145 posts tagged with theatlantic.
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Great journalism. Lots of it.

Slightly more than 100 exceptional works of journalism.
posted by mudpuppie on Aug 11, 2016 - 8 comments

The Return of American Hunger

"...in one of the richest countries that has ever existed, about 15 percent of the population faces down bare cupboards and empty refrigerators on a routine basis." (slTheAtlantic)
posted by Kitteh on Jul 20, 2016 - 25 comments

“I just point at things,”

Every Episode of David Attenborough’s Life Series, Ranked [The Atlantic] This Sunday, Sir David Attenborough, naturalist, maker of wildlife documentaries, snuggler of gorillas, wielder of That Voice, keeper of the blue shirt, and Most Trusted Man in Britain, turns 90. To mark the occasion, and celebrate his unbeatable oeuvre, I re-watched all 79 episodes of his Life Collection, and ranked them from worst to best—or, really, from least great to greatest.
posted by Fizz on May 7, 2016 - 18 comments

The Secret Shame of Middle-Class Americans

Nearly half of Americans would have trouble finding $400 to pay for an emergency. I’m one of them. An essay on "Financial impotence" from Neal Gabler in The Atlantic, part of a longer project on "Financial shame": True Money Stories
posted by chavenet on Apr 19, 2016 - 191 comments

Luck is not something you can mention in the presence of self-made men.

Robert H. Frank, professor of economics at Cornell University, for The Atlantic: Why Luck Matters More Than You Might Think. "...the luckiest among us appear especially unlikely to appreciate our good fortune. According to the Pew Research Center, people in higher income brackets are much more likely than those with lower incomes to say that individuals get rich primarily because they work hard. Other surveys bear this out: Wealthy people overwhelmingly attribute their own success to hard work rather than to factors like luck or being in the right place at the right time." [more inside]
posted by amnesia and magnets on Apr 15, 2016 - 114 comments

How to market a budding industry

Pot businesses are, above all, businesses, and they’re responding as businesses do: with marketing aimed at convincing longtime pot users that their brand is better than the others—and, just as important, at increasing demand by encouraging curious nonusers to try their product first. --The Art of Marketing Marijuana [SLTheAtlantic]
posted by MoonOrb on Mar 16, 2016 - 50 comments

Nina Simone's Face

Ta-Nehisi Coates on the trouble with the upcoming Nina Simone biopic: "Simone was able to conjure glamour in spite of everything the world said about black women who looked like her. And for that she enjoyed a special place in the pantheon of resistance. That fact doesn’t just have to do with her lyrics or her musicianship, but also how she looked." [more inside]
posted by Kitteh on Mar 16, 2016 - 69 comments

The Miscarriage Taboo

From The Atlantic: A culture of silence can make it even harder for women to make sense of losing a pregnancy.
posted by MoonOrb on Mar 2, 2016 - 21 comments

"Nope, he's Laotian, aint ya Mr. Kahn?"

"Liberals generally love quirky comedies like Community, Parks and Recreation, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and The Mindy Project; conservatives tend to prefer reality shows and crime dramas including NCIS, Duck Dynasty, The Bachelor, and Top Gear. But for 13 years there was a show that drew laughs from viewers of all political persuasions." King of the Hill: The Last Bipartisan TV Comedy (SLAtlantic)
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Feb 24, 2016 - 129 comments

Debtor's Prison in 21st Century America

Historically, the phrase debtors’ prison refers to any detention facility in which people are incarcerated for their failure to pay a debt. Today, the “debts” that lead to incarceration take the form of monetary penalties established and enforced by municipal courts. (slTheAtlantic)
posted by Kitteh on Feb 23, 2016 - 18 comments

Seattle's Experiment with Campaign Finance Reform

Starting in 2017, city residents will be able to contribute to local candidates without spending a dime of their own money. Instead, the government will send each registered voter four $25 vouchers that they can give to candidates of their choice. No cutting a check. No minimum contribution. Candidates can opt out, but those who participate will have to abide by strict limits on spending and on receiving private donations. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 11, 2016 - 20 comments

Venus Flytraps Are Even Creepier Than We Thought

When it comes to digesting its prey, the plant is a calculating killer.
posted by ellieBOA on Jan 23, 2016 - 13 comments

All Hollowed Out

The lonely poverty of America's white working class. (slAtlantic)
posted by Kitteh on Jan 18, 2016 - 73 comments

Standing at Armageddon and Battling for the Lord

They aren’t necessarily superconservative. They often don’t think in ideological terms at all. But they do strongly feel that life in this country used to be better for people like them—and they want that older country back. The Great Republican Revolt: from the pages of The Atlantic, David Frum explains how current state of the Republican Party, explains the different factions and movements within the GOP, and lays out four possible options for the future. [more inside]
posted by Apocryphon on Dec 22, 2015 - 92 comments

“...things get broken, and sometimes they get repaired,”

Debate erupts as Hanya Yanagihara's editor takes on critic over bad review of A Little Life. [The Guardian] The editor of Hanya Yanagihara’s bestselling novel A Little Life has taken to the pages of the New York Review of Books to defend his author from a review that claimed the novel “duped” its readers “into confusing anguish and ecstasy, pleasure and pain”. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Dec 4, 2015 - 30 comments

#rogeliomybrogelio

"Jane the Virgin is doing some of the most serious, most valuable work I’ve seen in a long time, and that work is rooted in a radically frank depiction of new motherhood." Links may contain spoilers, but also this show is very silly so knowing some things that happen will probably not ruin your enjoyment of the rest of it [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Nov 24, 2015 - 17 comments

"the TV set in my head was running constantly, never turning off."

When Daydreaming Replaces Real Life [more inside]
posted by holmesian on Nov 5, 2015 - 60 comments

“Everyone calls us the Crook Islands now,” he said.

I was lucky that he merely threatened me. A journalist from Newsweek actually was deported from a different tax-haven island (Jersey) for her reporting there, and was banned from re-entering the island, or any part of the U.K., for nearly two years. Even though her story was unrelated to the financial-services industry, it was expected to bring negative publicity to the island, threatening its reputation as a place to do business. The message was therefore quashed by banishment of the messenger. The wealth-management industry does not mess around. Inside the Secretive World of Tax-Avoidance Experts.
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Oct 29, 2015 - 25 comments

Frankly, you sound a little paranoid

If someone had told me even a few years ago that such a thing wasn’t pure coincidence, I would have had my doubts about that someone. Now, however, I reserve my doubts for the people who still trust. There are so many ghosts in our machines—their locations so hidden, their methods so ingenious, their motives so inscrutable—that not to feel haunted is not to be awake. That’s why paranoia, even in its extreme forms, no longer seems to me so much a disorder as a mode of cognition with an impressive track record of prescience. --Walter Kirn on modern paranoia in The Atlantic [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Oct 14, 2015 - 33 comments

“I’d rather that everyone… could just stay obscure”

[T]here are immediate practical benefits to trolling. The way we’ve designed the Internet has made the old cliché “There’s no such thing as bad publicity” actually come true. It’s now possible to monetize any kind of attention, good or bad—and if your gift happens to be generating the bad kind of attention, then it’s well within reach to make trolling into a full-time career.
Arthur Chu writes about “The Big Business of Internet Bigotry” for The Daily Beast.
posted by Going To Maine on Oct 2, 2015 - 81 comments

“Everyone says Hufflepuff are a lot o’ duffers.”

In Defense of Hufflepuff [The Atlantic] The much-maligned house of the Harry Potter series doesn’t get nearly enough attention or praise for its egalitarian ethos. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 21, 2015 - 142 comments

Hit Charade

"The biggest pop star in America today is a man named Karl Martin Sandberg. The lead singer of an obscure ’80s glam-metal band, Sandberg grew up in a remote suburb of Stockholm and is now 44. Sandberg is the George Lucas, the LeBron James, the Serena Williams of American pop. He is responsible for more hits than Phil Spector, Michael Jackson, or the Beatles." [more inside]
posted by p3on on Sep 18, 2015 - 154 comments

One doesnt build a safety net for a race of predators. One builds a cage

In his latest essay for The Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates (previously) examines "The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration." [more inside]
posted by DynamiteToast on Sep 14, 2015 - 37 comments

The Danger of Being Neighborly Without a Permit

All over America, people have put small "give one, take one" book exchanges in front of their homes. Then they were told to tear them down.
posted by standardasparagus on Aug 24, 2015 - 60 comments

mitti attar: earth's perfume

"Along with their ancient perfumery, the villagers of Kannauj have inherited a remarkable skill: They can capture the scent of rain." [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Aug 18, 2015 - 43 comments

I guess it's not just me...

It might not be because you're introverted, or because they probably don't give you cancer. Maybe mobile phones just suck. (Hint: Because they sound horrible.) [more inside]
posted by prismatic7 on Aug 13, 2015 - 60 comments

The promise and the peril of the exoskeleton.

"The tension, the promise, and the peril of the exoskeleton: It is great for some, but in the gusto for technological solutions, for stories that “inspire” and for devices that pull people into the “normal” world, people can lose sight of a future that could be much better. " Rose Eveleth at The Atlantic writes about exoskeletons and other forms of assistive technology for people with disabilities, the life-changing things they can do, and the possibility that they are blinding us to other ways to look at disability, accessibility, and infrastructure. This is part of Remaking the Bodies, a series on how science and technology are re-engineering the human body.
posted by Stacey on Aug 7, 2015 - 37 comments

"I’ll be 25. I can’t rent my first car as a virgin. They’ll know."

The Atlantic: On "Late"-in-Life Virginity Loss. Vice's predictably Vice-ier take. Meanwhile, Dr. Nerdlove and Gawker's After Hours have advice. [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Aug 6, 2015 - 15 comments

In conventional camera terms, it’s a 75mm lens at f/8.7

A story in the Atlantic about "Ralph", the camera taking the tan-and-sepia-toned high-resolution photos of Pluto.

Because different materials shrink at different rates, “We actually built the mirrors and the chassis out of aluminum so that as they shrink, they would shrink together, to maintain the same focal length."
posted by artsandsci on Jul 15, 2015 - 7 comments

It’s the anti-‘I Kissed a Girl,’ which is a good thing.

"Lovato's song, on the other hand, is all about desire. She wants the girl because she wants the girl. Her perspective is that of a newbie, but that doesn’t make her a tourist; when she says 'Even if they judge / Fuck it,' she's going through the same process most every queer person has had to go through. Mostly, though, the song is about pop music's favorite topic: being attracted to someone hot." Demi Lovato's 'Cool for the Summer': The Next Great Gay Anthem?, Spencer Kornhaber for The Atlantic [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 14, 2015 - 36 comments

1 in 25 female inmates is pregnant when the prison doors lock behind her

Prison Born. What becomes of babies born to mothers behind bars? Research suggests that having nurseries in prisons leads to lower recidivism rates among incarcerated mothers and better outcomes for their children.
posted by blue_beetle on Jun 22, 2015 - 15 comments

The Startup That Wants to Cure Social Anxiety

Joyable’s website, full of affable sans serifs and cheery salmon rectangles, looks Pinterest-esque, at least in its design. Except its text didn’t discuss eye glasses or home decor but “evidence-based” methods shown to reduce social anxiety. I knew those phrases: “Evidence-based” is the watchword of cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, the treatment now considered most effective for certain anxiety disorders. Joyable dresses a psychologists’s pitch in a Bay Area startup’s clothes.
posted by ellieBOA on May 18, 2015 - 47 comments

The Wedding Sting

After months of undercover work, Williams and Moon had information on more than 40 suspects, but the department realized it didn’t have the funds or the manpower to round them all up. So it had to come up with clever ideas. “Cops used to offer parolees free tickets to the Detroit Lions, then arrest them,” recalls Peggy Lawrence, a Flint historian. On one occasion, Moon quietly arrested and locked up stolen property dealer, announced his death in the newspaper, and arrested gang members who showed up at his fake funeral. “Sometimes you gotta do things that are simply funny,” Moon later told a television reporter. “People gotta go to jail, but it don’t always have to be sad.” In 1990, the department planned a particularly elaborate operation: Officers would throw a fake wedding, invite all the suspects, and arrest them.
posted by ellieBOA on May 15, 2015 - 33 comments

Marie Kondo, Tidying, and Behavioral Economics

In The Atlantic, economist Bourree Lam looks at how Marie Kondo's bestselling tidying book reflects the principles of behavioral economics. Marie Kondo previously on Metafilter. AskMe collects great advice from members on how to do KonMari.
posted by matildaben on May 13, 2015 - 42 comments

A 1690s advice column

A 1690s advice column
posted by deathpanels on May 7, 2015 - 51 comments

"May the ox of journalism always be yoked to the cart of commerce."

The Onion Is Not a Joke [The Atlantic] How a fake newspaper is turning into a real media empire.
posted by Fizz on May 3, 2015 - 16 comments

<+]:¬)

Will Pope Francis Break the Church? [The Atlantic]
“Told this way—conservative Jesuit fights post–Vatican II radicalization, finds himself shunned by left-wing confreres, gets rescued by a John Paul appointee—the story of Francis’s rise and fall and rise sounds for all the world like The Making of a Conservative Pope. And indeed, a number of Catholic writers greeted Bergoglio’s election—some optimistically, some despairingly—with exactly that interpretation of his past’s likely impact on his papacy. But it seems fair to say that this interpretation was mistaken. So how, exactly, did the man who fought bitterly with left-wing Jesuits in the 1970s become the darling of progressive Catholics in the 2010s?”
Previously. Previously.
posted by Fizz on Apr 22, 2015 - 23 comments

The Upwardly Mobile Barista

When it comes to college, the central challenge for most Americans in the 21st century is not going; it’s finishing. Thirty-five million Americans now have some college experience but no degree. Amanda Ripley in The Atlantic follows a group of Starbucks employees taking advantage of the corporation's partnership with Arizona State University, and discovers some of the reasons why so few low-income students graduate on time, or ever get a degree at all. The Upwardly Mobile Barista.
posted by suelac on Apr 22, 2015 - 26 comments

Bank of the Underworld

Liberty Reserve was like PayPal for the unbanked. Was it also a global money-laundering operation? By Jake Halpern at The Atlantic (previously).
posted by valkane on Apr 20, 2015 - 3 comments

"...clinical-sounding terms like adipose, overweight, and obese."

How Obesity Became a Disease [The Atlantic] And, as a consequence, how weight loss became an industry.
posted by Fizz on Mar 24, 2015 - 66 comments

The Myth of the Gay Community

"I am the gay community that many people think of, that gets to have its voice heard, who considers the prospect of marriage. But it certainly doesn’t end with me." (SL Atlantic)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jan 30, 2015 - 19 comments

“Wasn’t anything we could do about it.”

How White Flight Destroyed the Mississippi Delta (SL longform Atlantic)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jan 6, 2015 - 49 comments

The Benefits of Being Cold

The notion that thermal environments influence human metabolism dates back to studies conducted in the late 18th century by the French chemist Antoine Lavoisier, but only in the past century has it really become relevant to daily life. Cronise believes that our thinking about the modern plagues of obesity and metabolic disease (like diabetes) has not addressed the fact that most people are rarely cold today. Many of us live almost constantly, year-round, in 70-something-degree environments. And when we are caught somewhere colder than that, most of us quickly put on a sweater or turn up the thermostat.
posted by Librarypt on Dec 30, 2014 - 70 comments

It's beginning to smell a lot like Mongolian beef

io9 tells us that Chinese food on Christmas is no longer just a Jewish tradition and digs up an ethnographic article examining the birth of the customary meal: Chinese food is unkosher and therefore non-Jewish. But because of the specific ways that Chinese food is prepared and served, immigrant Jews and their children found Chinese food to be more attractive and less threatening than other non-Jewish or treyf food. Chinese food was what we term "safe treyf." [more inside]
posted by bq on Dec 25, 2014 - 34 comments

We like to think that we understand our universe.

The Uncanny Power of Weird Fiction, by Jeff VanderMeer in The Atlantic.
posted by Sticherbeast on Nov 4, 2014 - 39 comments

To Raise, Love, and Lose a Black Child

Jordan Davis's mother, Lucia McBath, reflects on the guilty verdict in his murderer's trial. by Ta-Nehisi Coates (SLAtlantic) [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 8, 2014 - 18 comments

30 years of Coens

"In honor of the 30th anniversary of the Coen brothers' debut, Blood Simple, I’m re-watching their 16 feature films and attempting to jot down observations on one per day, in order of their release. For a fuller explanation of what I’m doing and why, see my first entry, on Blood Simple. (Here, too, are my entries on Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing, Barton Fink, The Hudsucker Proxy, Fargo, The Big Lebowski, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Man Who Wasn’t There, Intolerable Cruelty, The Ladykillers, No Country For Old Men, Burn After Reading, A Serious Man, True Grit and Inside Llewyn Davis." -- Christopher Orr, writing in The Atlantic.
posted by ricochet biscuit on Sep 29, 2014 - 84 comments

Have a Guinness (Latte) when you're tired

Starbucks Is Testing a Drink That Tastes Like Guinness (Without the Alcohol) by Samantha Grossman (@sam_grossman), Time magazine:
The new drink, called the Dark Barrel Latte, is being tested at select locations across Ohio and Florida, Grubstreet reports. It doesn't contain any alcohol, but it supposedly contains the dark, toasty, malty flavors of Guinness. A BuzzFeed writer who got his hands on one in Columbus confirmed that it really does taste like stout. Several customers who've tweeted about the drink agree that it tastes like Guinness — but the jury's still out on whether or not that’s actually a good thing.

When I asked a colleague who was born and raised in Dublin (Guinness's birthplace) how he felt about all this, he responded first with this GIF. Then, as he mulled it over a bit more, he added, "Holy hell. Worst." Then he posed a question: "American Guinness already doesn't taste like Guinness. So what will this taste like?" Then he barfed all over me and my stupid American ignorance.
[more inside] posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Sep 23, 2014 - 170 comments

the sea is a cup of death and the land is a stained altar stone

I don't know what it is about fecundity that so appalls. I suppose it is the teeming evidence that birth and growth, which we value, are ubiquitous and blind, that life itself is so astonishingly cheap, that nature is as careless as it is bountiful, and that with extravagance goes a crushing waste that will one day include our own cheap lives. Every glistening egg is a memento mori.
Annie Dillard ponders the disquieting thrall of the circle of life in her November 1973 essay for The Atlantic: The Force That Drives the Flower. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Sep 11, 2014 - 15 comments

Redder and redder, and prettier and prettier.

The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious: How the worst apple took over the United States, and continues to spread.
posted by Faint of Butt on Sep 10, 2014 - 324 comments

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