Skip

52 posts tagged with synthesizer.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 52. Subscribe:

betcha Brian Eno's gonna snap this baby up...

If you've got 20,000 to 30,000 bucks burning a hole in your pocket, you might consider purchasing the world's first electronic music synthesizer: the Helmholtz, which is up for auction.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Sep 24, 2014 - 22 comments

Synergy: A Word Without An Anagram

Synergy is the name of the project that composer/engineer Larry Fast gave to his series of space rock albums, based on his groundbreaking synthesizer work, and beginning with 1975's Electronic Realizations for Rock Orchestra. [more inside]
posted by fairmettle on Sep 7, 2014 - 15 comments

808state​:psycho​ecstatic​tranceenducing​groove​riding​techno​funk​alogical​sound

808 State is an English electronic group that formed in 1987, and take their name from the Roland TR-808 drum machine and their shared state of mind. As a trio, they produced their iconic track, Pacific, which fused influences of house music, jazz fusion and exotica. The group changed membership a bit over the years, but one way or another 808 State have released six albums* to date, and a number of singles, EPs, and promotional discs. 808state.com has a ton of information, including an extensive visual discography, a list of other productions and remixes, and over a gig of demos, live tracks, and other non-album audio to download. Given the group's 27 year-long history, there's a lot more to see and hear. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 7, 2014 - 30 comments

New patch release

Musician Charles Cohen (previously) hosts a workshop at Berlin's Schneidersladen, demonstrating the use of the rare and recently re-released Buchla Music Easel
posted by Mr. Six on Aug 1, 2014 - 5 comments

Is that a synth filling your apartment, or are you just glad to see me?

Moogfest is in full swing in Asheville, NC, and Moog Music just unveiled a faithful reproduction of Keith Emerson's original Moog Modular system. Emerson, Lake & Palmer's Lucky Man (SLYT) was one of the first professional recordings to feature a Moog synth. Apparently playing both the original and the facsimile simultaneously is a pretty orgasmic experience.
posted by sutt on Apr 26, 2014 - 45 comments

A simple, concise and informative primer:

THE 14 SYNTHESIZERS THAT SHAPED MODERN MUSIC
posted by flapjax at midnite on Mar 3, 2014 - 97 comments

Mr. Rick Wakeman on keyboards ... and various other concerns

Whether taking all mankind close to the edge with his keyboard contributions to every punk's favorite prog-rock band Yes, or going it solo (in fully sequined gown) with all Six Wives of Henry VIII all the way to the center of the earth, or perhaps with figure skating Knights of the Round Table, or composing the score for Ken Russell's Liztomania (and "acting" in it), or doing definitive session work for the likes of David Bowie, Black Sabbath, etc, or candidly singing the praises of Christianity and/or Freemasonry ... [more inside]
posted by philip-random on Dec 21, 2013 - 34 comments

Home again, home again, jiggity-jig. Goooood evening, J. D.!

Their hearts are not hearts, but clockwork springs. Their lungs are not lungs, but leather bellows. They are: Jack Donovan's Princely Toys [more inside]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Nov 20, 2013 - 12 comments

littleBits + KORG Synth Kit

"The Synth Kit that just hit the market originated a year ago, at a TED conference where Bdeir and comedian/musician Reggie Watts met backstage after giving talks, and started discussing the idea of littleBits musical instruments."
posted by kliuless on Nov 13, 2013 - 47 comments

The 1960s experimental collaborations of Raymond Scott and Jim Henson

"Gentlemen: I have a story that may be of interest to you. It is not widely known who invented the circuitry concept for the automatic sequential performance of musical pitches - now well known as a sequencer. I, however, do know who the inventor was - for it was I who first conceived and built the sequencer." This is the opening to an undated, unaddressed letter, found in Raymond Scott's personal papers (yes, the same fellow whose kooky soundtracks scored everything from Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies to Ren & Stimpy, The Simpson, and Animaniacs). You can read the rest of Scott's letter, along with Bob Moog's recollections of visiting Raymond's electronics laboratory in the mid-1950s. Or you could jump ahead to the mid-1960s, when Jim Henson was in his late 20s to early 30s, and he was working on a variety of odd projects after a successful run with Sam and Friends, but before he it it big with Sesame Street. It was at this point that he teamed up with Scott on a few short, experimental films. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 12, 2013 - 11 comments

Totally modular, dude

Every now and then it's just good for the soul to hear a nice, filtery, fat and squelchy analog modular synthesizer, don'tcha think? Let's drop in on David Baron, then, who's been kind enough to offer us a taste of several of the finest modular machines ever made, in his Tour Of The Universe - Analog Modular Synthesizer Journey. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jun 12, 2013 - 21 comments

Vo-96 Acoustic Synthesizer

How Inventor Paul Vo Created a Little Black Box That Could Change Guitars Forever
posted by kliuless on Apr 20, 2013 - 41 comments

Vangelis, "The City."

Πολλών δ' ανθρώπων είδεν άστεα και νόον έγνω. [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on Sep 27, 2012 - 35 comments

Great Googley Moogley

Celebrating the memory of beloved synth pioneer Bob Moog and commemorating his birthday, Google's home page (currently in Australia, live in the US tomorrow) is a fully working, multi-trackable Moog synthesizer. Share your masterpiece!
posted by naju on May 22, 2012 - 41 comments

Wendy Carlos' "Beauty in the Beast"

Wendy Carlos is best known for Switched-On Bach, the best-selling album that popularized the Moog synthesizer, and the soundtracks for A Clockwork Orange and Tron. But what she calls her "most important album" is the 1986 recording Beauty in the Beast, whose experiments with instrumentation, tonality, and scaling are described in these two PDF reproductions of contemporary articles from Keyboard magazine. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on May 21, 2012 - 30 comments

'Legends of the Cassette Underground'

When not terrorizing Mr Bond, from the late 1970s until 1994, Mike Mangino and Chris Shepard were in a basement full of musical toys, novelty space microphones, a TR-606, and a SH-09 in Piscataway, NJ recording cassettes as the band Smersh. In 1981 Smersh released their first cassette under their own label of Atlas King. They never rehearsed, they couldn't read music, and they never played live, and they contributed to far too many compilations throughout the known world. In the early eighties they established a unique sound that is known and loved, combining cheap electronics and wild guitar sounds with distorted vocals. By trading cassettes they garnered international acclaim leading to releases on dozens of other labels. [more inside]
posted by wcfields on Dec 22, 2011 - 5 comments

buzz buzz buzz

In 1978 a tiny English company called Electronic Dream Plant produced their first product, the EDP Wasp synthesizer, the first of a short-lived range of creepy-crawly-named devices. In the golden age of big wooden and metal synths the wasp was made of plastic, battery-powered, with a built-in speaker, a keyboard with no moving parts, and used a brilliantly minimalist CMOS circuit design (in fact, people are still copying the Wasp filter circuit). It was the first analog synth to be truly affordable. The Wasp's accessibility, unique sound and portability saw it quickly used by musicians ranging from buskers to rock stars. [more inside]
posted by w0mbat on Nov 24, 2011 - 22 comments

Women in Electronic Music

"Daphne Oram was the first woman to direct an electronic music studio, the first woman to set up a personal studio and the first woman to design and construct an electronic musical instrument." [previously: 1, 2, 3] [more inside]
posted by spiderskull on Oct 1, 2011 - 13 comments

Snap, Crackle, Rattle and Hum.

40 Noises That Built Pop [parts 234]
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane on Sep 7, 2011 - 79 comments

Realistic MG-1 Synthesizer by Moog Music

The Realistic MG-1 Synthesizer with 'polyphony', built by Moog Music in 1981 for the home market and sold through Radio Shack stores for $499. Despite its toy-like appearance, its tones are quite serviceable. Sound demos: Classic Moog filter tones. 1 2. A thorough demonstration of each knob, switch and slider, 1 2 3 4 5, filtering audio, and with a sequencer.
posted by Ardiril on Jul 15, 2011 - 27 comments

Write Your Own Software Synth

The creator of the PSynth app for iPhone explains the basics of software synthesizers in a series of articles on Dr. Dobbs. Creating Oscillators. The Synthesizer Core. The final article promises delays and phasers. The source code is java so the example synth is easily extendable.
posted by Ardiril on Jun 28, 2011 - 15 comments

Early portable (?) synthesis: the Hammond Solovox

A tour inside a Hammond Solovox circa 1940s, a monophonic synth/organ and "a scaled down mono version of the 170-tube 500-some-pound Hammond Novacord", by Bob Weigel. via
posted by Ardiril on Mar 6, 2011 - 9 comments

I can't pick which of these to post, so you're getting both

Why Cecco Beppe Does Not Die (Scratch 'n' Sniff Edition), a reenactment of the lost 1916 Futurist film Vita Futurista by the neutered cat responsible for the sleeper hit Valentine for Perfect Strangers (DLYT)
posted by shii on Jan 10, 2011 - 10 comments

"Another Green World" - Brian Eno BBC documentary

Earlier this year, the BBC's Arena produced and aired an excellent documentary on Brian Eno entitled "Another Green World" containing "a series of conversations on science, art, systems analysis, producing and cybernetics". [more inside]
posted by item on Dec 26, 2010 - 20 comments

Dan McPharlin: Sci-Fi Surrealism (and Mini Analog Synth Models)

Dan McPharlin is an Australian artist who creates fantastic landscapes that seem more likely to come from sci-fi novels from decades past than an artist who who gives away his music for donations (YT sample). McPharlin also made a series of miniature analog synthesizers that were featured on album art for Steve Jansen's album Slope (YT sample), as well as Moog Acid by Jean-Jacques Perrey & Luke Vibert (YT sample). Currently, McPharlin's website only has an 18 page portfolio in PDF form and an email address, but his Flickr collection is a sight to behold. Even his house looks like something from a 1970s photo shoot. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 3, 2010 - 10 comments

Make Music Anywhere

Pocket music apps are letting composers and artists create music anywhere - and they're developing fast. [more inside]
posted by Stark on Aug 11, 2010 - 51 comments

Roland TB-303

The Silver Dream Machine: The synthesizer that accidentally changed the world.
posted by gman on Jun 8, 2010 - 42 comments

CodeOrgan

If MetaFilter took a shower, this is what it would sing. [via] [more inside]
posted by robcorr on Feb 19, 2010 - 56 comments

It's made of people!

The Humanthesizer. Calvin Harris is promoting his new single by using a type of skin-safe conductive ink to "play" his song with the assistance of, ah, several assistants. [more inside]
posted by Halloween Jack on Aug 12, 2009 - 29 comments

He ain't heavy, he's my guitar ...

"The StringStation introduces a fresh and inventive playing surface allowing one musician to play in real time on an instrument that offers thunderous bass, compelling rhythm, 3-D orchestration and melody. It uses new ways to approach groups of strings that find amazing intertwined performance techniques. It opens and lays out new paths to evolve tactile music composition skills." It's the baby of engineer/inventor Jim Bartz, who is on a mission to bring his invention into the musical mainstream. Start your exploration of what the StringStation can do with this video of Bartz playing his prototype model (actual performance comes in at 2:25). [more inside]
posted by woodblock100 on May 8, 2009 - 28 comments

Keyboard Cat

Play him off, keyboard cat. [more inside]
posted by Greg Nog on May 6, 2009 - 146 comments

Oh Say Can You See The Way I Play "In C"?

Terry Riley celebrates the 45th anniversary of his groundbreaking composition, In C. A major work in the history of minimalist music, In C has an incredibly flexible score and performance guidelines, which have inspired many musicians to make their own versions, including a French guitar quintet, a traditional Chinese orchestra, a keyboard ensemble, an all-synthesizer group, CalArts Music students, French-Canadian hippies, a Danish vocal and percussion ensemble, another percussion ensemble, Japanese acidheads, a "laptop orchestra", the Bang on a Can Orchestra, and a rock "orchestration" by the Styrenes. No two versions can sound exactly the same, but it's still an open question how they will compare to the performance of In C at its Carnegie Hall debut next month. No recording of the original 1964 performance has ever been publicly released, but some eyewitness accounts can be found here.
posted by jonp72 on Mar 4, 2009 - 40 comments

The Earliest Synthesizer

The Hammond Novachord: Introduced in 1939, it was the world's first subtractive synthesis synthesizer and built with all the cutting edge technology of the time: 169 vacuum tubes, 12 oscillators, 60 frequency dividers, 60 band pass filters, 72 VCA's, and weighing in at 500 pounds. You've likely heard it in dozens of films and TV shows from the 1940's to 1960's. Crazy enough to restore one? If it sounds like this, why not?
posted by Paid In Full on Dec 12, 2008 - 19 comments

The Tone Generation, A Radio History of Electronic Music

The Tone Generation is a radio series by Ian Helliwell 'looking at different themes or composers in the era of analogue tape and early synthesizer technology'. The original globe-trotting series: Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Holland, Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, USA, Canada, Rest of World. Bonus programmes: Expo 58, The RCA Synthesizer. All links are to MP3 files, except the first one. Alternatively, you can slurp down the lot in one go by subscribing to the podcast feed.
posted by jack_mo on Nov 21, 2008 - 4 comments

The Lost Synthesizer Classics of Ursula Bogner

It seems almost incredible that Ursula Bogner's musical talents should have remained undiscovered until now.
posted by jack_mo on Nov 1, 2008 - 20 comments

The majestic Synthaxe

In the wide world of synthesizer guitars, the Synthaxe may well be the choicest both in its aesthetics and its raw awesomeness could. John Hollis tells us what we're missing. Some guy demonstrates it. Allan Holdsworth whips it out in concert. Also, a music video from Lee Ritenour's Synthaxe-heavy Earth Run album.
posted by colinmarshall on Oct 18, 2008 - 25 comments

Bleeps and bloops

Charles Cohen improvises on the very rare Buchla Music Easel synthesizer.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Jul 18, 2008 - 19 comments

Synthesizer Porn

Matmos provides a song-by-song exposition of their synth-only* album Supreme Balloon, including explicit pics of the gear they used. Highlights include the Electronic Valve Instrument, the Coupigny, & everything else.

*Mostly - all sound sources were synths, some software controllers were used.
posted by univac on Jul 6, 2008 - 14 comments

The Birotron: The Keyboard of the Future

In 1975, armed with a big pile of 8-track car stereos and a whole lot of moxie, Dave Biro set out to change the sound of rock music. He failed spectacularly. This is the fascinating and tragic story of one of the rarest instruments in rock music- The Birotron. [more inside]
posted by 40 Watt on Oct 1, 2007 - 19 comments

More Popcorn than you can stomach

Hear them all...... The most famous version of the early synthesizer hit "Popcorn" was played in 1972 by a studio group called Hot Butter, led by legendary session musician Stan Free. Few people know that the song was actually written by electronic music pioneer Gershon Kingsley. If you'd like to hear excerpts of Kingsley's original version, along with scores of cover versions, here ya go.
posted by metasonix on May 30, 2007 - 47 comments

Music Porn

Music Porn - Synthesizer sex.
posted by loquacious on Mar 4, 2007 - 16 comments

See-Through Synth

Listening to a machine made entirely of windows.
posted by Mach5 on Mar 2, 2007 - 11 comments

Old School!

An old dog learns new tricks The venerable Atari 2600 may no longer be at the forefront of high-end gaming, but that won't keep it down for long. Its new career? Drum & Bass synthesizer(warning: ugly, ugly site), complete with MIDI.
posted by lekvar on Jan 30, 2007 - 15 comments

The New Style

A new type of synth. Straight from Barcelona.
posted by pwedza on Nov 5, 2006 - 40 comments

Machine-made synthesizer weirdness.

Doktor Future's modular synthesizer has been set up to send a real audio stream, 24/7. The analog modular synthesizer will be running a quadraphonic aleatoric patch that will change from day to day. (via Matrixsynth)
posted by zonkout on Sep 19, 2006 - 10 comments

The World's Cutest Synth!

Have you ever seen a synth and said "Man, what this needs is cartoon eyes?" A bit similar to the Buchla Box or theremin in that they don't have a keyboard to control the sounds -- it's probably closest to the Booper, invented by The Weatherman from Negativland (or, well, Circuit Bending), the Thingamagoop is a photosynthesizer... which means it basically uses light sensors to generate sounds. The signal's run through a couple oscillators and, well, it comes out as somethin' that's pretty dang awesome. I'm on the fence on pickin' this one up. On one hand, it's a really neat toy that makes noise... on the other hand, um.... um.... I dunno. It's not made of candy?
posted by Rev. Syung Myung Me on Jul 8, 2006 - 18 comments

"Oh, two-fingered guru."

"The Samchillian Tip Tip Tip Cheeepeeeee is a [computer] keyboard MIDI controller of my own invention based on changes of pitch, rather than fixed pitches. This scheme gives the performer the ability to perform extremely quick, rhapsodical lines." Perfect for the music nerd on your Christmas list. Complete with "instructional" video (53MB .mov) and mp3s. I'm on a Mac so I can't try out the freeware version.
posted by Cryptical Envelopment on Dec 1, 2004 - 17 comments

They never forget they're tough trucks

Building a Better Way: Music from the 1974 Chevrolet Announcement Film • "An interesting look at some of the musical trends from the early 70s. A little Isaac Hayes, a little John Denver, some Allman Brothers and a few sounds from that new-fangled instrument, the synthesizer."
posted by dhoyt on Jun 21, 2004 - 7 comments

Museum of Soviet synthesizers

Museum of Soviet synthesizers.
posted by soundofsuburbia on Feb 20, 2003 - 16 comments

At&T New Text to Speech thingy

At&T New Text to Speech thingy - HAL I'm coming.
posted by kramer_101 on Sep 5, 2001 - 14 comments

Page: 1 2
Posts