Join 3,425 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

5 posts tagged with twins and conjoined. (View popular tags)
Displaying 1 through 5 of 5. Subscribe:

Krista and Tatiana Hogan turning 4.5

Krista Hogan and Tatiana Hogan are craniopagus conjoined twins joined at the top, backs, and sides of their heads who are astonishing researchers single page (NYT) with their apparent extraordinary cognitive connection to each other. Since their parents decision not to separate them due to the extreme risks involved, researchers have hoped that they could teach us more about how the brain works, and now they are old enough to tell us about it.
posted by Blasdelb on May 26, 2011 - 42 comments

The Twins Who Share A Brain

Tatiana and Krista Hogan are 4 year old twin girls who are joined at the head. Amazingly, their brains are interconnected and share the thalamus, the section of the brain that is responsible for relaying physical sensation and motor function to the cerebral cortex. As a result, it is believed that they can experience one another’s sensations, including seeing though each other's eyes.
posted by jpdoane on Nov 5, 2010 - 43 comments

working together

How can you have a normal life when you have to share your body with a conjoined twin? Some do remarkably well
posted by petsounds on Feb 17, 2007 - 45 comments

Guatemalan girls go head to head

Guatemalan girls go head to head before 50 doctors try to pull them apart.
posted by swift on Aug 5, 2002 - 34 comments

Conjoined twins separated.

Conjoined twins separated. But while that operation is always challenging, this one was particularly bad. The girls were joined at the top of the head, and their brains were merged -- and shared common blood vessels. It took eight-eight hours of surgery to separate them, most of which was spent rerouting blood vessels. Both girls survived the operation. This is only the sixth time this operation has been attempted and only the second time that it has succeeded. (Vertical craniopagus is, mercifully, exceedingly rare.) The operation was only possible at all because the surgeons have spent the last four months practicing it with virtual-reality software on computers (presumably using models based on MRI). Anyone have any idea what software package they used?
posted by Steven Den Beste on Apr 10, 2001 - 14 comments

Page: 1