Join 3,495 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

74 posts tagged with slang. (View popular tags)
Displaying 1 through 50 of 74. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (35)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)


Users that often use this tag:
madamjujujive (3)
Kattullus (2)
xmutex (2)
vacapinta (2)
srboisvert (2)
netbros (2)

Well I'll Go To The Foot Of Our Stairs

British subtitles
posted by The Whelk on Aug 20, 2014 - 21 comments

The Evolution of Slang

For a century and a half, The New York Times has been earnestly—and hilariously—defining the evolving language of cities.
We marveled at the way these expressions—the ones we understood, anyway—captured the spirit of the era in which they were defined. It makes sense, for instance, that the Times defined acid ("a slang term for the drug LSD") in 1970, grunt ("a slang word for an infantryman") during the Vietnam War, diss ("a slang term for a perceived act of disrespect") in 1994, and macking ("a slang term for making out") in 1999.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 19, 2014 - 45 comments

yodelling in the canyon (of love)

Timelines for sexual slang: oral sex and beyond + orgasm, bodily fluids and contraception. Previously.
posted by NoraReed on Aug 7, 2014 - 6 comments

Time magazine explains it all to you.

Yesterday, Time magazine apparently felt it important to inform its readership what the slang term "bae" means. Black Twitter has responded with #timetitles. A few examples:
Let me HOLD SOME MONEY...Asking for a loan from someone who clearly has it with no intentions of paying it back. #TimeTitles
I Can't Even: understanding the Black community's bias for odd numbers #TimeTitles
"Don't Make Me Come Up There: Is Time-Out Not Working For Your Child?" #TimeTitles
In case you've been wondering, according to Time, "A good rule of thumb for now at least: if you would use the words boo or babe in some circumstance, you can probably use bae." [more inside]
posted by fuse theorem on Jul 24, 2014 - 115 comments

How To Swear Like A Sailor

A Dictionary of Navy Slang Compiled From Various Sources 67 pages of history and hilarity.
posted by timsteil on May 26, 2014 - 35 comments

Legato Gelato = Smooth and Cool

Have some slang you want to insert into the popular consciousness? Rappedian (Comapper?) Zach Sherwin shows you how to do it in his pukka new music video, Legato Gelato.
posted by carsonb on Oct 31, 2013 - 5 comments

Interactive timelines of slang for genitalia

Two timelines with slang for the male and female genitalia, simply titled The Penis and The Vagina. The timelines are made by Jonathon Green, a slang lexicographer (previously on MeFi). [more inside]
posted by bjrn on Aug 16, 2013 - 77 comments

Is this a new conjunction slash what is its function?

Slash: Not Just a Punctuation Mark Anymore - Anne Curzan writes in the Chronicle of Higher Education about a new slang word that she learned from her undergraduate students in a History of English course slash analyzes how it fits with traditional parts of speech.
posted by codacorolla on Apr 25, 2013 - 79 comments

Yo is a Pronoun, yo.

Check out yo down in Baltimore enriching American English.
posted by Mister_A on Mar 12, 2013 - 34 comments

Janey Mac!

Curious about contemporary Dublin slang? C'mere to me and have a look at this YouTube video yoke. It's only massive! [more inside]
posted by DarlingBri on Feb 14, 2013 - 36 comments

Dr. Gross' Criminal Investigation (1906), and Thieves Slang (1962)

Criminal Investigation, a Practical Handbook for Magistrates, Police Officers and Lawyers (1906)
This volume is designed to be a working hand-book for all engaged or interested in Criminal Investigation. It has, by special permission, been translated and adapted from the well-known work of Dr. Hans Gross, Professor of Criminology in the University of Prâg and special lecturer on that subject in the University of Vienna.... Few men are so well fitted, by training and experience, as Dr. Gross to compile a work like the present.... As M. Gardeil, Professor of Criminal Law at Nancy, says, in introducing the French Translation to French Criminalists, Dr. Gross is "an indefatigable observer; a far-seeing psychologist; a magistrate full of ardour to unearth the truth, whether in favour of the accused or against him; a clever craftsman; in turn, draughtsman, photographer, modeller, armourer; having acquired by long experience a profound knowledge of the practices of criminals, robbers, tramps, gipsies, cheats, he opens to us the researches and experiences of many years. His work is no dry or purely technical treatise; it is a living book, because it has been lived."
See also: Slang Expressions Commonly Used By Thieves, from Chapter 8 of the 5th ed. (1962) of Gross's Criminal Investigation.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 13, 2013 - 13 comments

Dancing the Blanket Hornpipe

17 euphemisms for doing it taken from the Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue. And previously on the blue.
posted by Isadorady on Nov 20, 2012 - 38 comments

Claws sharp

The alphaDictionary Historical Dictionary of American Slang presents a unique way for studying slang. It contains over 2200 slang words with the centuries in which they were first printed. The dates were taken from the Oxford English Dictionary, the Online Etymological Dictionary, or the earliest occurrences the editors can remember. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Sep 14, 2012 - 8 comments

Victorian values

Victorian slang - a guide to sexual Victorian terms [NSFW]
posted by Artw on Aug 20, 2012 - 80 comments

EYYyyyWWWww

Sound-Word Index — Emotions and their sound can invade our digital messages. Our words become flexible and vibrate according to the volume of our voices, transforming their written form into an expressive and resonating language. Without the help of body language, words can sometimes fall short in our digital conversations. However, sound, volume and rhythm can influence the spelling of our words, helping to translate our emotions hidden behind our screens.
posted by netbros on Jun 25, 2012 - 1 comment

Yo Lady G, wassup?

The makers of Downton Abbey take great care to recreate the look and feel of the period in which it is set. But occasionally anachronisms in the dialogue slip through.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Feb 13, 2012 - 123 comments

Of Particular Interest to Mefites

A history of "pearl clutching." Apparently, it originated on In Living Color.
posted by mokin on Jan 23, 2012 - 50 comments

Local Twitter Slang, And All That Jawn

The Awl takes a look at how Twitter has allowed local slang to go global, and the unhappiness this causes for some.
posted by reenum on Oct 28, 2011 - 34 comments

What? No Shout at the Devil?

"This week I’d like to start with a little audience participation. (...) Not every sufferer feels constrained to 'decorate the pavement.'" Jonathon Green, author of Green's Dictionary of Slang is Taking Slang Seriously. Also rounded up in The Vomitorium. [more inside]
posted by Devils Rancher on Jun 10, 2011 - 11 comments

Not for old fogies.

“The flapper movement is not a craze, but something that will stay,” the author maintained. “Many of the phrases now employed by members of this order will eventually find a way into common usage and be accepted as good English.” [more inside]
posted by timory on Apr 10, 2011 - 83 comments

The Treachery of Images

A French association for non-smokers' rights has launched a new ad campaign [all links potentially NSFW] that visually equates smoking with oral sex, using the tagline: "To smoke is to be a slave to tobacco." The pictures show adolescents, young men and women, and the act looks submissive, even forced. Uproar ensues. The Minister for Families vows to ban the images. Commentators join in. French slang helps explain: "Faire un pipe" and "Fumer le cigare" are both common-enough terms for the act that most people who see the images would get the double-entendre. [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Feb 24, 2010 - 70 comments

¡Viva México, Cabrones!

As a recent New York Times article notes: "Mexicans, despite their reputation in Latin America for ultrapoliteness and formality, curse like sailors, a recent survey found. They use profanity when speaking with their friends, with their co-workers, with their spouses and even with their bosses and parents."

This then: Effective Swearing in D.F.: Towards a Manual of Communication for English Speakers visiting Mexico City
Because, remember: Hablar español sin caló es de hueva.
posted by vacapinta on Jan 25, 2010 - 49 comments

Shut your bazoo and click, bindlestiff!

Slang in the Great Depression. Less'n you're a dumbcluck, you're gonna open up that bazoo and speak the language taught John Swartzwelder everything he knows. [more inside]
posted by ford and the prefects on Aug 31, 2009 - 20 comments

Antarctica: It's a Cool Place!

Cool Antarctica is a site dedicated to all things Antarctic. There are pictures (penguins), videos (including, among much else, an old documentary about Edmund Hillary's and Vivian Fuchs' Transantarctic Expedition), a history section focusing on the famous explorers (e.g. Amundsen, Scott, Shackleton, Charcot and de Gerlache) and a fact file, which includes what may be my favorite section, an Antarctic slang dictionary (degomble: removing snow that's stuck to clothing before going inside - monk-on: a term for being in a bad, usually introspective mood, "he's got a monk-on" - poppy: alcoholic beverage that is chilled with natural Antarctic ice). All this is but a taster of what's on the website.
posted by Kattullus on Apr 29, 2009 - 20 comments

The Secret Language of Families

Family Words (scroll down, p.9). Do you know what the "Ahh-hee's" are? It describes the feeling you get when you put on a bathing suit that is still damp. What about a "winterpepper?" That would be a backwards flip (opposite of somersault). "Eeksler?" The lever on an ice cube tray, so-called because of the sound it makes. Daw daw, doot-do, to-do to-do, taw taw, der der, drit-drit and hoo-hoo? All refer to the tube of cardboard inside a roll of toilet paper. Featured on NPR's A Way With Words (full episode).
posted by vronsky on Mar 4, 2009 - 76 comments

Cuss all you want, but only around men, horses, and cows

Old Western Slang and Lingo also Insults and the Code of the West
posted by Del Far on Mar 3, 2009 - 32 comments

Stephan Kinsella's rulings on term coolness

Annoying and/or pretentious terms: "jejune", "pyjamas", "piping hot", "social justice". Cool terms: "cogitate", "cul-de-sac", "high dudgeon", "orangutan".
posted by colinmarshall on Oct 17, 2008 - 112 comments

Circus Slang for Gauchos.

Every trade has a history, a culture and secrets, all most vividly expressed in the special terms used by its workers. The circus is, of course, no different as this handy dictionary of circus slang shows. It contains entries for both American and European circuses, and has a handy list of vaudeville slang words as well. These unique words used on the carnival lot around the world demonstrate a language that defines a world of wonders, and now you can use them to impress your friends and insult your enemies!
posted by Effigy2000 on Sep 25, 2008 - 14 comments

Writer, musician, polymath

Stan Kelly-Bootle began his career as a member of the earliest wave of computer programmers, who wrote prolifically about a wide range of computing issues. Back in his home town though, he's probably best known for his contributions to a lexicon of local slang, Lern Yerself Scouse, and for his canonical and not-so-canonical contributions to the British folk repertoire. [more inside]
posted by PeterMcDermott on May 12, 2008 - 9 comments

How to sell wolf tickets.

A guide to prison slang. Texas prison guards' guide to prison slang. Jim Goad's guide to prison slang.(He should know). More prison slang. [more inside]
posted by Bookhouse on Jan 2, 2008 - 22 comments

Reflection's Edge

Reflection's Edge, a monthly fiction zine (back issues), has many resources for writers, including slang/dialect (don't miss the links to Texas Talk, the Internet Guide to Jazz Age Slang, or the 1736 Canting Dictionary), writing advice and interviews, and advice on how to sell your story.
posted by Pants! on Dec 10, 2007 - 10 comments

Vulgar Song and Slang from the 19th Century and earlier

Francis Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue from 1811. Canting Dictionary (thieving slang) from 1736. Three Centuries of Canting Songs and Slang Rhymes (1536–1896). Before you end up scragged, ottomised, and grinning in a glass case, you should learn to sing Frisky Moll's Song... and know what the heck it means:
A famble, a tattle, and two popps,
Had my Boman when he was ta’en;
But had he not bouz’d in the diddle shops,
He’d still been in Drury-Lane.

posted by Kattullus on Jul 1, 2007 - 15 comments

New Dictionary Words: extraordinary rendition or girlfriend experience?

Hundreds of 'new' words in the new edition of the Collins English Dictionary (Reuters story), also via BBC, AP and the Fox Television Stations (headline with no story, surprising since its publisher is another Rupert Murdoch subsidiary... but I digress). Some are obvious: hoodie, wiki, POTUS, plasma screen; some reflect our times: Gitmo, Londonistan, extraordinary rendition, carbon footprint; some are absolutely slangy: celebutante, McMansion, muffin top, man bag, disemvowel, barbecue stopper, girlfriend experience... Also in the book: ho. And not the version Santa Claus says. The new dictionary is available "online, on mobiles, as a desktop application or integrated with Microsoft Word" - when you buy the deadtree edition.
posted by wendell on Jun 4, 2007 - 22 comments

live from the custody suite!

Got Playdar? Have you been seagulled lately? Find some great new words to insert into your work, family and friendly conversation. Have you seen that new bitcom?
posted by parmanparman on Apr 4, 2007 - 23 comments

Charlie Foxtrot.

Embrace the Suck. Intensive military activity creates an incubator for slang. By bringing together people from geographically diverse backgrounds, putting them into stressful circumstances, and teaching them a new language of jargon and acronym, the armed forces create fertile ground for new idioms - many of which return home in civvies when the conflicts are over. In the Civil War, World War I and World War II, in Korea and in Viet Nam, servicepeople created or popularized now-familiar terms like shoddy, hotshot, cooties, tailspin, fleabag, face time, joystick, SNAFU, FUBAR, flaky, gung ho, no sweat, flame-out, and many, many others. Now, the GWOT brings us a new generation of 'milspeak'. Military columnist Austin Bay has published an early collection of neologisms from Gulf War II. On NPR, Bay explains what The Suck is, how to identify a fobbit, and why Marines look down on the attitude of Semper I.
posted by Miko on Mar 31, 2007 - 66 comments

Medical terms, such as "LOLFDGB" - Little Old Lady, Fall Down, Go Boom

Doctor's slang that might be on your chart.
posted by dios on Aug 23, 2006 - 59 comments

The art of the con

Do you know your close-up con games? Some classics: the Tip, the Jamaican Switch, the Wire (and its incredibly complicated cousin, the Rag), the Texas Twist, the Pigeon Drop, the Spanish Prisoner (or Nigerian Scam) and the ancient pig-in-a-poke. Also, learn the argot of the classic con artist, view some videos of card scam moves and discover some patter as well, or just see how the language of the con has been used in one of the more famous papers in sociology.
posted by blahblahblah on Aug 8, 2006 - 23 comments

Celebrities A La Mode

Max Factors: What do Tom Hanks, Patrick Swayze, and Sigourney Weaver have in common? Well, let's just say that da Vinci isn't the only code featuring Tom Hanks these days. (Previously, on MetaFilter) (Some text may be NSFW)
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson on Jul 10, 2006 - 18 comments

Dude!

Dude!...Dude. [via AIR]
posted by bigmike on Feb 4, 2006 - 22 comments

Wine Spodee-O-Dee, Drinkin' Wine

Spodee (among other spellings) is a Pacific Northwest party drink, a mixture of alcohol and fruit, frequently made in a trash can and left to marinate a day or two before the party. The origin of the word is unknown, but it seems likely to come from the classic R&B song "Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee" by Stick McGhee, which in 1949, was the first big hit record for Atlantic Records. (More inside, including links to sound files)
posted by litlnemo on Feb 1, 2006 - 60 comments

Shhhhh...type quitely...

Crapulous, katzenjammer, tosspot- etymology of inebriation Good words for explaining what happend last night and has continued on in it's demonic form for many hours past it's welcome....
posted by superchris on Jan 1, 2006 - 6 comments

The bowler's Holding, the batsman's Willey

The Origins and Common Usage of British Swear-words.
posted by nthdegx on Jul 4, 2005 - 47 comments

Riding the rails: hopper tales and boxcar art

A dictionary of old hobo slang might be a handy tool to bring along when traveling through North Bank Fred's colorful stories, photos, and chalkings of today's hobo jungles.
posted by madamjujujive on Mar 2, 2005 - 16 comments

I'll see you in MetaTalk, supak!

Is your favorite swear word losing its potency? Stock up on some new ones with the Swearsaurus, a "vast array of swearing, profanity, obscenity, blasphemy, cursing, cussing, and insulting in a massive 165 languages"
posted by Quartermass on Feb 27, 2005 - 21 comments

money without LSD

The Infinite Teen Slang Dictionary
For example, screef   ☛ from MonkeyFilter
posted by Ethereal Bligh on Feb 27, 2005 - 61 comments

Who's Your Daddy?

Protective Pairing for Punks: a primer on sexual relationships in prison. (no images, text mildly NSFW) Also: The Lexicon of Prison Slang, and essays by condemned prisoner Michael Hunter.
posted by fandango_matt on Dec 14, 2004 - 149 comments

Slanguage

Safire's latest list of slang
posted by srboisvert on Dec 3, 2004 - 91 comments

Willy Safizzle discovers the izzle; milkshake not far behind?

William Safire on "the izzle": "And now, in the pages of The New York Times, there it is — a word modified with the ubiquitous izzle. Some clever Times copy editor, for a June article about Chrysler's new 300C sedan, created the headline, "Fo' Shizzle, That Big Bad Chrysler Really Does Sizzle". So now that the gray lady herself has been izzled from the inside, is it time for everyone to wish one last fond farewizzle and shed the shizzle? (MTV interview mentioned in the article is here.)
posted by taz on Sep 21, 2004 - 33 comments

30's slang lovers rejoice!

Is Golan Cipel a "gunsel"? Gov. McGreevey's friend Golan Cipel appears to meet the original Maltese Falcon definition (a young man 'kept' for sex by an older man), but not it's later, derived one. Slantpoint provides a timeline of the relationship.
posted by Jos Bleau on Aug 13, 2004 - 6 comments

One for the cybersouses

Drunk Talk. Modern Drunkard's new crop of bar slang.
posted by Ufez Jones on Jul 21, 2004 - 14 comments

Page: 1 2