15 posts tagged with trademarks.
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NONE of the visual & audio materials in this film were made by me

NOT MINE by Guy Trefler. [slvimeo, somewhat nsfw]
posted by cthuljew on Jul 25, 2014 - 12 comments

Eat More... Crow?

The Chick-fil-A corporation doesn't want anybody to ”eat more” anything, unless it comes from them. Not even non-food items — once again they're after the Vermont artist whose t-shirts and stickers have become legendary (in certain crop circles, at least) for extolling the wonders of kale. Kale t-shirts — they taste like chicken, right?
posted by LeLiLo on Nov 27, 2011 - 148 comments

Letters Are Symbols Which Turn Matter Into Spirit

Letterology — an open classroom in book design, experimental typography, and professional practices. Popular posts include : The Olivetti Typewriter, in 1911 Olivetti produced Italy's first typewriter. One hundred years later we continue to celebrate the smart promotion. Early 20th Century Trademarks, pages of trademarked names from the Trade Mark Title Company, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1910-1913. Czechoslovakian Stamp Designs, the variety and styles of the hand lettered text on these stamps is stunning. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Jun 27, 2011 - 4 comments

even posting "Pepsi Blue" would make us liable.

"Drove my Chevy to the levee..."? That's a lawsuit. "Pass the Courvoisier"? Yup. Lawsuit too. Artwork using Barbie Dolls? Lawsuit again... It's all part of the Trademark Dilution Revision Act, which would eliminate the non-commercial "fair use" protections of trademarks in art, literature, and speech-- To amend the Trademark Act of 1946 with respect to dilution by blurring or tarnishment. It goes to the Senate Judiciary Committee on the 16th, and there's a large roster of groups fighting it, including the American Library Association, EFF, and more, saying that consumers as well as artists would be preventing from exercising their free speech rights unless it's amended.
posted by amberglow on Feb 3, 2006 - 35 comments

Total Rekall of the Scharzenegger doll

CNN reports that Arnold Schwarzenegger is threatening to sue Bosley Bobbers seeking to stop production of a charity bobblehead doll. The doll shows the former action-actor turned Governor of California posing in a business suit, ammo belt and assault rifle. Arnold is arguing that he owns the marketing rights to his likeness. The creators argue that he lost those rights when he became a political figure. However, this seems to be a repeat of Hustler v. Falwell. And courts lately have been skeptical of trademark rights trumping satire. On the other hand, there seems to be a fine line between editorial use and commercial exploitation.
posted by KirkJobSluder on May 1, 2004 - 11 comments

File this under barratry

A trademark infringement lawsuit has been filed by the owners of the Dewey Decimal System against New York's Library Hotel, which numbers and fills rooms based on the system: "Each of the 10 guestrooms floors honors one of the 10 categories of the DDC and each of the 60 rooms is uniquely adorned with a collection of books and art exploring a distinctive topic within the category or floor it belongs to." Call early to book Room 800.001.
posted by rcade on Sep 21, 2003 - 53 comments

Who is the real Posh?

Victoria Beckham aka Posh Spice is fighting a move by second division Peterborough United to register their nickname POSH as a trademark for it's club merchandise claiming that the nickname is recognised around the world as belonging to her.

The term POSH is widely believed to have originated in the time of the British Raj when P&O passenger ship tickets were marked POSH -Port Out Starboard Home - port (left-hand side) berths were mostly in the shade when travelling out (easterly) and the starboard ones when coming back. So the best and most expensive berths were POSH. Unfortunately P&O say they have never issued such tickets and none have ever been found even though many tickets do exist from the time.

But this page from the US Navy METOC site claims it originated in Boston as a label for the luggage of wealthy passengers travelling from the US to Europe to indicate which side of the ship to place the luggage to protect it from the sun.

Should you be allowed to register a word in common usage as a trademark? If posh goes what word is next.
posted by stunned on Nov 13, 2002 - 32 comments

Over-aggressive trademark enforcers "advised to chill".

Over-aggressive trademark enforcers "advised to chill". Tommy Hilfiger's trademark is not infringed by Timmy Holedigger perfume for dogs. Perhaps this can be used as precedent in responding to silly cease and desist letters.
posted by kcmoryan on Aug 14, 2002 - 12 comments

"Let's Roll" trademark battle is on

"Let's Roll" trademark battle is on Coming to your local Wal-Mart and flea markets very soon... Supposedly, it's become a "national catchphrase". The only people I've heard say it are George W Bush and Neil Young. Anyone need a new coffee mug?
posted by BarneyFifesBullet on Feb 2, 2002 - 39 comments

Let's make today Link KPMG Day.

Let's make today Link KPMG Day. Why? Because apparently they think that people need their permission to link to them [via plasticbag.org]. This sort of nonsense is completely antithetical to the spirit of the web.
posted by rory on Dec 3, 2001 - 54 comments

eBay takes a leaf out of eToys' book.

eBay takes a leaf out of eToys' book. Everybody's favourite auction site is threatening legal action against EBay Pty Limited, an Australian company that’s been around for twenty years but only got online recently. eBay has the ebay.com.au domain name, so EBay bought ebayaust.com in late 1999 for their small business selling self-published books.

Now eBay wants EBay to stop using the name both online and offline, the latter of which seems highly dubious given the relative ages of the companies.

In what is becoming an increasingly global marketplace, where do we draw the line between disparate companies with similar names?
posted by Georgina on Feb 27, 2001 - 6 comments

Warner Brothers is going after Harry Potter fan sites.

Warner Brothers is going after Harry Potter fan sites. This isn't the first time. It should be interesting to see if they come after The Leaky Cauldron Weblog. It seems they're going after sites with "Harry Potter" as part of the domain name. However they do have a trademark for "Leaky Cauldron".
posted by bkdelong on Dec 8, 2000 - 4 comments

Somebody call a lawyer!

Somebody call a lawyer! Now this is a blatant case of someone ripping off someone else's trademark in a URL if there ever was one. (Courtesy of Hard OCP)
posted by Steven Den Beste on Oct 17, 2000 - 7 comments

Mastercard Wants to Silence Nader

Mastercard Wants to Silence Nader If you thought Ralph Nader's views on too much corporate power were too far out -- click this one. The corporate thugs are trying to shut him down.
posted by snakey on Aug 23, 2000 - 6 comments

The VW vs. Virtual Works case is a lot like the eToys vs. ETOY battle. The vw.net site is owned by a small ISP that has been using it for the last few years, but VW is saying that their brand is diluted and their trademarks infringed when another company uses the initials "vw". Like the eToys case, it looks like Volkswagon has convinced a court of this and will be taking the domain soon. If you remember the different top level domains, .org is for non-profits and organizations, .com is for commercial ventures and corporations, and .net is for network companies and network providers. One would think an ISP qualifies for a .net, and that VW should be perfectly happy with their .com domain, or am I missing something here?
posted by mathowie on Feb 29, 2000 - 8 comments

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