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That’s the best thing. Do what you feel.

Mavis Staples speaks about "The Weight" in "The Last Waltz." Elon Green asks Mavis Staples about her memories of the Staple Singers' unforgettable collaboration with The Band, captured on film in Martin Scorsese's "The Last Waltz." [more inside]
posted by Sheydem-tants on Jun 18, 2014 - 19 comments

Ever wonder what "The Last Waltz" sounded like

before Robbie Roberston got his filthy paws on it and overdubbed the hell out of it? Now you can hear it, untouched, in order, as it was played. [more inside]
posted by old_growler on May 25, 2014 - 36 comments

AAAAAAND!!!...

Jimmy Fallon signs off The Late Show with an homage to The Last Waltz (SLYT). With Muppets. Lots of Muppets. (Past awesome Late Show musical numbers: previously and previously and previously but that's really just a start.)
posted by dry white toast on Feb 10, 2014 - 56 comments

People got their money's worth that night!

Here's the entire show (audio only) from Landover, Maryland, January 15, 1974, by Bob Dylan and The Band.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Aug 16, 2013 - 11 comments

Take a load off

"I've found myself wondering lately, out of all of these songs - and many others - why has "The Weight" emerged as the iconic American standard? Why is this the mood-setting song in Easy Rider? Why is this the song that 22 year-olds still put on when they start their first road trips across the country? Why, since Levon Helm's passing nearly a year ago, do Americana musicians overwhelmingly close their shows with "The Weight"? Why did the GRAMMY Awards choose "The Weight" as its group sing-along for the musicians we lost this year - and why was it the only performance of the night that had everyone in the audience singing and dancing?"
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 21, 2013 - 247 comments

Classic Albums, covering 3 decades of popular music

Classic Albums is a rock and pop documentary series, broadcast and on DVD, starting with The Making of Sgt. Pepper. There were 38 more albums covered, plus five more in the Netherlands... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 1, 2013 - 33 comments

one of the greats will be leaving the stage

The Band singer and drummer Levon Helm is in the final stages of cancer, according to a note posted on his website Tuesday by his wife, Sandy, and daughter, Amy. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 17, 2012 - 137 comments

Mavis Staples, Nick Lowe, and Wilco - "The Weight"

Wilco, Nick Lowe, and Mavis Staples rehearse "The Weight" backstage at the Civic Opera House in Chicago in December 2011.
posted by nadawi on Jan 11, 2012 - 69 comments

Bobby Charles, Singer, Songwriter, National Treasure 1938-2010

Bobby Charles 1938-2010. Songwriter, musician's musician and cultural treasure, he died on last Thursday in Abbeville,Lousiana. In the 1950s, he wrote Fats Domino's Walking to New Orleans, Bill Haley and the Comet's See You Later, Alligator and recorded for Chess records. His eponymous Bearsville album recorded in Woodstock in 1972 has been described as the best Band album released under another name.(Check out Small Town Talk there.) He appeared as well in the Band's farewell concert filmed as The Last Waltz. He made an enormous contribution to American popular music. [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Jan 19, 2010 - 25 comments

Son of a Carpenter

A forgotten gem from The Band, and a Christmas Card to all my fellow MeFites.
posted by timsteil on Dec 24, 2009 - 10 comments

Music to cook your turkey to...

Thanksgiving. you know what that means. But this year, Arlo's got some competition from The Band. Scorsese's film 'The Last Waltz' chronicled their final show at the Winterland (1976-11-25). We've discussed the movie, and the album before, but that wasn't the half of it! The whole show was more than 4 hours, and thanks once again to wonderful guys at Wolfgang's Vault we can now listen to the whole damn show!
posted by mikelieman on Nov 24, 2009 - 28 comments

Who do you love?

It started in 1956 and led in 1969 to Quicksilver Messenger Service recording the song as an entire side on the Happy Trails album. This song was later to be covered by The Doors (1970); The Band + Ronnie Hawkins (1976); George Thorogood (1978) among many. The second side also featured a composition by the same writer; performing here with Tom Petty. Hey Bo Diddley
posted by adamvasco on Oct 26, 2008 - 23 comments

A well-done "The Band" fan site

The Band is one of the more user-friendly fan sites I have come across. What I appreciate most is the (unadvertised) chord charts. They are not always right but they are often not wrong. Subtle, theatrical chromaticism, your name is Mozart Robbie Robertson.
posted by St Urbain's Horseman on Oct 26, 2007 - 16 comments

"We gave our final concert, The Band's final concert. We called it The Last Waltz."

At San Francisco's Winterland Ballroom on Thanksgiving 1976, The Band served turkey dinners to an audience of 5,000 and played Don't Do It, Theme from The Last Waltz, Up on Cripple Creek, The Shape I'm In, Who Do You Love, It Makes No Difference, Such a Night, Helpless, Stage Fright, The Weight, The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, Dry Your Eyes, Coyote, Mystery Train, Mannish Boy, Further on up the Road, Evangeline, Ophelia, Caravan, Forever Young, Baby Let Me Follow You Down, and I Shall Be Released with a ton of guests (listed in link titles). [more inside]
posted by kirkaracha on Oct 8, 2007 - 46 comments

I agree. I've enjoyed your breath since 98th Street.

Mickey Jones, ubiquitous yet frequently forgotten or ignored character actor (warning: WMV trailer) and drummer is the Zelig of both the '60s folk and rock scene (very recently seen in No Direction Home) and television and film, linking Don't Look Back (1996) to Don't Look Back (1967).
posted by Hat Maui on Sep 28, 2005 - 18 comments

More Fan Labors of Love

Folk Music. Stefan Wirz and Hideki Watanabe pay homage to their favorites. Check out Hideki's Muscle Shoals page for another slice of his Americana pie. Or click on a name--Eric Von Schmidt, say--on Stefan's completist, slow loading page and wallow in pictures and stories... Then there's the Richard & Mimi Fariña website. Jan Hoiberg's Band site is another. I love labors of love.

And don't forget the Bauls of Bengal or the secrets of John Wesley Harding revealed!

And note, newsfilterians, you can now order Mickey Jone's home movies from the '66 tour, too. I'm going to see the Bobster tomorrow, so I've been thinking of these things.
posted by y2karl on Oct 3, 2002 - 18 comments

W.P. Kinsella probably the finest literary chronicler of America's National Pastime is also a master at the delicate art of being sentimental without being saccharine. The Band created some the greatest musical portraits of America ever committed to wax. Both of these artists tackle very "American" themes, yet both(excepting Band drummer Levon Helm) are Canadian. Canada is often ignored or glossed over culturally speaking, but these two examples make me think that perhaps Canadians have a unique perspective on America that helps them create such amazing portraits of the US.
posted by jonmc on Mar 8, 2002 - 16 comments

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