it is to crack an e-book. All hail the DMCA! Some information is just Too Dangerous to be Revealed! (See also wildly detailed coverage, including the affidavit, from Planet eBook.)
posted by davidchess on Jul 18, 2001 - 6 comments

Win XP's Product Activation as a breeze to hack. Provided that RC1 still ships as is and you keep your RAM locked at a fixed number of sticks, it's simply a matter of keeping a backup of a DBL file. For all the ballyhoo, it's amazing that something this obvious slipped under the cracks. With WPA this sloppy, is this the only half-hearted facet of Windows XP?
posted by ed on Jul 17, 2001 - 36 comments

European Parliament says Echelon exists

European Parliament says Echelon exists and is more or less powerless to stop it. All the more reason for government and industry to create encryption standards.
posted by skallas on Jul 4, 2001 - 6 comments

Not embedded in your hand, just your credit card.

Not embedded in your hand, just your credit card. Your Providian VISA with Smart Chip Technology comes with a smart chip that's embedded on the front of the credit card. Soon, a smart chip will let you store information and applications that make shopping easier and more secure. Anyone here a little leary of this kind of "smart"ness? Thoughts?
posted by thunder on Jul 3, 2001 - 23 comments

Bugnosis

Bugnosis A web bug detector to find out who's using single-pixel GIFs to relay information to third parties. Distributed by the folks at the Privacy Foundation.

I've long wanted to have this information without mucking through the HTML source. Now that it's available, I don't know if I really want to know.
posted by idiolect on Jun 12, 2001 - 16 comments

Law enforcement and intelligence agencies now have access to software that can remotely record every keystroke and see every file on a target PC.

Law enforcement and intelligence agencies now have access to software that can remotely record every keystroke and see every file on a target PC. Data Interception by Remote Transmission (D.I.R.T.), developed by Codex Data Systems (you need a username and password to get past the opening screen) can supposedly see through PGP, firewalls, whatever you throw at it apparently. Only works against Win95 so far, but that won't last. Is this hogwash or something crucial?
posted by aflakete on Jun 4, 2001 - 15 comments

Attrition: Evolution.

Attrition: Evolution. Attrition.org has decided to cease updating their archive of Web defacement mirrors. The reasons being the total lack of appreciation on some part as well as the shear volume of mirrors per day, and the fact that it sucked up what little personal lives the staff already had. Fear not, however, statistics and commentary will still be around - just based on the Alldas mirror and stay tuned for the rebirth of their more informative sections like Errata and Security.
posted by bkdelong on May 21, 2001 - 0 comments

Security Threat! But only if your server's running...

Security Threat! But only if your server's running... No crap. I love the Note on Microsoft's security bulletin for it's recent IIS 5.0 security flaw. Did anyone need to be told that?
posted by mecawilson on May 4, 2001 - 4 comments

Those British boys at it again.

Those British boys at it again. It was like this during the war, y'know. I remember my old mate Alan Turing beating the system in much the same way. Saved the world he did. Tally-ho.
posted by feelinglistless on Apr 24, 2001 - 7 comments

You too can be a felon!

You too can be a felon! Last year, the SDMI Foundation made a public challenge to see if anyone could crack 6 proposed protection mechanisms for digitally-encoded music. All six turned out to be feeble and all six fell. Since then, the SDMI Foundation has been relying on lawyers to cover up for the incompetence of their engineers. They're trying to suppress this article, so everyone reading this has a duty to make and store a copy of it. (Everyone should also own at least one copy of DeCSS. I have the 442-character C version printed on the back of my personal card.)
posted by Steven Den Beste on Apr 21, 2001 - 15 comments

Bush to frisk toddlers at annual White House Easter Egg Roll.

Bush to frisk toddlers at annual White House Easter Egg Roll. High school massacres aside, isn't this going too far? I doubt that a 2 year old could fire off several rounds on an AK-47, much less load one. Even balloons are banned becaue they'll be mistaken for gunfire.
posted by ed on Apr 15, 2001 - 17 comments

MSIE leaves the door wide open on your Windows OS...

MSIE leaves the door wide open on your Windows OS... I can't believe that the myriad "security holes" are coincidental... maybe we should call them back doors. I mean, really... who do they think they're kidding? We all know who really wants surreptitious access to our systems. [via Glish]
posted by silusGROK on Apr 3, 2001 - 5 comments

FAA=The Keystone Cops?

FAA=The Keystone Cops? What kind of legal fallout can we expect from this? Considering the kind of wealth onboard the doomed flight, how much of us little'uns safety is considered on a general basis? I went to the airport the other day to pick up my dad, and unlike the other times where I'm asked to "change the display" on my phone and my cigarette pack is opened, they now lazily let me pass. Is there really any FAA supervison? We all have stories. Anyone care to share? Links, theories, conspiracy theories, stories. Please tell.
posted by crasspastor on Apr 2, 2001 - 4 comments

Your phone is you

Your phone is you Before we let cellphones handle everything from opening our medical records to buying a house, we'll need to make sure people can't steal our identities.
posted by semmi on Mar 28, 2001 - 5 comments

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