661 posts tagged with security.
Displaying 51 through 100 of 661. Subscribe:

‘PRISM: The SIGAD Used *Most* in NSA Reports!’

How would you, as a junior analyst in S2C41, the branch of the Signals Intelligence Directorate, navigate the millions of records logged daily, in order to find the nugget to get you noticed? “EVILOLIVE, MADCAPOCELOT, ORANGECRUSH, COBALTFALCON, DARKTHUNDER: the names are beguiling. But they don’t always tell us much, which is their reason for existing: covernames aren’t classified, and many of them – including the names of the NSA’s main databases for intercepted communications data, MAINWAY, MARINA, PINWALE and NUCLEON – have been seen in public before, in job ads and resumés posted online.” Daniel Soar sorts through the possibilities in the London Review of Books, 24 Oct 2013. (See also William Arkin's blog on codenames) [more inside]
posted by zbsachs on Nov 4, 2013 - 33 comments

Aviator

Aviator, a web browser from WhiteHat Security. [more inside]
posted by chunking express on Oct 30, 2013 - 53 comments

Ransomware & Rogues Galore

Youtube user rogueamp dedicates his channel to discussing fraudulent antivirus software, AKA "rogues" and "ransomware". (MLYT)
posted by Evernix on Oct 26, 2013 - 7 comments

LinkedIn offer to man-in-the-middle all your email, for free!

LinkedIn offer to man-in-the-middle all of your email, for free! LinkedIn Intro is a new service by LinkedIn, adding inline data to all your iOS emails. "But how can they read my emails?!" you ask: you use the best encryption money can buy! Well, you just need to install one little security certificate... after all, how much of a a bad idea can it be? LinkedIn are well-known for their good security practices!
posted by katrielalex on Oct 25, 2013 - 69 comments

Edit by 04882 joel backdoor

Some D-Link routers have a simple back door in their firmware.
posted by curious nu on Oct 13, 2013 - 61 comments

"Everyone being held was a US citizen."

But that didn't prevent On the Media producer Sarah Abdurrahman and several members of her family and friends from being detained at a Canadian-US border while on the way home from a wedding. The story is all the more frightening as it details Sarah's inability to get any answers about policy from the Border Patrol, including the name of the officers who held her.
posted by Eyeveex on Sep 23, 2013 - 92 comments

All Your ***** Belong To Us

Google knows almost every wi-fi password. Of course this means that the NSA also has access to them. Apple might not be much better.
posted by blue shadows on Sep 16, 2013 - 97 comments

NSA may have secretly made major mathematics breakthrough

If the NSA is able to break through banks' computer security, does that mean it solved the prime factorization problem? The New York Times reported recently that “the agency has circumvented or cracked much of the encryption, or digital scrambling, that guards global commerce and banking systems.” Since banks' encryption codes rely on the fact that nobody knows how to find the prime factors of really large numbers, it could mean that the NSA has found a way to do that. Or it could mean that the NSA has simply gotten lots of banks to give up their information, or found other ways around their encryption. But if they've cracked this long-standing math problem, might the secret leak? What would be the effects?
posted by Sleeper on Sep 12, 2013 - 60 comments

Showdown at the Airport Body Scanner

"As I watch fellow passengers walk into the machines, posing with their arms raised over their heads like prison inmates submitting to a strip search, I feel proud of my small act of protest. Then I spread my legs and await my public groping."
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Sep 3, 2013 - 136 comments

Cookieless Monster

Cookieless Monster: Exploring the Ecosystem of Web-based Device Fingerprinting [pdf]. From the 2013 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, this article examines "how web-based device fingerprinting currently works on the Internet. By analyzing the code of three popular browser-fingerprinting code providers, we reveal the techniques that allow websites to track users without the need of client-side identifiers [i.e. cookies]." [more inside]
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Aug 28, 2013 - 33 comments

"...I assumed that this was another such check."

Don't fly during Ramadan. Aditya Mukerjee describes his experience while attempting to clear the U.S. Transportation Security Administration's checks and board a JetBlue flight. After being cleared by the TSA, following two hours of questioning and checks, Mukerjee was prevented by JetBlue from boarding his intended flight. He was offered rebooking for the following day and, when he declined, given a refund.

This isn't the first time that the TSA and JetBlue have been called out for this type of action.
posted by fireoyster on Aug 22, 2013 - 149 comments

Perhaps they could call it WOPR

To reduce the risk of future Edward Snowden style leaks, the NSA wants to reduce the number of people in the loop. Director Keith Alexander told Reuters that the NSA plans to eliminate fully 90 percent of its system administrators and replace them with machines.
posted by Naberius on Aug 9, 2013 - 104 comments

Possible FBI infiltration of TOR

In a crackdown that FBI claims to be about hunting down pedophiles, half of the onion sites in the TOR network has been compromised, including the e-mail counterpart of TOR deep web, TORmail. FreedomWeb, an Irish company known for providing hosting for Tor "hidden services" -- services reached over the Tor anonymized/encrypted network -- has shut down after its owner, Eric Eoin Marques, was arrested over allegations that he had facilitated the spread of child pornography. [more inside]
posted by whyareyouatriangle on Aug 4, 2013 - 126 comments

Snowden walks free in Russia

Russia grants Snowden asylum ; US government goes apeshit. [more inside]
posted by allkindsoftime on Aug 1, 2013 - 295 comments

Hacker Barnaby Jack, dead at 35

Barnaby Jack, a hacker and security researcher previously known for his hacks involving ATMs and insulin pumps, has died in San Francisco. He was 35. His death came just days before he was to give a presentation about techniques for hacking implanted heart devices, which could kill a person from 30 feet away.
posted by anemone of the state on Jul 28, 2013 - 27 comments

The price of security

PreCheck, a new program instituted by the TSA, will allow passengers to keep their shoes, jackets and belts during screening, as well as allow laptop computers and approved liquids to remain in bags for a fee of $85.
posted by Omon Ra on Jul 25, 2013 - 216 comments

Banana Wisconsin

Bulletproof Security is a paramilitary security company. They have provided security to Habitat for Humanity and Empire CAT among others. [more inside]
posted by Pogo_Fuzzybutt on Jul 8, 2013 - 42 comments

Grenades, Bayonets, and Tasers. Oh My!

The TSA has started an Instagram page showing confiscated items from TSA checkpoints in airports around the country.
posted by reenum on Jul 3, 2013 - 36 comments

ILOVEYOU & other trips down viral memory lane

Relive techno fears of yore ... malware aficionado Daniel White collects vintage computer viruses, infects his machines and records the results. See more examples at his YouTube channel.
posted by madamjujujive on Jun 30, 2013 - 22 comments

Why Fear Always Wins

Imagine two politicians: One preaches fear and excessive "security," while the other says terrorism is a negligible risk. They hold, like me, that risk is part of life, and that while some security is necessary, we should mostly just refuse to be terrorized and get on with our lives. Fast-forward 10 years. If I'm right and there have been no more terrorist attacks, the preacher of fear takes credit for keeping us safe. But if a terrorist attack has occurred, my government career is over.
posted by blankdawn on Jun 28, 2013 - 40 comments

Facebook fixed a "shadow profile" leak, but don't quite say what leaked

Going back to at least 2011, it was believed that Facebook kept "shadow profiles" of users and non-users, accumulating information when users synchronize mobile phones, import personal data from e-mail providers, import personal information from instant messaging services, send invitations to friends or make search queries for other people on Facebook. In early 2012, four members of the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations demanded answers from Facebook (PDF) and were told that non-users didn't have "shadow profiles", but the contents of the reply were not made public. Just this past Friday, Facebook released an "Important Message" on a data leak they closed, in which information from members' "shadow profiles" could be obtained. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 23, 2013 - 27 comments

Yahoo is releasing inactive Yahoo IDs

Yahoo, on June 12, announced that it is releasing inactive IDs. Yahoo says they are "committed and confident," while others think it is a "spectacularly bad idea" and a "dirty trick."
posted by TrolleyOffTheTracks on Jun 19, 2013 - 83 comments

And the home of the

The NFL announced a change to its bag policy Thursday and beginning with the 2013 season, only clear plastic, vinyl or PVC bags will be permitted inside NFL stadiums. [more inside]
posted by whyareyouatriangle on Jun 16, 2013 - 121 comments

Being the nerd that I am, I was itching to crunch some badass numbers

Debarghya Das, an Indian student at Cornell, wanted to impress his friends by obtaining their examination marks for the Indian Certificate of Secondary Examination and the Indian School Certificate and, thanks to some poorly written javascript, discovers the entire database containing the grades for 200,000 Indian students, as well as potential evidence of widespread tampering.
posted by elgilito on Jun 7, 2013 - 36 comments

Inside joke! Obscure meme reference!

The Pew Internet And American Life Project has a new report out on Teens, Social Media, and Privacy. danah boyd comments:
My favorite finding of Pew’s is that 58% of teens cloak their messages either through inside jokes or other obscure references, with more older teens (62%) engaging in this practice than younger teens (46%).
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 5, 2013 - 51 comments

Beyond brute force.

Anatomy of a hack: How crackers ransack passwords like “qeadzcwrsfxv1331” Hackers get %90 of an MD5 password database using multiple analysis techniques including Markov chains, mask, combinator and hybrid attacks. These attacks combine dictionaries of previously-recovered passwords and passphrases with brute force and statistical analysis to expand the power of password cracking.
posted by CBrachyrhynchos on May 28, 2013 - 153 comments

Just continue with the poker face, men

Use These Secret NSA Google Search Tips to Become Your Own Spy Agency
posted by infini on May 8, 2013 - 17 comments

A Thought on Web Security

I long for the future where I can safely assume my passwords are stolen.
posted by stoneweaver on Apr 29, 2013 - 20 comments

Dances with llamas

In southern Sweden, scene of recent sheep-killing incidents perpetrated by wolves, llamas are being introduced to see if they will kick wolf-butt and protect the sheep. In the US, the guard llama is becoming a more common "first line of defense" on ranches. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Apr 23, 2013 - 64 comments

Lock your bike

Have you been looking for bike locks that work? Will only the best locks do? Perhaps you just need a secondary lock?
posted by overleaf on Apr 23, 2013 - 40 comments

"what kind of surveillance society we should be fighting for"

Practical Ethics: Enlightened Surveillance?
Surrendering on surveillance might be the least bad option – of all likely civil liberty encroachments, this seemed the less damaging and hardest to resist. But that’s an overly defensive way of phrasing it – if ubiquitous surveillance and lack of privacy are the trends of the future, we shouldn’t just begrudgingly accept them, but demand that society gets the most possible out of them.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Apr 18, 2013 - 23 comments

The World Has No Room for Cowards

It’s not often that one has the opportunity to be the target of a cyber and kinetic attack at the same time. But that is exactly what’s happened to me and my Web site over the past 24 hours. On Thursday afternoon, my site was the target of a fairly massive denial of service attack. That attack was punctuated by a visit from a heavily armed local police unit that was tricked into responding to a 911 call spoofed to look like it came from my home. Well, as one gamer enthusiast who follows me on Twitter remarked, I guess I’ve now “unlocked that level.” ~ KrebsonSecurity
posted by infini on Mar 16, 2013 - 56 comments

the ultimate in spyware

Meet the men who spy on women through their webcams - "If you are unlucky enough to have your computer infected with a RAT, prepare to be sold or traded to the kind of person who enters forums to ask, "Can I get some slaves for my rat please? I got 2 bucks lol I will give it to you :b" At that point, the indignities you will suffer—and the horrific website images you may see—will be limited only by the imagination of that most terrifying person: a 14-year-old boy with an unsupervised Internet connection."
posted by madamjujujive on Mar 10, 2013 - 172 comments

TSA troubles

Delta Airlines and other airline workers' unions have asked the TSA to reconsider their recent announcement to loosen security restrictions on airlines, effective April 25, that would allow passengers to carry small pocket knives, among other items. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Mar 9, 2013 - 202 comments

Dreaming of password combinations sucks

Password Cracking AES-256 DMGs and Epic Self-Pwnage
posted by unliteral on Feb 12, 2013 - 42 comments

Retweet to add additional diamonds to your shopping basket

Twitter is experimenting with online shopping: "American Express card holders who connect their card numbers to their Twitter accounts can post on Twitter to trigger a purchase of select products, including discounted American Express gift cards, Kindle Fire tablets from Amazon.com Inc. and jewelry from designer Donna Karan. The program will roll out over the next few days." [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Feb 12, 2013 - 65 comments

Shhhhhhh …..

Silent Circle, a security start-up led by PGP creator Phil Zimmermann and two ex-Navy SEALs, has been teasing technology that purports to make mobile communications "virtually invulnerable to surveillance efforts" for a few months (previously). Now, they're pushing a "groundbreaking encrypted data transfer app that will enable people to send files securely from a smartphone or tablet at the touch of a button." The company has pledged not to comply with law enforcement surveillance requests, nor to provide backdoor access for the FBI.
posted by jbickers on Feb 5, 2013 - 49 comments

Ruby off the Rails

What The Rails Security Issue Means For Your Startup summarizes the impact of recent arbitrary-code-execution security vulnerabilities in Ruby on Rails: "What Do We Do When Apocalyptically Bad Things Happen On Our Framework of Choice?"
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Feb 1, 2013 - 94 comments

Mark Zuckerberg's Hoodie

It is June 2, 2010 and Mark Zuckerberg is sweating. He’s wearing his hoodie—he’s always wearing his hoodie—and he’s on stage and either the lights or the questions are too hot. … “Do you want to take off the hoodie?” asks Kara Swisher.
“I never take off the hoodie.”
The varied cultural resonances of an unassuming garment.
posted by the mad poster! on Jan 29, 2013 - 157 comments

Freedom from....

The New York Times asks seven 'experts': Does makeup ultimately damage a woman’s self-esteem, or elevate it? [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jan 16, 2013 - 260 comments

But not browsing MetaFilter

(BBC) A security check on a US company has reportedly revealed one of its staff was outsourcing his work to China. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Jan 16, 2013 - 86 comments

NSF/smashthestate

Password Security in Deus Ex
posted by Zarkonnen on Jan 5, 2013 - 61 comments

It's the end of the world and they know it

The most-watched show in the history of the National Geographic Channel isn't Wild, Taboo or even the longest-running documentary series on cable tv: Explorer. It's Doomsday Preppers, a show that documents the "lives of otherwise ordinary Americans" as they prepare for the end of the world. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 21, 2012 - 115 comments

Look Out—He’s Got a Phone!

Security experts agree that it’s only a matter of time before smartphones become the smart person’s murder weapon of choice.
posted by stoneweaver on Dec 20, 2012 - 56 comments

256 bit security and the laws of physics

Why 256 bit keys are long enough. A nice graphic explanation by Schneier why brute-force attacks against 256-bit keys will be infeasible until computers are built from something other than matter and occupy something other than space. [more inside]
posted by Twang on Dec 17, 2012 - 34 comments

You’re not anonymous

Sumit Suman recently visited a site, did not sign up for anything, did not connect via social media, but got a personal email from the site the next day. Here’s how they did it.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Dec 12, 2012 - 52 comments

Slap the flower decal on the internet detective van

The Mystery of the Phantom Likes. Bernard Meisler at Read Write Web is trying to find out why his dead friends are liking stuff on Facebook. [more inside]
posted by Diablevert on Dec 11, 2012 - 63 comments

Nothing to hide?

Why Privacy Matters, Even If You Have Nothing To Hide, by Daniel J. Solove
The nothing-to-hide argument pervades discussions about privacy. The data-security expert Bruce Schneier calls it the "most common retort against privacy advocates." ... To evaluate the nothing-to-hide argument, we should begin by looking at how its adherents understand privacy. Nearly every law or policy involving privacy depends upon a particular understanding of what privacy is. The way problems are conceived has a tremendous impact on the legal and policy solutions used to solve them.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 9, 2012 - 67 comments

Green Dam Youth Escort

"During his civil lawsuit against the People's Republic of China, Brian Milburn says he never once saw one of the country's lawyers. He read no court documents from China's attorneys because they filed none. The voluminous case record at the U.S. District courthouse in Santa Ana contains a single communication from China: a curt letter to the U.S. State Department, urging that the suit be dismissed. That doesn't mean Milburn's adversary had no contact with him." [China Mafia-Style Hack Attack Drives California Firm to Brink]
posted by vidur on Nov 28, 2012 - 12 comments

Tazreen factory fire

At least 112 workers died in Tazreen garments factory fire in Bangladesh. The reasons of the fire are the subject of investigation, but the firefighters put the blame for the tragedy on the lack of fire exits. Since 2006, over 500 garment factory workers died in Bangladesh fires caused often by poor safety standards and shoddy electrical installations. The garments made in the Tazreen factory were sold by C&A, among others. Clothing makes up 80 percent of the country's $24 billion in annual exports.
Last year saw the 100th anniversary of another such tragedy.
posted by hat_eater on Nov 25, 2012 - 31 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 14