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28 posts tagged with serial.
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Deputizing the Hive Mind

In Serial withdrawal? Well, perhaps you can help the Toronto police out. Inspired by the success of the Serial podcast, Toronto police are tweeting out clues in the unsolved murder of Mike Pimentel.
posted by Mrs. Rattery on Dec 18, 2014 - 23 comments

anxieties about lurid voyeurism, unwholesome interest: In Cold Blood

"Much has been said about the storytelling techniques of 'Serial,' which comes out in weekly installments even as the show’s host, Sarah Koenig, reinvestigates the conviction of a Baltimore-area teenager for the murder of his ex-girlfriend. The serialized approach teases its audience with cliffhangers, prompts its listeners to construct their own theories and invites outsiders to glimpse the tricky winnowing process of reporting. But 'Serial' also testifies to how much the criminal justice system itself is founded on storytelling." (Laura Miller, Salon: The new "In Cold Blood" revisionism: Why it doesn't matter if Capote’s classic wasn't fully true) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 8, 2014 - 31 comments

Serial: the Podcast 2: Electric Innocence Project Boogaloo

Just as the previous thread closes, Sarah Koenig talks to Innocence Project leader Deirdre Enright. What Enright said and did in Episode 7 may turn around the whole way listeners have been thinking about the case. Koenig may still be trying to keep "all her balls in the air" as Enright puts it, until her own investigation is over (and her opinion close to her chest), but Adnan seems to have already won some important supporters.
posted by rikschell on Nov 6, 2014 - 168 comments

FTDI driver destroys devices

USB-to-serial chip manufacturer FTDI has deployed a new version of their Windows device driver, with a small bug: it doesn't work with many Arduinos and is damaging devices that used to work. Turns out that it isn't a bug -- FTDI's new driver is deliberately "bricking" devices if it thinks the chip is counterfeit (which is fairly easy to see). FTDI says it is in the license agreement and claims that they are "definitely not targeting end users", despite the fact that their actions are destroying end-user devices where the purchasers had no idea about the provence of the chips inside. Various communities respond and some question if the new driver is malware.
posted by autopilot on Oct 22, 2014 - 145 comments

Serial: the podcast

The folks at This American Life are behind a new podcast called Serial. The premise behind Serial is that one story will told over 10-20 episodes, which together will constitute a "season." The first two episodes of season 1 have just been released: over the course of the next few months, creator Sarah Koenig will attempt to unravel the mystery of the 1999 murder of Baltimore high school student Hae Min Lee.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates on Oct 4, 2014 - 94 comments

The Unsolved Murders of Jeff Davis Parish

Who Killed the Jeff Davis 8? A serial killer has allegedly been preying on Louisiana prostitutes. But a new investigation reveals a far scarier theory.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates on Feb 4, 2014 - 39 comments

Superego & Thrilling Adventure Hour present "The War Of Two Worlds"

Superego (previously) and The Thrilling Adventure Hour present A War of Two Worlds, a multi-part, crossover, podcast event spectacular. Written by Ben Acker and Ben Blacker and improvised by Superego, The WorkJuicePlayers, and special guests. Written and improvised? Yes! [NSFW] [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 28, 2013 - 2 comments

The epic journey....

As part of this weekend's Guardian series: 50 years of Doctor Who, six of the actors who have played The Doctor's companions - Louise Jameson, Freema Agyeman, Katy Manning, Carole Ann Ford, Billie Piper and Karen Gillan discuss their experiences on the show in video interviews. (Links to print interviews within.) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Sep 28, 2013 - 26 comments

Live Retro Sci-Fi Radio Comic Book Stage Show

"In a genre of its own—Live-Action Graphic Novel—The Intergalactic Nemesis saga is a hilarious, uplifting adventure of heroes-by-circumstance overcoming impossible odds. But the telling is what makes the experience of The Intergalactic Nemesis so incredibly unique: while three actors, one Foley artist, and one keyboardist perform all the voices, sound effects and music, more than 1,250 hand-drawn, full-color, hi-res, blow-your-mind comic-book images blast from the screen, all performed live." [more inside]
posted by TheSecretDecoderRing on Jul 22, 2012 - 9 comments

And Guest Starring: Cameraman and Fly

One of the side effects of being a 5-day, live show was that the Gothic soap opera Dark Shadows featured regular technical and acting flubs. Many, many, many flubs [more inside]
posted by The Whelk on May 19, 2012 - 25 comments

Bushman Lives

Read the latest Daniel Pinkwater novel before it's published. As he has done with his last three novels , children's author, NPR commentator and pet lover Daniel Pinkwater is serialising his latest novel, Bushman Lives. [more inside]
posted by cottoncandybeard on Sep 19, 2011 - 28 comments

Before Doctor Who, there was Professor Quartermass

British manned space flights; an insidious threat from outer space; a man mutating into an evil alien, his human consciousness being eaten away; and a scientist - utterly anti-Establishment, courageous and cerebral - the only man who can fight it. No, not Doctor Who, but his highly distinguished predecessor, Prof Bernard Quatermass. A decade before Doctor Who first aired, the The Quartermass Experiment was the first science-fiction TV serial produced for adults, and a live-to-viewers BBC production, to boot. The show ran for six episodes in 1953, of which only the first two episodes are known survive. The short sci-fi series spun off three original sequels and a radio drama-documentary, along with movie re-makes of the first three series by Hammer Films. BBC brought back live TV with a 2005 adaptation of the original 1953 series. You can watch the various series on online (in parts on Daily Motion), thanks to fans of The British Rocket Group. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 23, 2011 - 21 comments

Rocket Man: Up and at them!

King of the Rocket Men was the first appearance of the "atomic powered rocket flying suit" from Republic Pictures. The characters changed but the suit remained for four action-packed serials. In 1949, King of the Rocket Men starts out with a bang, or rather a series of bangs (YT playlist), as scientists die in accidents, but science and fists save the day. Civilian researcher Commando Cody is the next hero to don the rocket pack in 1952, for 12 chapters of Radar Men from the Moon. But when Zombies of the Stratosphere attack that same year, Commando Cody is out sick (or something), so Larry Martin steps up to duke it out in the rocket suit (though thin on the "zombies", the serial starred Leonard Nemoy as a Martian). Commando Cody returned in 1953 to face the evil alien "Ruler" in Commando Cody: Sky Marshal of the Universe (vid 1, vid 2). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 14, 2011 - 17 comments

"It usually sounds ridiculous when opponents to video game describe them as murder simulators..."

"Serial Killer Roguelike" is exactly what it sounds like. Here's a video of it in action. [more inside]
posted by codacorolla on Aug 26, 2010 - 46 comments

4 8 15 16 23 42

Here, There Be Spoilers: As "L O S T" Ends, Creators Explain How They Did It, What’s Going On. (Previously on MeFi)
posted by zarq on Apr 26, 2010 - 226 comments

Sailor Twain.

Sailor Twain, Or, The Mermaid In the Hudson is a serialized graphic novel with new installments every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Mar 2, 2010 - 2 comments

300 baud of awesome in a wooden box

This is what 300 baud looks like online today.
posted by loquacious on Jun 1, 2009 - 111 comments

Date with a Devil

My date with Willy Pickton. Robert Pickton that is, Canada's most prolific serial killer.
posted by GuyZero on Apr 13, 2009 - 30 comments

The Hole in the Wall on Top Shelf!

The Hole in the Wall [via mefi projects] is our own interrobang's surrealistic cat story now being serialized at Top Shelf Comics as part of their new Webcomics section, and it's definitely something special - pen & ink & watercolor adventures of two cats exploring a mysterious and dangerous underground landscape. More comics like this will be posted there depending on the popularity of this one, so if you love art, great comics, or cats, you will want to check it out. This was a part of interrobang's Year in Comics project, so if you fall in love with the Hole in the Wall kittehs (you will!), go have look at his other stuff, as well.
posted by taz on May 23, 2008 - 30 comments

Gravityland

Gravityland. Interactive Web TV series. Watch weekly episodes, respond, contribute. Read blog. Add moves to music video. Play Where in the world is Gravityland? Read comic book. Build FAQ. Somehow, it's all related, and all possibility. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Mar 5, 2008 - 8 comments

Well, our flight was just fine up until that guy started his lame singing. That's not JAZZ!

Zeppelin vs. Pterodactyls (1936), with cameos by Bela Lugosi, John Wayne & Terrence Stamp. This is a Hammer Film.
posted by miss lynnster on Aug 11, 2007 - 16 comments

New Pinkwater Novel, Serialized

Daniel Pinkwater's newest novel, "The Neddiad"—serialized weekly for your reading pleasure. (Previous Pinkwater Post)
posted by interrobang on Jul 18, 2006 - 18 comments

This is a Love Story

A Canadian Love Story Your husband is a serial rapist. You are a veterinary clinic worker who wants to give him something special for Christmas. How about giving your younger sister as a rape toy? [more inside]
posted by RockCorpse on May 27, 2005 - 87 comments

The Serial Killer Who Hugged Me

Life and Death: an extraordinary post from Chris Clarke about his connection to serial killer Stephen Peter Morin. His family chimes in meaningfully in the comments. Morin's execution is often pointed to as proof of the cruelty of lethal injection.
posted by Cassford on Apr 4, 2005 - 20 comments

Hotel

Hotel. More Twin Peaks than General Hospital.
posted by dodgygeezer on Feb 24, 2005 - 8 comments

Devil in the White City

I've just finished reading a copy of Larson's Devil in the White City sent to me by a relative who heard of my love for Isaac's Storm. Devil is a biography of two men who were central to the 1893 Chicago World's Fair. One, Daniel H. Burnham would become one of the most influential architects and city planners of the early 20th century. Burnham organized a crew of the architectural, engineering and artistic elite including landscape artist Frederick Law Olmstead (famous for Central Park and Biltmore) in an effort to better the Paris world's fair of 1889. The Chicago exposition would be profoundly influential for American culture introducing Arabic Dance (the tune for "There's a place in France/where the naked ladies dance" was created in Chicago), the Ferris Wheel, Shredded Wheat, and helping to settle the Battle of the Currents between Edison and Tesla. The fair drew a large variety of larger than life figures including Archduke Ferdinand, Elizabeth B. Anthony, Buffalo Bill Cody and the mostly forgotten master of self promotion Citizen Train.

Devil is also a biography of the man given credit for America's first recognized serial murders, the self-named H. H. Holmes. At the start of the fair, Holmes changed his modus operandi from marrying and killing women as part of insurance and real estate scams, to running a hotel from which an unknown number of his female tenants never checked out. Although information on Holmes's activities is scanty, he serves as a mirror of the utopia of civic safety created by Burnham. Larson makes the argument that the contrasts between optimisim and pessimism, well-intentioned virtue and depravity, urban utopia with a few blocks from slums, would set the tone for the 20th century.
posted by KirkJobSluder on Aug 7, 2004 - 13 comments

Dora Dare, Blake Somerset, Olive, Exor....

Daring Planet --retrofuturistic online space serial (most of it to come, but a teaser, and tons of clickable cool), by Paul Corrigan.
posted by amberglow on Mar 19, 2004 - 7 comments

Microsoft unsympathetic

Microsoft unsympathetic toward ending serial killings. "Spokane County Sheriff Mark Sterk held an extraordinary public meeting two months ago and asked the public for fresh tips. He even wrote to Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, asking him to donate software to help analyze 10 years of homicide files; according to a sheriff's spokesman, Microsoft said no." => Lack of confidence in their software, or lack of a value system for MS?
posted by greyscale on Apr 23, 2000 - 5 comments

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