150 posts tagged with wildlife.
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photographs of wildlife

Wildlife Photographer of the Year
posted by Flashman on Feb 9, 2008 - 15 comments

Wildlife rehabilitation videos

Wildlife rehabilitators take care of wounded or orphaned animals, nursing them back to health and preparing them for a life back in the wild. This leads to a lot of cute baby animal videos. (Roll over for descriptions.) [more inside]
posted by Upton O'Good on Jan 7, 2008 - 14 comments

Sad.

What I Killed Today. I work with a lot of injured wildlife. Also not wild animals that are just in a lot of pain. Sometimes I have to euthanize them. I decided to record each animal I euthanize here.
posted by monju_bosatsu on Dec 9, 2007 - 80 comments

Where the wild things are

Build your wild self using a flash game from the New York zoos and aquarium and the wildlife conservation society. [more inside]
posted by FunkyHelix on Oct 23, 2007 - 18 comments

The battle of the gentle giants

Giraffe mating battles can be brutal but they are generally gentle giants. Man's fascination with these exotic creatures can be tracked from 9,000 year old rock art to the quest for exotics that brought them to the courts of Medici-era Florence, Restoration Paris, and Imperial China, spawning much curiosity and fanciful illustration. Today, giraffe-o-philes can get up close and personal in Kenya's Giraffe Manor. [more inside]
posted by madamjujujive on Sep 30, 2007 - 32 comments

Global warming hasn't gotten us yet. Inspiration.

"This site brings together just a few of the hundreds and hundreds of new species discovered since the year 2000. Hopefully, it will inspire us to see the world as a place still being explored, and give us the courage to conserve and protect the fragile, shrinking areas of habitat left on Earth... areas which, as we see here, contain creatures we haven't even yet Imagined... " That, of course, makes living in a low impact woodland home even more appealing or scary (you choose). Although I will admit that even the best of intentions can lead to perile, as in the case of Timothy Treadwell (as previously discussed). He too wanted to be 'one with nature'.
posted by NotInTheBox on Jul 24, 2007 - 18 comments

Urban Coyotes Attack!

When Wild Coyotes in San Francisco Attack (previously).
posted by Chinese Jet Pilot on Jul 16, 2007 - 27 comments

Where the gazelle and the antelope play...

Unexpectedly, thousands of mammals were spotted during their migration in the Southern Sudan surprising scientists who had given up thinking that wildlife might still exist [video link] in this war torn region of the world.
posted by infini on Jun 13, 2007 - 11 comments

Paul Nicklen Photography.

Paul Nicklen's Northern Wildlife Photography.
posted by srboisvert on Jun 12, 2007 - 10 comments

Urban Coyotes

Wild coyotes roam San Francisco.
posted by Chinese Jet Pilot on Jun 6, 2007 - 60 comments

Badgers Badgers Badgers Badgers --Oohh a snake!

Badgers--fierce, secretive, beloved, reviled, surprisingly widespread, and enemy to snakes [Warning: Gore in "Snakes"]. Cousin to ferrets and weasels, badgers have some strange habits--such as digging a large new burrow to sleep in every night.
posted by agentofselection on May 12, 2007 - 24 comments

Time Keeps On Slippin', Slippin', Slippin'

Bald Eagle nest cam. 24/7 real-time video of a Bald Eagle nest at Norfolk Botanical Gardens in Virginia.
posted by fandango_matt on Apr 14, 2007 - 12 comments

Butterflies are $4.95 Plus Tax

The Palos Verdes Blue Butterfly was thought to be extinct in 1982, after its primary (and federally protected) habitat was (allegedly) destroyed by the City of Ranchos Palos Verdes. But in 1994, butterfly enthusiasts discovered that it had apparently survived LA's best efforts to destroy it. It even spawned a PC app (that anyone can download) aimed at tracking insect populations. These days, it's doing better.
posted by hifiparasol on Apr 3, 2007 - 4 comments

'tis but a base ignoble mind...

Bee eaters and lesser kestrels.
posted by Wolfdog on Mar 3, 2007 - 12 comments

Tiger tiger burning bright

As two more villages are relocated to create reserves for Project Tiger in India, each family will be offered two hectares of land, a house and 100,000 rupees or approximately $2200. But is this a sustainable solution for anti poaching measures? At Ranthambhore tiger reserve in the backward district of Sawai Madhopur, poaching has been controlled but pressure on the park remains as long as the seven relocated villages are unable to find alternate sources of long term income and other resources. When seeking food and shelter, saving the tiger is the last thing on their minds. Witness the slaughtering of the rare gorilla in Congo for food recently until the rebels were convinced to stop. Local needs versus long term ecological preservation will continue to be issues unless alternate viable solutions can be found.
posted by infini on Jan 26, 2007 - 8 comments

*insert loon call here*

The late Dan Gibson: Pioneering wildlife documentarian and sound archivist. Inventor of the Dan Gibson Parabolic Microphone. Musician. Order of Canada recipient. All-around good guy.
posted by The Card Cheat on Dec 19, 2006 - 6 comments

...who's the grayest of them all?

Elephants are self aware (news story, videos). "As a result of this study, the elephant now joins a cognitive elite," said researcher Frans de Waal at Emory University. [Past posts tagged with "elephant" "elephants"]
posted by salvia on Oct 31, 2006 - 52 comments

He was a good friend of mine.

Amphibian Extinction Crisis: "For the first time in modern history, because of the way that humans are impacting our natural world, we're facing the extinction of an entire class of organisms....This is not the extinction of just a panda or a rhino, it's a whole class of organisms." Original declaration of the Amphibian Conservation Summit (pdf). More details in the BBC and San Francisco Chronicle. Previously.
posted by salvia on Jul 7, 2006 - 9 comments

urban jungle

the new urban jungle. . . is a growing movement led by cities like San Francisco, New York, and Leiden to restore active and vibrant natural systems in urban areas. Far from the eden-like depictions of nature of yesteryear, i.e. the garden of earthly delights (nonetheless, still attracting some dynamic new christian converts), the movement has morphed into today's backyard and grassroots environmental movement which is more and more a picture of hybridity, compromise, mixed-use, and ultimately, taking nature out of the walled islands of zoos, aquaria, national parks and other thick-walled institutions and offering a different kind of everyday "unmediated" community experience with the new urban wilderness. VIDEO LINK
posted by huckhound on Jul 6, 2006 - 1 comment

Intimate encounters

Dancing with demons - riveting underwater adventure about a close encounter with a giant, hungry Diablo Rojo. Also see filming the Humboldt squid. Past squid threads:1, 2, 3, and 4. Via Squidblog.
posted by madamjujujive on Apr 6, 2006 - 16 comments

having new eyes - the photography of Scott Stulberg

Scott Stulberg takes beautiful photography of people and places in southeast Asia. Also, some fantastic nature and wildlife work. (flash, sound alert)
posted by madamjujujive on Feb 11, 2006 - 14 comments

Squirrels-For-You.com

How To Have A Ton Of Fun Raising Baby Squirrels. Husband and wife document their adventures raising these little spazz-monsters with many photos and some Flash movies. Via Cute Overload.
posted by Gator on Jan 2, 2006 - 40 comments

Best of the wildlife web

National Wildlife Magazine's 35th Annual Photography competition. [via Fark]
posted by Gyan on Dec 10, 2005 - 9 comments

They Otter Just Give Up

We all know that otters are terminally cute (warning: streaming WMV), but the Federal Government is only just now figuring out that they're also smarter than humans give 'em credit for. And they have no respect for the poor widdle shellfish industry. No respect at all. Awww.
posted by Gator on Nov 16, 2005 - 27 comments

Wild Photos

Alex Bernasconi's (Mostly Wildlife) Photography [via MeCha]
posted by Gyan on Sep 16, 2005 - 4 comments

Orcinus cam

Orca Live: The idea of Nature Network is to relay live imagery and sound from cameras set up in Nature throughout the world. "My hope is to bring people closer to Nature without disrupting her" that hope is the hope of Dr. Spong. At this very moment, all over the world, a variety of organisms are beaming with life. Wouldn't it be wonderful if there were media by which people could get a sense of this? If a window could be opened up that would trigger city dwellers' memories of the rhythms of Nature, the way we sense the world and our way of being are bound to change somewhat. That hope, too, lies within. via
posted by hortense on Aug 31, 2005 - 2 comments

Færøyene

The Faroe Islands is a weatherbeaten North Atlantic archipelago, which is small and sparsely populated, but rich in fish, sheep and birdlife. Not to mention dramatic scenes of natural beauty. (More inside)
posted by the_unutterable on Jun 11, 2005 - 26 comments

The Birds

Bird Watchers Guide on Flickr. "Linked list of species submitted; find all photos of a species here".
posted by nthdegx on Jun 5, 2005 - 11 comments

same time, different channel

Sometimes it's hard for me to conceive that other contemporaneous people on this planet lead lives so dramatically different from my own. What if this or this or this constituted your daily commute? Or if this or this were among the challenges you faced in your daily job? The native people and arctic wildlife galleries offer a glimpse of the past preserved. More wonders at Bryan & Cherry Alexander Photography.
posted by madamjujujive on Mar 5, 2005 - 14 comments

more like snorway!

only in Kenya [via memepool]
posted by scrim on Mar 4, 2005 - 11 comments

Organic AEV's - minus the bombs.

Remember the threads last week about R/C planes with digital cameras? Rank amateurs. Animal Planet has upped the stakes in the unmanned aerial vehicle race by strapping a video camera to an eagle. That's right, an eagle. It's incredible. Check out the dogfight in particular. They're also doing a bunch of other cool things with animals and technology.
posted by loquax on Dec 6, 2004 - 28 comments

Sometimes An Elephant Is Just An Elephant

The Peace Parks Foundation is an international, neutral body that coordinates the creation of "Peace Parks" -- a more foundation friendly name for "Transfrontier Conservation Areas." Peace Parks are defined as "relatively large protected areas, which straddle international frontiers between two or more countries and cover large-scale natural systems encompassing one or more protected areas."

Executive Vice-Chairman Willem van Riet of South Africa, in San Diego, California, this month to receive the Presidential Award from GIS software giant ESRI, is that Peace Parks remove the fences of international frontiers -- the "scars of history" -- to let elephants resume their natural migratory paths. An early success of this idea was profiled in full and stunning color by the National Geographic in 2001.
posted by mmahaffie on Aug 22, 2004 - 6 comments

Global warming hits UK birds.

Global warming hits UK birds. The year without young. Have we hit the bottleneck?
posted by lupus_yonderboy on Jul 30, 2004 - 43 comments

Bear Wanders Into Hospital in Franklin VA

A 350 pound black bear wandered through the automatic doors of Carilion Franklin Memorial Hospital. After being trapped in a computer room, law enforcement officers killed the bear. Sadly, as suburbs and towns grow out into the country, more bears are getting the worse of their relationship to humans.
posted by borkus on Jun 17, 2004 - 18 comments

Lions, tigers and bears. Oh my.

Polar bears of Churchill, Manitoba. Wildlife photographer Ken Bereskin has a nice collection of polar bears frolicking in the snow. This itchy bear is so frustrated, he's using the rippled ice of a frozen lake to scratch himself. If you need a change of temperature, he also has over 500 images of wildlife from Uganda and Kenya, including big cats (a mother cuddling with her cubs, a cheetah chomping down on a gazelle, and a young lioness shredding a skeleton to pieces), great apes, and other wildlife (the lowly hyena eating the cheetah's leftovers, a black-headed heron eating a venomous boomslang snake, and a scary-looking vulture taking it all in from above). He also has a smaller collection of desert wildlife from the dunes of Etoshia National Park in Namibia. (His real job is working for Apple, and he has a Panther blog that hasn't been updated in eons, but evidently that's not as much fun as chasing after hungry carnivorous animals in the sweltering heat, or risking frostbite in the snow).
posted by invisible ink on May 6, 2004 - 5 comments

Naturalists' Field Trip Reports

Country Life: Wildlife Reports From Around The World. Here's a generous helping of trip reports from a group of dedicated naturalists who manage to be thorough and entertaining at the same time. It's part of a travel agency's web site, but not so as you'd notice it. Reading through them, one feels quietly (perhaps dangerously?) optimistic at the astonishing variety of all things bright and beautiful in this grossly over-exploited world of ours. (Well, there may be too many birds in the fauna/flora mix, if you're not a certified ornithologist. Oh - and not enough detail on the local gastronomical delights!)
posted by MiguelCardoso on Mar 18, 2004 - 5 comments

Garden birds

Do you wanna see some birds? How about some of these?
posted by mokey on Nov 16, 2003 - 7 comments

Bring Back the Elephants

Bring Back the Elephants! This article proposes returning these "super keystone species" to the Americas, which were inhabited by proboscideans for so long. The eating habits of free-ranging elephants would help prevent wildfires, and this extreme exercise in rewilding would restart the evolution of one of humanity's own "evolutionary nursemaids."
posted by homunculus on Sep 24, 2003 - 23 comments

Junglewalk

Junglewalk
If you need a picture of an alpaca, some video of a nudibranch or audio of a nightjar.
posted by johnny novak on Sep 16, 2003 - 2 comments

Bear discovers fuckwit

"If I get a chance, I'll do it again. I think a bear would make a good pet." In a story that shocked Ottawa, an apparently clueless Quebec woodsman kidnaps a black bear cub, dunking it under water and dragging it by its hind leg. Police and wildlife officers force him to surrender the bear, which is released 60 km from its mother. Charges are pending -- definitely for possessing illegal wildlife, definitely, possibly for animal cruelty.
posted by mcwetboy on Sep 14, 2003 - 21 comments

The Snow Leopard

The Snow Leopard is a magnificent animal (and the cubs are adorable,) but also a very endangered one. A recent study by TRAFFIC, Fading Footprints: The Killing and Trade of Snow Leopards (PDF), describes the threat faced by the species, including in Afghanistan. The International Snow Leopard Trust has released the Snow Leopard Survival Strategy (PDF) to try to aid the species.
posted by homunculus on Sep 7, 2003 - 2 comments

Remove It From My Sight!!

Politics storms the museum Earlier this month, the National Museum of Natural History opened "Seasons of Life and Land," an exhibit of wildlife photographs by artist-naturalist Subhankar Banerjee. If you go to Washington, you'll find the show hung in the museum's Baird Ambulatory Gallery, essentially a basement hallway installed with lights. Just two months ago, however, it was prepared to run in a more complete form in a premiere gallery on the museum's main floor, alongside a major exhibit of botanical paintings. What happened?
posted by bas67 on May 18, 2003 - 15 comments

Nature Portfolios from Hungarian Photographers

NaturArt - fed up with man's ugliness to man? Escape to this Budapest gallery's oasis of nature photography. Don't be off-put by the Hungarian text, hit start and wait for the main menu, then go to portfolios to access the works of about 30 photographers, Tagok for mini galleries, or diaporama for a lovely film. Flash & sound alert, but very well worth it if you have the time to explore.
posted by madamjujujive on Mar 22, 2003 - 12 comments

Claude Dallas: the last outlaw?

Claude Dallas: the last outlaw? In 1981, Claude shot two Fish and Game officers who had come to take him to town for being in violation of wildlife laws. Apparently he "lived by the laws of nature; not the laws of man." It took 15 months to finally bring him in and his run from the law inspired a movie. After being sentenced to 30 years in prison, Claude escaped from the Idaho State Penitentiary and inspired a song of his exploits. Was Claude "the last outlaw" or just a murderer? What place do outlaws and renegades have in today's society?
posted by Hall on Oct 23, 2002 - 16 comments

The Wildlife Conservatory Society has just released a new map of the Human Footprint on Earth. With this map (pdf) you can see just how much wild space isn't left. For a closer look at each continent look here. So what do we do about it? Terraform the moon? Or maybe Mars? Or is our best bet for keeping Earth habitable simply to go electric?

And just to clarify, I'm talking about the impact of humanity on the earth's natural resources, not the supposed giants humans that walked with dinosaurs.
posted by Bones423 on Oct 23, 2002 - 28 comments

Feeling Peckish?

Feeling Peckish? Like a big bald eagle? Order one now! Humour might be one way of trying to protect endangered animals but the bushmeat trade is no joke and fighting it is damn difficult, probably as difficult as fighting world poverty. Does anyone else feel that these jokes just aren't funny anymore?
posted by MiguelCardoso on Sep 19, 2002 - 9 comments

Wild goose chase

Wild goose chase - "British wildlife experts are mourning the loss of Kerry the goose after tracking him by satellite all the way from Ireland to an Eskimo's kitchen in Arctic Canada." No, seriously.
posted by paladin on Aug 27, 2002 - 10 comments

Where have all the bees gone?

Where have all the bees gone? Wild bee populations appear to be declining (members of a local naturalists' mailing list I subscribe to report seeing substantially fewer bumblebees in recent years), and domestic honeybees are susceptible to mites. Since one third of our crops require pollination, this is not just an environmental concern but also a very real threat to our food supply. Find out what's being done about it. Fascinating stuff, if a little frightening.
posted by mcwetboy on May 27, 2002 - 19 comments

Orlando is under attack by alligators: something that isn't that uncommon, but seems particularly bad this year. We're used to losing a hunting dog or two, but when the gators start taking down horses (don't worry, the horse lived) and killing young children in an urban environment, you've got to wonder what's happening. Tip to tourists from a local: if chased by a gator, flee in a zig-zag pattern (gators are pretty fast, but turn like Sherman tanks.)
posted by bclark on Jun 26, 2001 - 18 comments

Animals thought extinct found in remote Cambodian jungle:

Animals thought extinct found in remote Cambodian jungle: British scientists have found a wilderness in the Cardamom region of Cambodia where exotic species, some though to be extinct, have been found. These include the Siamese crocodile, the wolf snake (a new species so named because of its dog-like fangs), large populations of tigers and Asian elephants, and the gower, a forest cow. Ironically, the habitat was protected from significant human intrusion because it was a longtime Khmer Rouge stronghold and also because routes lead to and from it are landmined.
posted by jhiggy on Oct 5, 2000 - 6 comments

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