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24 posts tagged with tarantino.
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Tarantino has done for Mother's Day what Charlie Brown did for Christmas

ER One Shot (YT): one long opening shot from the Quentin Tarantino-directed episode of the TV series ER. Blog post | less bloggy, more pagey, format. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 9, 2014 - 11 comments

Homage Warehouse

KillBillreference is a YouTube account (apparently defunct) that curates clips of a handful of the movies that Quentin Tarantino has drawn reference from. Primarily these are references from Kill Bill, but other movies like Pulp Fiction sneak in as well. For example, Elle Driver's whistle song as it first appeared in Twisted Nerve, the music from O-Ren Ishii's origin story as it first appeared in I Lunghi Giorni Della Vendetta, an eye plucking scene from Five Fingers of Death, and Mia's square gesture from Pulp Fiction as originally performed by Betty Rubble. [more inside]
posted by codacorolla on Sep 25, 2014 - 10 comments

Tarantino's Hateful Eight script leak: Mistrust, coffee, swearing ensue

I gave it to three motherf***ing actors. We met in a place, and I put it in their hands. Reggie Hudlin’s agent never had a copy. It’s got to be either the agents of Dern or Madsen. Please name names.” Quentin Tarantino decided he won't make The Hateful Eight, which was slated to be his next big film. The script is now floating around the 'net, and summaries of the plot abound, telling of an ensemble cast in a very bloody Western centered on bounty hunters. If you don't want to track down the 146 page document, here is a summary of the six "most Tarantino" elements in the film, which was to be shot in 70 mm film, and in CinemaScope to boot. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 27, 2014 - 159 comments

Leo just kept ingesting sweet crap

Dan Goodbaum edits together selected excerpts from Elvis Mitchell's interview with Quentin Tarantino about the role of food as a indicator of power in his movies (full interview here). Grantland's 20 Best Tarantino Food Scenes
posted by The Whelk on Apr 21, 2013 - 13 comments

Quentin Tarantino Screenplays

A Set of Penguin style book covers re-imagined for Quentin Tarantino's screenplays.
posted by SkylitDrawl on Mar 24, 2013 - 29 comments

Django, in chains

Actor and producer Jesse Williams has written an article about the issues he has with Quentin Tarantino's film Django Unchained, including the ahistorical portrayal of slavery and the lack of agency shown by the movie's black characters. He expands the argument on his blog (image NSFW).
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Feb 27, 2013 - 95 comments

Violence is so good

Quentin Tarantino clashed with News anchor Krishnan Guru-Murthy during a fractious interview ahead of the London premiere of his new film. Tarantino has previously defended the gore that defines his movies, saying "that's the biggest attraction. I'm a big fan of action and violence in cinema".
posted by Lanark on Jan 11, 2013 - 138 comments

"The best way to honor [Nat Turner, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Tubman] is not with tasteful, funereal reverence but some real attempt to measure the dimensions of the stretch of history they occupied.

In a lengthy back-and-forth discussion about Django Unchained, critics Steven Boone and Odie Henderson discuss the subtleties of Tarantino's racial commentary (as well, as, of course, the more blatant commentaries), their thoughts on Spike Lee's criticism of the film, and Tarantino's vast and nuanced range of inspirations. Elsewhere, Tarantino responds to a critic who called a plot point in Django "harebrained", and what ensues offers an interesting insight into how Tarantino thinks about his characters.
posted by Rory Marinich on Jan 3, 2013 - 169 comments

Bloodier Is Better

"We had a bunch of extras from the community, St. John the Baptist Parish. It was cool, re-creating this history with black Southern extras whose families have lived there forever. They knew what went on back then. Then there was a social-dividing issue between the extras that mirrored the ones between their slave characters in the movie. The ponies were pretty, and they looked down on the extras playing cotton-picker slaves. They thought they were better than them. And the people playing the house servants looked down on the people playing the cotton pickers. And the cotton pickers thought the people playing the house servants and the ponies were stuck-up bitches. Then there was a fourth breakdown, between the darker skinned and the lighter skinned. Obviously not for everybody, and it wasn’t a gigantic problem, but it was something you noticed. They started mirroring the social situations of their characters, being on this plantation for a few weeks."
Playboy interview with Quentin Tarantino for the upcoming Django Unchained.
[more inside]
posted by mannequito on Dec 11, 2012 - 78 comments

They've killed Bill!

Who do you think you're fooling? A comparison of Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs and Ringo Lam's City on Fire. (Vimeo) [more inside]
posted by mediated self on Oct 14, 2012 - 64 comments

You sound like my wife.

Spike Lee on New York, Obama, film, Hollywood, reality teevee, marriage equality, Taylor Lautner, and so forth.
posted by shakespeherian on Jul 9, 2012 - 84 comments

Django. The D is silent.

Quentin Tarantino is back. [more inside]
posted by mysticreferee on Jun 6, 2012 - 121 comments

How to make sense of Conspiracy Theories

"How to make sense of Conspiracy Theories" [Part 1 of 9 from YouTube] Rob Ager is best known for his very thoughtful analyses of films such as The Shining [see also this analysis of the Overlook's geometry, previously], A Clockwork Orange [and supplement], Psycho, Pulp Fiction, Aliens, Taxi Driver and others. He has recently completed an analysis of the subject of conspiracy theories. "All of us, from time to time, will believe that two or more people in a particular context have conspired to achieve a mutual aim – be it cheating in a card game or engineering an international war. It isn’t by definition a lapse in logic to believe that a conspiracy has or is going to occur in a given situation. Conspiracies do happen and it is a natural facet of healthy thinking and self-preservation to seek out awareness of conspiracies that may affect our lives." [Text version, Ager's Collative Learning site]
posted by McLir on Jan 18, 2012 - 53 comments

This is my finest film yet

"Tarantino is on record as saying that this movie is his “bunch-of- guys-on-a-mission film”—which would mean that it’s a version of the Dirty Dozen or The Guns of Navaron'e. Like almost everything else that Tarantino says in interviews, I think that sentence is a lie." -- The film within the film that is Inglorious Basterds. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Nov 16, 2011 - 182 comments

Academy-Award Nominated Editor Found Dead Near Los Angeles' Griffith Park

Sally Menke, the woman who edited every Quentin Tarantino film, has died at age 56. [more inside]
posted by joechip on Sep 28, 2010 - 63 comments

The Lost Art of Inglourious Basterds

The Lost Art of Inglourious Basterds [via OMG Posters!] [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Feb 19, 2010 - 32 comments

Once Upon A Time On The Internet

Todd Alcott has written in-depth analyses of Inglourious Basterds (Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) and Death Proof (1, 2, 3) that are pretty nifty. [more inside]
posted by Toby Dammit X on Feb 11, 2010 - 102 comments

"Samurai spirit-a!"

Quentin Tarantino is the latest American celebrity to be featured in a TV commercial for SoftBank Mobile Corp, a Japanese telecommunications and media company. Tarantino stars as “Uncle Tara-chan” in the bizarre and very popular “White family” commercial series. The Whites consist of the "Mom", the daughter “Me” (a Softbank shop saleswoman played by popular singer/actress Aya Ueto), the "Older Brother" (played by African American actor Dante Carter), and the father, Otosan, who happens to be a white Hokkaido-ken dog named Kaikun.
posted by mrducts on Dec 10, 2009 - 28 comments

Don't condescend me, man. I'll fucking kill you.

True Romance: 15 years later. Maxim article (hence slightly NSFW ads) with interviews with Christian Slater, Tony Scott, Quinten Tarantino, etc. If you're a fan of behind-the-scenes gossip, or the film -- or both -- it's an interesting read.
posted by zardoz on May 27, 2008 - 46 comments

Coming Soon to a Grindhouse Near You

Sleazoid Express (this post rated NSFW) was a New York film fanzine that championed the grindhouse cinema that played in sketchy Times Square movie theaters during the pre-Giuliani era. Featuring in-depth reviews of film fare such as Pets, Nanami: Inferno of First Love, and Let Me Die A Woman, the Sleazoid Express zine later inspired a book, which can probably take some credit for stoking Quentin Tarantino's interest in grindhouse filmmaking. (An excerpt from the book, Sleazoid Express, can be found here, and here's some original grindhouse trailers thrown in for good measure.)
posted by jonp72 on Apr 5, 2007 - 12 comments

Let me tell you what "Like a Virgin" is about

What the f* were the parents of these kids thinking when they let them film these ads? (via Kotaku)
posted by phyrewerx on Aug 4, 2006 - 45 comments

Using fine-art images to promote movies

Using fine-art images to promote movies: "But it was Mr. Kessell's "Florilegium" (or "collection of floral images") daguerrotypes that caught Mr. Palen's eye: each image is close-up of a surgical instrument, so poetically rendered that it seems almost organic. Some of the macabre implements resemble exotic flowers. One, from a distance, could be mistaken for the horns of a gazelle. "We were sort of blocked, and all the pieces fell into place once I saw that image," Mr. Palen explained. A deal was made to use that daguerreotype [to promote the upcoming Tarantino-produced film "Hostel"], which actually shows a surgical clamp. [The poster] now appears in theaters and on widespread promotions. [Side: direct WMV link of Tarantino spazing out while introducing "Hostel's" director Eli Roth at a festival.]
posted by JPowers on Jan 4, 2006 - 12 comments

Edward Bunker, 1933-2005

"It has always been as if I carry chaos with me the way others carry typhoid. My purpose in writing is to transcend my existence by illuminating it."
Crime novelist Edward Bunker, who died last Tuesday at age 71 (LATimes obit), became at 17 the youngest inmate at San Quentin after he stabbed a prison guard at a youth detention facility. It was during his 18 years of incarceration for robbery, check forgery and other crimes that Bunker learned to write. In 1973, while still in prison, he made his literary debut with "No Beast So Fierce", a novel about a paroled thief James Ellroy called "quite simply one of the great crime novels of the past 30 years" and that was made into the movie "Straight Time" starring Dustin Hoffman. Also a screenwriter ("Runaway Train"), Bunker appeared as an actor in nearly two dozen roles, most notably as Mr. Blue in "Reservoir Dogs." (more inside)
posted by matteo on Jul 25, 2005 - 9 comments

Enter The Tarantino

Wait A Minute! Where's That Great Movie I Saw In The Trailer? I'm not in this world to live up to your expectations and you're not in this world to live up to mine, said Bruce Lee. Still, expectations and anticipation are an integral part of cinephilia and the fun of watching movies in general. For a lot of us, Tarantino's Kill Bill is by far the most expected movie of 2003. [The trailer and the screenplay reviews, whether enthusiastic or not, lead one to expect a sword-swallowing, fire-breathing mix of "Enter The Dragon", "Slouching Tiger, Creeping Dragon" and "Charlie's Dragon Angels". So - will it be up to Tarantino's best? I venture to say oh yes.]
And if you're not a rabid Tarrantino fan, which upcoming film(s) are you most eager to see, from now until 2006?
posted by MiguelCardoso on Apr 10, 2003 - 57 comments

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