166 posts tagged with wildlife.
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No Obamacare for animals

From September 1, it is illegal in Alabama to rescue raccoons, skunks, foxes, bats, oppossums and other animals. [more inside]
posted by dontjumplarry on Sep 21, 2013 - 64 comments

Abandoned Buildings AND Cute Animals

Once upon a time, a man explored some abandoned cottages. The people had left long ago, but the houses were still being lived in. Fortunately, the man was a photographer.
posted by Lou Stuells on Aug 22, 2013 - 26 comments

What’s Killing Minnesota’s Moose?

The iconic monarch of the North Woods is dying at an alarming rate. Is it climate change, a brain-piercing parasite, or is something else to blame?
posted by brundlefly on Jul 26, 2013 - 40 comments

In the realm of the Purple Emperor

In The Realm of the Purple Emperor: As I’m sure many of His Majesty’s loyal followers will agree, there’s nothing we love more than to roll around in the mud, dust, dung, poo, shrimp paste, flies, spit and wee to get those highly coveted photographs. [more inside]
posted by Flitcraft on Jul 21, 2013 - 9 comments

In a world dominated by humans....

Photographer Linda Kuo's work focuses on "animals and their encounters with human civilizations". Displaced shows exotic animals being cared for at the Center for Avian and Exotic Medicine in NYC, while Hit and Run shows the aftermath of wild animals' encounters with vehicles upstate. (warning: Dead Animals).
posted by theweasel on Jul 1, 2013 - 8 comments

"The story of Grizzly Adams is big and powerful. Beautiful!"

"Now, my friend Adams was accused of a crime he didn't commit, so he escaped into the mountains, leaving behind the only life that he ever knew." In 1977, three years after the popular movie The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams introduced the story of John "Grizzly" Adams to the public, a TV show of the same name premiered. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 8, 2013 - 45 comments

Switzerland, You Had ONE BEAR...

There was one wild bear left in Switzerland. Last year, M13 (Mike to his friends) was displaying troubling behavior, but a bear expert with the World Wildlife Foundation was optimistic about the possibility of retraining him (via rubber bullets and firecrackers) to be more wary of humans and less likely to forage near houses for food. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Feb 24, 2013 - 84 comments

In a rainforest in Gabon there lives a camera trap. And a mirror?

a herd of elephants cross a stream ... audacity of the mandrills ... panthers play with their reflection in a mirror ... a passing group of gorillas ... 52 red river hogs eat fruit ... a leopard falls in love with the camera trap ... a sitatunga frightens some ibises while crossing a stream ... two elephants fighting ... chimpanzees attack a mirror ... a slithering Gaboon Viper ... a family of elephants on the trail ... 15 animals at the same place, close to camp
posted by ChuraChura on Feb 9, 2013 - 13 comments

To caricature and simplify at the same time!

Charley Harper's "minimal realism" contributions to science and art are being celebrated by the graphic design blog Codex 99. Part 1 - Charley and Edie. Part 2 - The Birds. Part 3 - Tin Lizzie and Dinner for Two. Part 4 - The Golden Book of Biology. Part 5 - Bambi and Childcraft. Part 6 - The Animal Kingdom.
posted by ChuraChura on Jan 30, 2013 - 10 comments

"I never see children. So the animals are my friends."

Born in Africa to French wildlife photographer parents, Tippi Degré had a most unusual childhood. (Possibly NSFW)
posted by DaDaDaDave on Jan 18, 2013 - 19 comments

Don't mock a quokka

When 17th-century Dutch captain Willem de Vlamingh encountered what he described as "a kind of rat as big as a common cat" on on island off the western coast of Australia, he quickly dubbed it "Rats' Nest". Despite the insult, these marsupials aren't known to hold a grudge: the Quokkas, native to what is still known as Rottnest Island and nearby isles, are some of the happiest-looking, most inquisitive furry critters around.
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane on Jan 11, 2013 - 25 comments

Meet Michael Forsberg, Conservation Photographer

I think it is high time that MeFites meet Michael Forsberg, a Lincoln, Nebraska based Conservation Photographer who works primarily in the Great Plains of North America, once one of the greatest grassland ecosystems on Earth. (His bio.) His goal has been to try to capture the wild spirit that still survives in these wide-open spaces and put a face to the often overlooked native creatures and landscapes found there. His hope is that the images can build appreciation and go to work to inspire conservation efforts on the land far into the future. Here is a great 48 minute presentation that Michael gave at the California Academy of Sciences after completing his most recent book simply entitled "Great Plains". In the video he unselfishly shares not just his photographic images but also his equipment and techniques. [more inside]
posted by spock on Jan 10, 2013 - 9 comments

Back where he otter be

For the first time in more than half a century, there is a river otter living in San Francisco. Photos. Photos and video. [more inside]
posted by Lexica on Jan 5, 2013 - 25 comments

Make love, not war.

Humon's illustrated (and explained) animal mating habits. [somewhat NSFW]
posted by cthuljew on Dec 15, 2012 - 15 comments

The Best of Times, The Worst of TImes

Released today: the top Google searches of 2012. Also, the top Google searches in the UK. Hungry for more "Best of 2012" collections? Curious about "best of" versus "most popular"? There's much [more inside]
posted by misha on Dec 11, 2012 - 21 comments

totally unpremeditated and perfectly sincere

More Than Human: Tim Flach's intimate photographs of animal gestures and expressions seem more than a little familiar. [more inside]
posted by changeling on Nov 12, 2012 - 45 comments

Handy Shark Tracker for Vacation Planning

Pick a shark and follow his/her course through the oceans of the world.
posted by mygothlaundry on Nov 6, 2012 - 39 comments

Bubble-jetting emperors

Wildlife photographer of the year 2012
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Oct 19, 2012 - 18 comments

Dallas' Best Kept Secret?

Proving that Dallas is slightly more than concrete, SUVs and bad air quality, the Great Trinity Forest is home to birds, deer, bobcats, badgers, alligators and even a seven foot nine inch, 200 pound alligator gar named Garzilla as documented in the excellent blog Dallas Trinity Trails. [more inside]
posted by punkfloyd on Jul 5, 2012 - 14 comments

Tragedy at Epulu

The Okapi Wildlife Reserve, a UN World Heritage Site, is home to approximately 5,000 of the estimated 30,000 okapi remaining in the wild. Last week, it was also home to a tragedy. [more inside]
posted by MimeticHaHa on Jun 28, 2012 - 43 comments

...and now I want to hug an armadillo.

Rare: Portraits of America's Endangered Species is a short video featuring close-up wildlife footage by National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore.
posted by quin on Jun 4, 2012 - 18 comments

Law and Order: Yellowstone Style

A Death in Yellowstone: On the Trail of a Grizzly Bear. a gripping story and a well written article in Slate, by Jessica Grose. Includes a similarly remarkable photo feature. [more inside]
posted by spitbull on Apr 2, 2012 - 51 comments

Going face to face with a lioness

National Geographic photographer Mattias Klum talks about having a face to face run in with an endangered Asiatic lioness while shooting in the wild. [more inside]
posted by quin on Mar 15, 2012 - 29 comments

Wolves in Central Park!

Hey New York, take your Central Park and shove it! (via) [more inside]
posted by rosswald on Feb 16, 2012 - 41 comments

Bear 71

It's hard to tell where the wired world ends and the wild one begins. For years, wildlife cameras around Banff national park captured photos of animals to track their activity. One of those animals, a female grizzly identified as Bear 71, in now the subject of an NFB interactive documentary assembled from those photos.
posted by RobotHero on Jan 25, 2012 - 14 comments

Adventurers in Short Shorts

Before Steve Irwin brought short shorts in Australian television documentarism to the world, there were the earworming Leyland Brothers, Malcolm Douglas, the original and literal "Crocodile Hunter" who combined conservationism with cooking, and the dry humourist Alby Mangels, who had his own personal filming curse, interviewed Caribbean drug lords, posed nude (SFW) for Cleo, filmed through minefields and warzones, and filmed more than 80 documentaries.
posted by Fiasco da Gama on Jan 15, 2012 - 14 comments

I now have 100 skulls in my room!

My name is Jake and I am a bone collector. This is his room, where he keeps his more than 100 skulls (a contender for the years most awesome cataloguing and archiving effort [look at that organization!]). How Jake cleans up animal bones [more inside]
posted by infinite intimation on Dec 25, 2011 - 12 comments

Tortoises all the way down

"Richard Lewis is director of Durrell's Madagascar programme. Here he speaks about how the team and the local villagers are working to protect the world's rarest tortoise. This includes the drastic measure of "defacing" the beautiful shells in order to make the animals worthless on the black market."
posted by vidur on Dec 13, 2011 - 6 comments

This is why you wear a helmet!

Guy has a close encounter with some wildlife during a mountain bike race. (SLYT)
posted by BlooPen on Oct 11, 2011 - 57 comments

I think I'll call him Rusty.

The red-crested tree rat (Santamartamys rufodorsalis), not seen in over a hundred years, made an unexpected, nonchalant appearance at the El Dorado Bird Reserve in Colombia a couple of weeks ago. Witnesses are unavailable for comment, being too busy with squeals of "Awwwwwww" to respond to questions. Press release here; high-res photos heEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
posted by Gator on May 19, 2011 - 25 comments

The Cat That Time Forgot

Behold the Manul! Otherwise known as Pallas's cat, it was one of the first two modern cats to evolve. (Via The Ark In Space, an amazing compendium of creatures.)
posted by hermitosis on May 9, 2011 - 48 comments

The Definitive Look at the Diversity of Our Planet

Five years ago this week, the BBC started broadcasting one of the most extraordinary documentaries ever to grace television: Planet Earth. The culmination of five years of field work, it employed the most cutting-edge of techniques in order to capture life in all its forms, from sweeping spaceborne vistas to shockingly intimate close-ups -- including many sights rarely glimpsed by human eyes. Visually spectacular, it showcased footage shot in 204 locations in 62 countries, thoroughly documenting every biome from the snowy peaks of the Himalayas to the lifegiving waters of the Okavango Delta, a rich narrative tapestry backed by a stirring orchestral score from the BBC Concert Orchestra. Unfortunately, the series underwent some editorial changes for rebroadcast overseas. But now fans outside the UK can rejoice -- all eleven chapters of this epic story are available on YouTube in their original form: uncut, in glorious 1080p HD, and with the original narration by renowned naturalist Sir David Attenborough. Click inside for the full listing (and kiss the rest of your week goodbye). [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Mar 7, 2011 - 69 comments

The Crazy Nastyass Honey Badger

"This is the Honey Badger. Watch it run in slow motion. It's pretty badass--look! It runs all over the place. 'Whoa, watch out,' says that bird. Eeew, it's got a snake?! ... Oh, the Honey Badgers are just crayzee." (SLYT - 3:21 - via jessamyn)
posted by not_on_display on Feb 15, 2011 - 100 comments

Alligator bites electric eel

What happens when an alligator bites an electric eel? (SLYT) hattip: Boing Boing [more inside]
posted by Joe in Australia on Dec 16, 2010 - 144 comments

Creature Feature

The dhole, the maned wolf, and the Tibetan sand fox are just three of the creatures featured at The Featured Creature, a neat (and not overly serious) wildlife blog. There are even some that aren't canids, I think. [more inside]
posted by Wolfdog on Oct 28, 2010 - 31 comments

USDA glues acetaminophen-laced frozen mice to cardboard, bombs Guam treetops to kill snakes

USDA glues acetaminophen-laced frozen mice to cardboard, bombs Guam treetops to kill snakes
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 on Sep 30, 2010 - 48 comments

Snakes (almost) on a Plane

95 snakes found in bag at Malaysia airport. That's 95 live boa constrictors. Keng Liang "Anson" Wong, 52, was previously convicted of wildlife trafficking in the United States. It is unclear whether he served the full term. (previously)
posted by vidur on Sep 2, 2010 - 17 comments

Tuna’s End

Tuna’s End Adapted from the book "Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food" for the New York Times. A pretty bleak look at the state of world wide tuna fishing.
posted by chunking express on Jul 13, 2010 - 55 comments

They have cameras. And lions. And penguins. And sharks. And...

Wild Film History is a guide to over 100 years of wildlife filmmaking, highlighting landmark films (1959's Serengeti Darf Nicht Sterben, aka Serengeti Shall Not Die - Clip 1, Clip 2) as well as historical relics (1910's The Birth of a Flower - Clip). Check out the links on the Key Events page for an overview of how the genre developed. The site also features biographies and oral history interviews with pioneers (mostly U.K.-based) in the industry. A project of Wildscreen.
posted by amyms on May 1, 2010 - 6 comments

It's not just every day you get to marinate with a tapir, man...

April 27th is World Tapir Day! Take a few minutes to celebrate our prehensile-schnozzed fellow mammals by learning some facts, viewing some cuteness, or supporting the cause.
posted by palmcorder_yajna on Apr 27, 2010 - 37 comments

Featuring the mild curiosity of the notoriously bad-tempered Cape Buffalo

Wildlife photographer mauled by African lion, with pictures recovered from the body. Of course, this is not exactly what it seems, and there are other pictures as well.
posted by davejay on Apr 19, 2010 - 21 comments

Octo-nom

Octopus versus Sea Lion
posted by Artw on Apr 10, 2010 - 47 comments

Nature Photograph Masterclass

Want to take better nature photographs? BBC Wildlife Magazine has published a stack of their 'masterclass' features online. [more inside]
posted by smoke on Mar 24, 2010 - 7 comments

Wildlife for hire

"When you see a wildlife photo or film that looks too good to be true, it probably is." Audubon Magazine's Ted Williams investigates game farms and the widespread use of captive animals in wildlife photography. (via) [more inside]
posted by The Mouthchew on Mar 18, 2010 - 45 comments

Utility Post for Birds

Posts in recent days have thoughtfully considered alternative energy sources, but the idly curious might wonder about other utility posts... you know, the ones alongside the road. Here's a diagram of what all those lines are for, plus a link to the unofficial utility pole page. "How can birds sit safely on power lines ?" you might ask. In fact, avian mortality has been a serious problem for quite some time. Solutions do exist, and efforts are underway to address the issue.
posted by woodway on Mar 5, 2010 - 10 comments

Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle

The largest Herbarium in the world.
posted by hadjiboy on Jan 1, 2010 - 4 comments

The 1956 Pictorial Wildlife and Game Map

Where Do The Animals Live? A pictorial game and wildlife map from 1956, from AzraelBrown's excellent blog The Infomercantile.
posted by jjray on Dec 25, 2009 - 2 comments

The Kingpin

An exposé of the world's most notorious wildlife dealer, his special government friend, and his ambitious new plan. [more inside]
posted by gman on Dec 21, 2009 - 17 comments

Time to get in the water, ya?

National Geographic photographer Paul Nicklen (previously) relates the harrowing tale of a sweet, insistent, and ferocious lunchmate (note - clip begins with a dramatic drumbeat, mind your speakers) [more inside]
posted by Hypnotic Chick on Nov 12, 2009 - 37 comments

World's Longest Invisible Fence

Twenty years ago this month, the nearly 700 mile border between East and West Germany started to disappear. "The fence is long gone, and the no-man's land where it stood now is part of Europe's biggest nature preserve. The once-deadly border area is alive with songbirds nesting in crumbling watchtowers, foxes hiding in weedy fortifications and animals not seen here for years, such as elk and lynx. But one species is boycotting the reunified animal kingdom: red deer." According to the Bavarian National Forest Park Service, scientists [link in German] have recorded nearly 11,000 GPS locations for 'Ahornia," a red deer who appears to never enter the Czech Republic.
posted by webhund on Nov 4, 2009 - 22 comments

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