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23 posts tagged with tehran.
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jaunty jackets register at the Shah Abbas

GQ’s Persian Excursion, 1969
posted by timshel on Nov 6, 2014 - 7 comments

Tehran Times - Iranian Street Style Blog

Carry cash, take the metro and always look at people's feet – Araz Fazaeli, who lives in Paris but runs the street style blog Tehran Times with a team in Iran, offers his tips about how to make the most of the capital.
posted by KokuRyu on Mar 11, 2014 - 18 comments

Dom's laptop is in Iran.

It's still there. A tale of loss.
posted by colie on Apr 11, 2013 - 49 comments

A New Kinda Satellite State

The satellite man is typically young, with an entrepreneur’s zeal and a sense of adventure, often from the mercantile district of South Tehran, trained by colleagues in the black-market niche of satellite TV installation...
posted by Chipmazing on Sep 30, 2012 - 11 comments

Subway Surprise, Tehran

"Things didn’t happen as I imagined. On the one hand, with the situation in Tehran, I expected the police to arrest me. I also thought that the resulting dress wouldn’t be aesthetically pleasing to the eye. But it turned out to be more homogenous than I envisaged. Most of the passengers wanted to communicate with me and participate in the project. And I enjoyed this attention and collaboration. The point wasn’t their understanding of the project. I didn’t want anything to be imposed on the audience or participants. I wanted ordinary people to encounter their own personalities without any preconceptions about contemporary art. More than anything, I wanted something to emerge that is shared — between me and everyday metro passengers." The story of fashion student Shirin Abedinirad who conceived and carried out an unusual (and unusually bold) performance art experiment by asking Tehran metro passengers to donate their rubbish to pin on her dress. [more inside]
posted by taz on Nov 16, 2011 - 10 comments

Misreading Tehran

Misreading Tehran: Leading Iranian-American writers revisit a year of dreams and discouragement. "With a full 12 months now between us and the election, the time is ripe to start revisiting the hype and hope in a year of writing: which stories were overblown, what stories were missed entirely, and what can be gleaned about Iran's annus horribilis from a more thorough understanding. FP asked seven prominent Iranian-Americans, deeply immersed in both the English- and Persian-language media, to look through the fog of journalism at what actually happened in Tehran -- and why so many of us got it so wrong." [Via]
posted by homunculus on Jun 8, 2010 - 29 comments

For Neda

For Neda. "For Neda reveals the true story of Neda Agha-Soltan, who became another tragic casualty of Iran's violent crackdown on post-election protests on June 20, 2009. Unlike many unknown victims, however, she instantly became an international symbol of the struggle: Within hours of Agha-Soltan's death, cell phone photographs of her blood-stained face were held aloft by crowds protesting in Tehran and across the world. With exclusive access to her family inside Iran, the documentary goes to the heart of who Neda was and what she stood for, illuminating the larger Iranian struggle for democratic freedoms through her powerful story." [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Jun 4, 2010 - 7 comments

The Regime Reels

Kosoof—Arash Ashoorinia's Photography —including today's Ashura protests in Iran. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Dec 27, 2009 - 19 comments

Watch Laleh Seddigh's dust

"I like competition in everything ... I have to move whatever is movable in the world." Say hello to Laleh Seddigh, Iran's top rated female race car driver. [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Jul 9, 2009 - 23 comments

The Tragic Face of the Iranian Revolution

Disturbing video of a young Iranian woman shot and dying in the streets of Tehran has surfaced on the internet (extremely graphic, NSFW, requires youtube login). Known only as "Neda" in the video, she has been identified by subsequent reports as a 16-year-old student named Neda Soltani. Supporters of the Iranian opposition are saying that she is the face of the struggle, and that this video galvanizes the opposition movement. As of this writing, the authenticity of the video has not been conclusively determined, and a small but vocal minority on the internet are decrying it as a fake.
posted by orville sash on Jun 21, 2009 - 233 comments

A View from Iran

A view from Iran: Golboo Fiuzi, a young resident of Tehran, talks to fellow Iranian citizens about why they think the US hasn't attacked yet, their political views, opinions about globalization and their lives under UN imposed sanctions.
posted by Surfin' Bird on Oct 20, 2008 - 24 comments

Generation Tehran

Generation Tehran A documentary short about the youth of Iran.
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Oct 5, 2008 - 8 comments

Iran Graffiti and Urban Art Report

Iran Graffiti and Urban Art Report
posted by carsonb on Jun 15, 2007 - 9 comments

Hamid Dabashi shows how the cover of 'Reading Lolita in Tehran' symbolises the way anti-Iranian propaganda is formed in the U.S. works

The cover of 'Reading Lolita in Tehran' symbolises the way anti-Iranian propaganda in the U.S. works:
The original picture from which this cover is excised is lifted off a news report during the parliamentary election of February 2000 in Iran. In the original picture, the two young women are in fact reading the leading reformist newspaper Mosharekat. Azar Nafisi and her publisher may have thought that the world is not looking, and that they can distort the history of a people any way they wish. But the original picture from which this cover steals its idea speaks to the fact of this falsehood.

The cover of Reading Lolita in Tehran is an iconic burglary from the press, distorted and staged in a frame for an entirely different purpose than when it was taken. In its distorted form and framing, the picture is cropped so we no longer see the newspaper that the two young female students are holding in their hands, thus creating the illusion that they are "Reading Lolita"--with the scarves of the two teenagers doing the task of "in Tehran." In the original picture the two young students are obviously on a college campus, reading a newspaper that is reporting the latest results of a major parliamentary election in their country. Cropping the newspaper, their classmates behind them, and a perfectly visible photograph of President Khatami--the iconic representation of the reformist movement--out of the picture and suggesting that the two young women are reading "Lolita" strips them of their moral intelligence and their participation in the democratic aspirations of their homeland, ushering them into a colonial harem.
Read Hamid Dabashi's full essay 'Native informers and the making of the American empire.'
posted by hoder on Feb 22, 2007 - 67 comments

BBC's documentary: Iran, the most understood country, by Rageh Omaar

Watch BBC's documentary: Iran, the least understood country (Google video | Torrent) Rageh Omaar discovers that Iran is a country that bans women from riding motorcycles but where 60 per cent of the student population is female. There are stories of taxi drivers, wrestlers, business women, people working with drug addicts and the country's leading pop star and his manager - the 'Simon Cowell' of Iran. Read his article in the Sunday Times.
posted by hoder on Feb 19, 2007 - 30 comments

Baztab, Tehran-based news website in English

Baztab, an alternative Iranian news wesbite from Tehran, (feed) was launched last month. But last week, it defied Ahmadinejad's government's order to shut down its service.
posted by hoder on Feb 18, 2007 - 13 comments

Artworks produced under Islamic Republic of Iran

These artworks are produced under the Islamic Republic of Iran, by young artists educated in Iran's current numerous art schools. (Click on each to see a set of photos.) Do they need to be liberated by Bush and Cheney?
posted by hoder on Feb 15, 2007 - 44 comments

This Iranian American Life

This Iranian American Life "This blog is for an experimental documentary that I am working on this year, where I will be shooting video of my experiences in Iran and creating shorts, interactive installations, and/or videoblogs using the footage from my experiences and the experiences of others."

Iranian-American student Paris Marashi has gone back to Tehran with the goal of documenting her own experiences with family, friends, and about town. She's also giving inexpensive cameras to Iranians to help them document their own experiences. There are only a few posts up at the moment, but it should be stay interesting as time goes on.
posted by chasing on Aug 8, 2006 - 15 comments

Halliburton's busniess dealings in Iran

Halliburton's business dealings in Iran: Waxman’s and Thompson’s complaints revolve around a Halliburton subsidiary called Halliburton Products and Services, which is based in Dubai and registered in the Cayman Islands, a tax haven in the Caribbean. As the Financial Times first reported, the subsidiary opened an office in Tehran in February 2000, when Cheney was still CEO of Halliburton. The subsidiary has sold $40 million worth of oil services in Iran.
Thompson, who is acting on behalf of the city’s pension funds, has asked Halliburton for clarifications about its business dealings in Iran, a country listed by the American government as a sponsor of terrorism and thus subject to stringent U.S. trade sanctions. Thompson claims that Halliburton has been using its subsidiary to circumvent a 1995 executive order barring American companies from doing business with Tehran.
posted by hoder on Jul 7, 2004 - 5 comments

Pictures from the First Weblog Festival in Tehran, Iran

Pictures from the First Weblog Festival in Tehran, Iran, in which the deputy of the Ministery of Information Technology wished that every Iranian could have a weblog. While western media has not covered it yet, there are many reports about it in Persian news agencies.
posted by hoder on Jun 11, 2004 - 9 comments

cost of living in Tehran

How much is the cost of living in Tehran, Iran? Also look at some other vital statistics about the non-Arab country.
posted by hoder on Feb 18, 2004 - 17 comments

Iran considers moving capital away from Tehran

Iran considers moving capital away from Tehran. Tehran lies on a major seismological fault and experts have long warned that a strong earthquake in the city would be devastating. A professor of geophysics at Tehran university, has warned that if a quake of similar magnitude hit Tehran it would kill more than 700,000 people. Government buildings would be destroyed.
posted by hoder on Jan 5, 2004 - 14 comments

Nail. Head. Hit it. He did.

Nail. Head. Hit it. He did. "Despite almost universal condemnation of the attacks, many argue that a misguided US foreign policy in the Middle East is at least partly to blame. The BBC's Tehran Correspondent Jim Muir, who has spent decades covering conflicts in the region explains the forces at work."
posted by Jofus on Sep 20, 2001 - 81 comments

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