1689 posts tagged with technology.
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Electioneering on the campaign trail

Old and new data-driven efforts implicate mind control (get out the tin foil hats) [more inside]
posted by jiblets on Feb 19, 2016 - 27 comments

The Gilded Age, Henry George, the Land Value Tax and the Progressive Era

Kim-Mai Cutler: Nothing Like This Has Ever Happened Before - "San Francisco Bay Area poverty rates in all nine counties have increased in the last economic cycle, even with the Facebook and Twitter IPOs and private tech boom. The main transfer mechanism is land and housing costs, as rising rents and evictions push service and other low-wage workers to the brink. [Henry] George's solution was a single land tax that would replace all other government revenue sources. If an owner wanted to develop their property to make it more useful or productive, George argued that they should have the right to keep the value from those efforts. But increases in the value of underlying land were created by — and ultimately belonged to — the public at large." (previously: 1,2,3) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Feb 19, 2016 - 33 comments

Disrupt this!

It’s not Cyberspace anymore (from data & society, Medium). [more inside]
posted by redct on Feb 8, 2016 - 50 comments

The future will be boring. TBD.

What is Design Fiction?
"the deliberate use of diegetic prototypes to suspend disbelief about change. That’s the best definition we’ve come up with. The important word there is diegetic. It means you’re thinking very seriously about potential objects and services and trying to get people to concentrate on those rather than entire worlds or political trends or geopolitical strategies. It’s not a kind of fiction. It’s a kind of design. It tells worlds rather than stories." — Bruce Sterling
Examples of Diegetic Prototypes in Design Fiction. [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Feb 5, 2016 - 13 comments

The precogs were right

St. Louis turns to predictive policing software: "At a time when communities are crying out for justice," Crockford told me, "I never heard anyone in one of these communities say, ‘I think police need to use more computers!’"
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 3, 2016 - 25 comments

Raw Power: From Iggy and the Stooges to AMD and Blu-ray

The Leap: The Improbable Transformation of a Punk Pioneer (mp3) - "James Williamson is a successful tech executive who's been working in Silicon Valley for decades. But it turns out Williamson had a secret, something that no one working with him knew. He was a pioneer in a type of music that is about as far from the tech world as you can get." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jan 31, 2016 - 24 comments

Werner Herzog has made a documentary about AI and technology

Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World - "With interviewees ranging from Elon Musk to a gaming addict, Werner Herzog presents the web in all its wildness and utopian potential in this dizzying documentary." (via)
posted by kliuless on Jan 26, 2016 - 25 comments

Looking Back on Romer (1990)

25 years ago, Paul M. Romer's oft-cited article: "Endogenous Technological Change" (pdf) was published in The Journal of Political Economy. In it, he tried to explain how technological progress and knowledge creation affected the dynamics of growth. Romer’s model (pdf) became the "primary engine that fueled a decade-long re-examination of long-term growth in economics." This past October, Dr. Romer posted 7 follow-up blog entries to his historic paper, in order to 'revisit the basics,' starting with: Nonrival Goods After 25 Years. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jan 25, 2016 - 5 comments

Grim Reapers

More U.S. military drones are crashing than ever... Driving the increase was a mysterious surge in mishaps involving the Air Force’s newest and most advanced “hunter-killer” drone, the Reaper, which has become the Pentagon’s favored weapon for conducting surveillance and airstrikes against the Islamic State, al-Qaeda and other militant groups. From the Washington Post, January 19, 2016.
posted by cenoxo on Jan 19, 2016 - 32 comments

UBI in NYT

It's Payback Time for Women - "Society is getting a free ride on our unrewarded contributions to the perpetuation of the human race." (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jan 11, 2016 - 79 comments

Magic+

Want a frozen pint of ice cream from your favorite artisanal creamery delivered by helicopter to your suite at the Burj Dubai at 11PM tonight? San Francisco startup Magic claims that they will arrange any request for $100 per hour, plus expenses.
posted by overeducated_alligator on Jan 6, 2016 - 97 comments

Happy New Year from the manufacturers of economic inequality

Venture capitalist Paul Graham starts 2016 with an essay on Economic Inequality
Since the 1970s, economic inequality in the US has increased dramatically. And in particular, the rich have gotten a lot richer. Some worry this is a sign the country is broken. I'm interested in the topic because I am a manufacturer of economic inequality. I've become an expert on how to increase economic inequality, and I've spent the past decade working hard to do it.
[more inside]
posted by nickrussell on Jan 3, 2016 - 88 comments

Memory, Law, and Recording

Sci-Fi Author (and Metafilter's own) Charlie Stross has an interesting thought experiment: Could you get to a technological society without the use of writing? And if so, what would that look like?
posted by The Whelk on Jan 3, 2016 - 58 comments

The Pirate Book

The Pirate Book: a digital zine about technology, media piracy, and international cultural exchange
posted by overeducated_alligator on Dec 28, 2015 - 4 comments

Are we fully in control of our technology?

A two-part essay by Joel Achenbach of the Washington Post on the growing unease among some technologists. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Dec 27, 2015 - 87 comments

The Blue Glow

There were times when we practically lived at the Shark Tank. We’d be there for two weeks, spending most of the time living in the catwalks above the ice. We’d have all of our computers, work area, and everything up there... The initial test of the RF system was frankly scary. We saw that this repeater was bigger than we had hoped it would be. So rather than a half dollar buried in the puck, we were starting to think this was going to be a puck-shaped piece of electronics painted black. And that was scary to us.
First-Hand Recollections of the development of the FoxTrax hockey puck tracking system
posted by mannequito on Dec 23, 2015 - 12 comments

As if we all have the same online experience

One day Harvard professor Latanya Sweeney googled herself with a reporter friend sitting next to her. An ad popped up inquiring about her arrest record. She had never been arrested. "It must be because you have one of those Black Names!" the friend said. "That's impossible," she replied, "Computers can't be racist." But then she started doing research. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Dec 22, 2015 - 60 comments

Twitter is a strong candidate.

At Marginal Revolution, Tyler Cowen and commenters are answering the question, "If you had the power to make civilization unlearn one technology or theory in use today, what would it be?" Leading candidates include nuclear weapons, cigarettes, the AK-47, and Twitter.
posted by Cash4Lead on Dec 21, 2015 - 209 comments

“How did we get from Kitty Hawk to here?”

Take Flight [New York Times] [Magazine] The year’s best actors lift off in a series of tributes to the ultimate Hollywood magic trick. To watch in virtual reality on your phone, download our app. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Dec 10, 2015 - 4 comments

Speak up, Stay Safe(r)

Feminist Frequency (the website created by pop culture critic and Gamergate scourge Anita Sarkeesian) has published a guide for protecting yourself against harassment in digital spaces.
posted by selfnoise on Dec 10, 2015 - 13 comments

The Beginning of the End of Big Government IT

The state of California just announced that the new technology underpinning its Child Welfare System [pdf] won't be the usual "IT Solution" bought up in one big lump to follow a 4000-page specification. Instead, it's going to be built as a series of smaller modular projects driven by user needs, drawing on agile methodologies, a wider range of vendors, and, wherever possible, open standards and open source software. The decision, made in collaboration with Code for America and the federal government, sets an important precedent for how governments on all levels can get past the pitfalls of the standard procurement model. [more inside]
posted by holgate on Dec 8, 2015 - 63 comments

The mystery of this year's tech toy and product development in Shenzhen

If you’ve been paying attention, you’ve seen the scooter before. It’s sort of a phenomenon.... It’s been on the Tonight Show, and showed up at the NBA Finals. Every time anyone uploads a video or picture of this scooter, the commenters all want to know two things: What’s that called, and where can I buy it? That’s where it gets weird.
Wired digs into the world of generic segways without handlebars, often called hoverboards, while NPR's Planet Money comes to a similar conclusion, and actually digs inside one of the two-wheeled machines (bonus: not their take-apart, but someone else's), both finding the Hovertrax Kickstarter and related video from 2013.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 3, 2015 - 68 comments

“...how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge...”

The Science of Life and Death in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein [The Public Domain Review] Professor Sharon Ruston surveys the scientific background to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, considering contemporary investigations into resuscitation, galvanism, and the possibility of states between life and death.
posted by Fizz on Dec 3, 2015 - 6 comments

"I'm Heading Out to the Black. Farewell, io9 and Gizmodo!"

Annalee Newitz (prev) is jumping ship for Ars Technica.
posted by valkane on Dec 1, 2015 - 38 comments

1 in 30 American Kids is Homeless. That's about 2.5 Million Children.

A College Guide for Homeless Students (by Resilience.org) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Nov 26, 2015 - 6 comments

Minimum Viable Planet

The inconveniences of daily life are not the significant problems.
The world that scrolls past you on Twitter is not the real world.
You cannot calibrate your sense of what’s valuable and necessary to the current fashions in your field.
Bret Victor: What can a technologist do about climate change?
posted by modernserf on Nov 24, 2015 - 17 comments

It spent all its money on whiskey and beer

Remember the prototype lunar rover that was believed to be scrapped but was recovered by a junkyard owner? It just failed to sell at auction, and could be yours if you have an amount of money more than $30000 burning a hole in your pocket.
posted by Artw on Nov 22, 2015 - 10 comments

Revealing the invisible library

Ever since the the Villa dei Papiri and its cache of at least 800 papyrus scrolls was discovered in Herculaneum in 1752, this potential treasure trove of information and insight into the classical world has fascinated scholars with what it could possibly contain. The difficulty has been in how to read them without destroying them. As John Seabrook describes for The New Yorker: "One scroll was peeled apart into many fragments; the other dried up and then, like a disaster in slow motion, split apart into more than three hundred pieces." Now, thanks to new imaging techniques, the contents of the scrolls could—slowly—be revealed.
posted by Athanassiel on Nov 17, 2015 - 20 comments

...like Xerxes whipping the sea for swallowing his shitty bridge.

Marcin Wichary writes (among other things) articles about crazy, complicated computer bugs and what they say about the world. Come to read about how a bug in Google's famous Pac-Man doodle led to all manner of chaos, stay to learn how a confluence of history, typography, and OS weirdness broke the Polish S (previously), or how a fluke of CSS unearthed a decades-old font. [more inside]
posted by Itaxpica on Nov 16, 2015 - 37 comments

Genegineering

Humans 2.0 - "With CRISPR, scientists can change, delete, and replace genes in any animal, including us. Working mostly with mice, researchers have already deployed the tool to correct the genetic errors responsible for sickle-cell anemia, muscular dystrophy, and the fundamental defect associated with cystic fibrosis. One group has replaced a mutation that causes cataracts; another has destroyed receptors that H.I.V. uses to infiltrate our immune system." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Nov 16, 2015 - 69 comments

We’re high above the atmosphere now talking about abstractions.

Pinboard's (and MeFi's own) Maciej Cegłowski live-tweets O'Reilly's Next:Economy conference.
posted by tonycpsu on Nov 15, 2015 - 23 comments

“What a pity it isn’t illegal.”

" Chinese emperors of the Tang Dynasty liked their ice cream a special way: Fermented buffalo or goat milk was heated, then thickened with flour and seasoned with camphor, which made it flake like snow. For good measure fragments of reptile brain were added, along with an eyeball or two." - "It Ought To Be Called Vice Cream" - Austerity Kitchen on the social and technological history of Ice Cream.
posted by The Whelk on Nov 14, 2015 - 17 comments

Faced with gaping moral and economic holes in society

Rewrite the rules to benefit everyone, not just the wealthy - "If there's one thing Joseph Stiglitz wants to say about inequality, it's that it has been a choice, not an unexpected, unfortunate economic outcome. That's unnerving, but it also means that citizens and politicians have the opportunity to fix the problem before it gets worse." (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Nov 11, 2015 - 112 comments

Sony to end production of Betamax

Sony has announced that it will stop its production of Betamax video tapes in March of next year. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Nov 10, 2015 - 85 comments

How First Nations kids built their own internet infrastructure

Three years ago, the people living in the Ochiichagwe'Babigo'Ining Ojibway Nation in Ontario would crowd in each other’s homes and outside the band office to access what little internet the community had. There was dial-up, there was expensive cellular data, and there was some service from an internet provider in a neighboring town; when the network went down, it would sometimes take weeks for a technician to come and fix the issue. The community’s kids—itching to get their gaming systems online and scroll through Facebook on their phones—weren’t having it. [more inside]
posted by sciatrix on Nov 9, 2015 - 8 comments

Who do you mean by we?

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari - "The book delivers on its madly ambitious subtitle by in fact managing to cover key moments in the developmental history of humankind from the emergence of Homo Sapiens to today's developments in genetic engineering." Also btw, check out Harari on the myths we need to survive, re: fact/value distinctions and their interrelationships.
posted by kliuless on Nov 8, 2015 - 7 comments

Desire Modification in the Attention Economy

The Future of (Post)Capitalism - "Paul Mason shows how, from the ashes of the recent financial crisis, we have the chance to create a more socially just and sustainable global economy." (previously; via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Nov 4, 2015 - 22 comments

End of the line for Chromebooks?

Google will be folding its Chrome operating system into Android, according to The Wall Street Journal and independently confirmed by The Verge. Google is denying this, according to The Guardian, saying it is "committed to Chrome OS and it is likely Android and Chrome OS will co-exist with tighter integration between the two for the foreseeable future". Chromebook-like small laptops running Android such as the Pixel C are not uncommon, though they tend to dual-purpose as tablets and be more expensive than machines running the browser based operating system.
posted by Artw on Oct 30, 2015 - 58 comments

Lessons From a Decade of IT Failures

To commemorate the last decade’s worth of failures, we organized and analyzed the data we’ve collected. We cannot claim—nor can anyone, really—to have a definitive, comprehensive database of debacles. Instead, from the incidents we have chronicled, we handpicked the most interesting and illustrative examples of big IT systems and projects gone awry and created the five interactives featured here. Each reveals different emerging patterns and lessons. Dive in to see what we’ve found. One big takeaway: While it’s impossible to say whether IT failures are more frequent now than in the past, it does seem that the aggregate consequences are worse. [more inside]
posted by jenkinsEar on Oct 27, 2015 - 62 comments

"Whiz kids need geezers."

Medium's Steven Levy asks for ideas on how to end age discrimination in tech companies. Readers respond. [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Oct 26, 2015 - 65 comments

Can an iPad run Drug Wars? Oh... it can?

The TI-83 graphic calculator is still a standby for mathematics education in America. This Mic.com article looks at some of the causes and effects of that fact. [more inside]
posted by codacorolla on Oct 18, 2015 - 99 comments

The Smartest Building in the World

Inside the connected future of architecture.
posted by ellieBOA on Oct 6, 2015 - 32 comments

Facebook is just going to do whatever the f— it wants to me. And to you.

Violet Blue, a technology journalist and sex blogger, describes how she has been locked out of her Facebook account and cannot access it without providing a government ID.
Last weekend, as I sat locked out of my Facebook account ‘for security reasons’ (and you tagged me in something, not knowing I can’t respond), my friend’s boss Mark Zuckerberg spoke at the United Nations. He talked about plans to expand Facebook use into refugee camps, and made no pretensions about how this would be used to benefit his company. I personally know what this will do. [...] De-anonymizing refugees usually precedes murder on a grand scale.
[more inside] posted by Rangi on Oct 3, 2015 - 118 comments

Common Peeple

Everyone you know will be able to rate you on the terrifying ‘Yelp for people’ — whether you want them to or not
posted by Artw on Sep 30, 2015 - 623 comments

I Presume You Mean Computers And So Forth?

"I found this collection of outtakes in my archive. I shot these interviews on the streets of New York in the late 70s when I was doing a documentary on the coming of the information age." - Man on the street interviews with New Yorkers in 1979 about science, technology, corporate influence, computers, and paperwork. (SLYT 5:45)
posted by The Whelk on Sep 23, 2015 - 17 comments

I am Fundi

"I Am Fundi" is a short documentary depicting the education system in Uganda and the measures that the organization, Fundibots, is taking to create change. Victor, a Fundi teacher with a challenging past, is changing the future of Uganda by preparing and instilling excitement for science in young children so that when they grow, they will be confident, supported, and prepared for contemporary practices and technological advances.
via
posted by infini on Sep 22, 2015 - 1 comment

"We Own You"

Confessions of an Anonymous Free to Play Producer
posted by Artw on Sep 17, 2015 - 48 comments

The Future of Food

A short series from the Guardian.
What we eat
How we eat it
How we grow it
How we cook it
How we share it

posted by ellieBOA on Sep 16, 2015 - 8 comments

"I’m Sarah Nyberg, and I Was A Teenage Edgelord."

"​I got out, and it’s not too late for you." - Sarah Nyberg on being the subject of an online hate mob. Meanwhile Zoe Quinn talks about sympathy for her abusers, and actions turned out to have consequences for internet troll Joshua Goldberg.
posted by Artw on Sep 14, 2015 - 244 comments

The battle between academia and business for research talent

Uber would like to buy your robotics department Today’s early-stage inquiry — so-called basic research, the Level 1 work, where scientists are still puzzling over fundamental questions — is financed almost exclusively by the federal government. It’s too far out, too speculative, to attract much investment; it isn’t clear if anyone will make any money on it. This wasn’t always the case.
posted by modernnomad on Sep 11, 2015 - 27 comments

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