305 posts tagged with song.
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On-the-fly harmonizing

Looping, live: David Ford, Imogen Heap, KT Tunstall x2, Dub FX, Ed Alleyne-Johnson
posted by flatluigi on Apr 7, 2009 - 50 comments

The Nano Song

The Nano Song. Teaching the wonders of nanotechnology to puppets. This is one of the submissions to the NanoTube Contest. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Mar 1, 2009 - 13 comments

Jimmy Smith Park

Jimmy Smith Park. Breadcrumbs so you can find your way back: Jimmy Smith Park -> About -> Rivers Park -> Dreams about Drunks -> The evolution of previously.
posted by xorry on Feb 21, 2009 - 11 comments


Ladies and gentlemen, would you please rise for the Grouch Anthem? (Background)
posted by grobstein on Feb 8, 2009 - 22 comments

Story From North America

Story From North America. A boy learns to appreciate life in all its forms via song.
posted by ludwig_van on Jan 5, 2009 - 8 comments

Somebody famous

This single link youtube post singing about assassination in cartoon form cheered me up. (via itslikespiders.com)
posted by Sparx on Dec 11, 2008 - 15 comments

< 3

Less Than Three... oh emm gee. [SLYT]
posted by grapefruitmoon on Nov 10, 2008 - 30 comments

We Can Talk Politics All Night

You Can Vote However You Like
posted by Navelgazer on Nov 3, 2008 - 17 comments


posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 on Oct 22, 2008 - 58 comments

Internet overload

Internet Overdose Song (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by pearlybob on Oct 21, 2008 - 23 comments

Stayin' Alive. Literally.

The Bee Gees' Stayin' Alive can be used as a training tool for CPR, because it has a near-perfect rhythm for timing compressions, it's well-known and it has a tendency to get stuck in your head. Unfortunately, another song useful for training, with a similar rhythm, isn't quite so uplifting.
posted by Cool Papa Bell on Oct 17, 2008 - 36 comments

The Commons

It's the commons, our right of birth
And to you who would own everything all around the Earth
Our future is your downfall, when we cut this ball and chain
You who'd sacrifice the public good for your private gain
posted by finite on Oct 3, 2008 - 11 comments

"No, Miss Vega. Consider the Black Box theory!"

"So, that’s my long and winding history of a little postcard from the Upper West Side of Manhattan!" Suzanne Vega writes about writing the hit song Tom's Diner, coping with its numerous remixes, and its part in the birth of the MP3 music compression format.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Sep 24, 2008 - 34 comments

Whalesong and ocean sounds

The Jupiter Foundation and the Whalesong Project are both organizations which record humpback whale songs from floating buoys; some of their archived recordings can be found here, here, and here. (Warning, last two may resize your browser.) DOSITS hosts a more comprehensive collection of oceanic sounds, with seals and fish along with its whales and dolphins. It also has a couple of nice sections on how animals use sounds in the ocean. (Previously.) [more inside]
posted by Upton O'Good on Sep 7, 2008 - 9 comments

Indiana Jones' Temple of Doom Theme Song

If adventure has a name, it must have an electric violin solo!
posted by dhammond on Aug 26, 2008 - 23 comments

Something Of Boris

Adam Buxton and Joe Cornish of Adam & Joe fame put forward their proposals for the theme tune for the upcoming Bond film Quantum Of Solace
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 9, 2008 - 14 comments

You may ask yourself, how do I work this? David Byrne on robots

David Byrne writes three thoughtful essays on robots, song, and the uncanny valley on the occasion of the creation of a robot which sings in his voice at a Madrid museum: Visiting the robot factory in Texas, regarding the uncanny valley, on machines and souls.
posted by whir on Aug 8, 2008 - 15 comments

All you need to know, really...

The BBQ Song
posted by konolia on Aug 4, 2008 - 46 comments

I will try not to sing on a Kia

For those still wondering what the hell Joe Cocker was singing in 1969 at Woodstock in his landmark version of "A Little Help From My Friends", this hilarious video"transcription" (with some visuals added to the footage) should help. For purists, the original unedited version here.
posted by Seekerofsplendor on Jun 20, 2008 - 63 comments

copyrite more like copyrong

"Happy Birthday to You" is the best-known and most frequently sung song in the world. Many - including Justice Breyer in his dissent in Eldred v. Ashcroft - have portrayed it as an unoriginal work that is hardly worthy of copyright protection, but nonetheless remains under copyright. Yet close historical scrutiny reveals both of those assumptions to be false. [Full pdf here.] [via] [more inside]
posted by dersins on Jun 19, 2008 - 57 comments

Listen to the jingle, the rumble and the roar...

You'd be forgiven for thinking that the iconic American folk song The Wabash Cannonball was written as a tribute to an actual train, but in fact, in an interesting case of life-imitates-art, the actual train name was inspired by the song. The Lake Erie, Wabash, and St. Louis Railroad Company was formed in 1852, but there was no train called the “Cannonball” when the song was first sung late in the 19th century. There have been many, many, many wonderful versions through the years, but I think Roy Acuff pretty much owns it, wouldn't you say? [NOTE: See hoverovers for link descriptions] [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jun 7, 2008 - 20 comments

This are the world.

The Japanese master intercultural stereotyping. Is it racist when non-whites do blackface?
posted by parmanparman on May 25, 2008 - 71 comments

Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?

Songs that clearly and directly address or reference economic hardships and injustice in America, not to mention that do so in a bitter, regretful tone, don't often become enormous hits. Matter of fact, it's such a rare phenomenon that you could count such songs on... um, one finger? Yes, Yip Harburg and Jay Gorney's iconic Brother Can You Spare a Dime is that song. Covered by a surprisingly wide range of singers through the years, the song still resonates. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on May 10, 2008 - 55 comments

The day my mama socked it to the Harper Valley PTA

Sometimes, when you've had your fill of people basking in the golden light of their self-righteous indignation, you just wanna hear a song about somebody telling those holier-than-thou-ers where to get off. Something like, say, Harper Valley PTA. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 24, 2008 - 39 comments

I love arachnids! I love hot magma!

Feel good hit of the year; Discovery Channel's 'I Love the Whole World' ad [more inside]
posted by oxford blue on Apr 19, 2008 - 103 comments

Wine motherfucker, drinkin' wine.

The best-known version of that joyful ode to getting smashed, Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee, would surely be the Jerry Lee Lewis rendition, and Memphis rockabilly singer Johnny Burnette recorded a hopping little version of the tune as well. But the song was written and originally recorded by Stick (aka "Sticks") McGhee, who adapted it from a chant he learned during his stint in the Army. And yes, "spo-dee-o-dee" was a substitute for another word, which, though fine for the Army, wasn't exactly radio friendly. Stick wrote a few other tunes in celebration of the alcoholic beverage, including "Six To Eight" and "Jungle Juice". And as has been pointed out previously, the song title was likely the inspiration for the alcoholic concoction known as the "spodi". Drink up!
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 13, 2008 - 8 comments

Ethnographic materials from the Himalayan region

Apa Tani bleeding tubes filmed by Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf and Paro, Bhutan in 1936 from Frederick Williamson, are just two of the extraordinary offerings from the Digital Himalaya Project.
posted by tellurian on Apr 3, 2008 - 8 comments

I know a bot

A Swedish pop song about IRC is resurrected into an English number one hit.
posted by hugsnkisses on Mar 8, 2008 - 60 comments

Don't Stop Believin'

Who knew when Arnel Pineda, lead singer of a Journey cover band called "The Zoo," posted videos of his band on YouTube that he'd grab the attention of Journey itself and be invited to be its new lead singer? (via) [more inside]
posted by flatluigi on Feb 22, 2008 - 70 comments

If you can't say it in words, say it in song

A most succinct explanation of the current problems facing Wall Street.
posted by Lord_Pall on Feb 8, 2008 - 26 comments

No Reason To Get Excited

Written in 1967 by Bob Dylan, it was originally quiet, lowkey... and vaguely menacing. But when Jimi Hendrix redefined it the following year, even Dylan knew that the song had changed forever.

Since then, it's been covered (over and over again), praised almost as often, analyzed, referenced, and, of course, found to be encoded in the minds of Cylons.

Originally released 40 years ago, erm, yesterday: All Along the Watchtower.
posted by John Kenneth Fisher on Dec 28, 2007 - 41 comments

the hellidays spirit

A good chuckle about surviving the hellidays: Dysfunctional Family Holidays, the music l an interactive karaoke with several songs l What exactly is a dysfunctional family? l What are the roles for the kids? [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Dec 25, 2007 - 4 comments

Do Do ... DoDoDo ... Do Do ... DoDoDo

Merry Christmas, Mefites! Even if you don't celebrate Christmas, you might enjoy this fun bit of flash goodness.
posted by bwg on Dec 13, 2007 - 42 comments


It's Turkey Time! (mp3) And this song is playing in my head, over and over... [more inside]
posted by ba on Nov 22, 2007 - 20 comments

What's the name of that song?

Just watched a tv show, looking for the music you just heard? Playing the radio, and didn't catch the DJ saying the title? On the go? In the woods? (Also)
posted by desjardins on Aug 14, 2007 - 14 comments

Prayforming in the Park

Thoth has been the subject of an Oscar-winning documentary. He's appeared on "America's Got Talent. And he's one of the most mesmerizing street performers out there. [Previously]
posted by dersins on Aug 2, 2007 - 67 comments

Vulgar Song and Slang from the 19th Century and earlier

Francis Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue from 1811. Canting Dictionary (thieving slang) from 1736. Three Centuries of Canting Songs and Slang Rhymes (1536–1896). Before you end up scragged, ottomised, and grinning in a glass case, you should learn to sing Frisky Moll's Song... and know what the heck it means:
A famble, a tattle, and two popps,
Had my Boman when he was ta’en;
But had he not bouz’d in the diddle shops,
He’d still been in Drury-Lane.

posted by Kattullus on Jul 1, 2007 - 15 comments


The new video for Paul McCartney's UK single, "Dance Tonight" starring Natalie Portman.
posted by semmi on May 29, 2007 - 63 comments

Bolt ya nugget.

Bolt ya nugget. A send up of ned culture in Glasgow. [Single youtube link alert]
posted by ClanvidHorse on May 18, 2007 - 39 comments

Word Dissassociation

Word Dissassociation A lovely little song made up of completely random words.
posted by lazaruslong on Apr 28, 2007 - 22 comments

Make the Logo Bigger

Make the logo bigger. (mp3) The fine folks at Speak Up provide a bit more explanation. One can only assume that the follow-up hit will be entitled either 'Split the Difference' or 'The Client Loved It, But They're Changing Everything.'
posted by ba on Apr 20, 2007 - 44 comments

The Kansas City Sheet Music Collection

The Kansas City Sheet Music Collection is an enormous catalog of zoomable, high-rez scans of old sheet music. See how the popular music of years past was marketed with Black and Native American imagery as well as exotica. There are lovely and fanciful calligraphic designs, songs of World War 1 and, uh, vegetables. There's even a little ditty by Mark Twain. Plus some undeniable truths and the age-old question.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 13, 2007 - 8 comments

Et tu?

Beware the Ides of March. Almost everyone knows that the phrase comes from the story of the assassination of Julius Caesar, most familiarly in the Shakespeare version, although "The Life of Augustus," written by Nicolauas of Damascus, contains what is thought to be the earliest narrative of the plot to murder Julius Caesar, based in part on eyewitness accounts. But, not everyone knows that The Ides Of March is also a band [flash intro] (best known for the song "Vehicle") [YouTube], an epistolatory novel by Thornton Wilder (with forward by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.), an instrumental song by Iron Maiden [YouTube], and two paintings, one by Edward Poynter and one by Andrew Wyeth.
posted by amyms on Mar 15, 2007 - 10 comments


The Red Army Choir vs The Mormon Tabernacle Choir. (hypothetical) Battle of the Century.
posted by Stynxno on Feb 21, 2007 - 15 comments

Haaaaah ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! The Laughing Policeman!

When I was a kid, my dad, who grew up in London, during the Blitz, used to play this old record: a song called "The Laughing Policeman." It always put a smile on my face. According to Wikipedia, it was written in 1922 by Charles Jolly, who wrote "numerous other laughing songs (The Laughing Major, Curate, Steeplechaser, Typist, Lover, etc)." If you want to hear the happiest policeman ever, here's the mp3. The song has inspired cartoonists, mystery novelists (great series, by the way!), filmmakers, a more-recent recording (mp3), and, inevitably, some scary people on youtube. Speaking of youtube, this is how I remember the song.
posted by grumblebee on Feb 11, 2007 - 41 comments

Sabbath Filter

War Pigs : An unofficial video for Cake's cover of War Pigs, previously covered by Faith No More.. Originals by Black Sabbath.
posted by hypersloth on Feb 2, 2007 - 140 comments

"One side has power, and one side does not"

A Mall Divided (youtube) - a musical tale of commerce, employment and electrical distribution for our times.
posted by Artw on Dec 18, 2006 - 9 comments

Get Your Dirty Barb Off Me, You Damn Dirty Stingray!!

An American troubadour pays tribute with a Steve Irwin death song, while the Australians blokes insist that stingrays must pay!!!
posted by jonp72 on Sep 15, 2006 - 29 comments

Doesn't matter if you're a grandma, or a 7-year-old girl ...

"Don't Download This Song." A free, and rather hilarious, download from "Weird Al" Yankovic done in the 'charity gospel' "We are the World" style, including a few gems in the lyrics like "even Lars Ulrich knows it's wrong." Direct MP3 link. Music video evidently coming shortly.
posted by WCityMike on Aug 22, 2006 - 35 comments

The Worst and Therefore Greatest Musical of All Time

"Where Does He Get Those Wonderful Toys?" [MP3] A stupefying song (sung by the Joker) from a forthcoming Batman musical, written and sung by Jim Steinman of Bat Out of Hell fame. He discusses the matter in depth on his blog. If it's a hoax I fell for it. But a cursory Google search bears it out!
posted by BackwardsCity on Jul 24, 2006 - 17 comments

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