Join 3,438 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

10 posts tagged with writing by Horace Rumpole.
Displaying 1 through 10 of 10.

Related tags:
+ (126)
+ (122)
+ (101)
+ (98)
+ (62)
+ (51)
+ (46)
+ (44)
+ (42)
+ (35)
+ (34)
+ (34)
+ (32)
+ (31)
+ (31)
+ (30)
+ (30)
+ (30)
+ (28)
+ (27)
+ (26)
+ (25)
+ (25)
+ (23)
+ (22)
+ (20)
+ (20)
+ (20)
+ (20)
+ (20)
+ (20)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (17)
+ (17)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)


Users that often use this tag:
Artw (146)
Potomac Avenue (20)
Fizz (20)
The Whelk (20)
fearfulsymmetry (15)
Joe Beese (15)
Trurl (13)
zarq (13)
reenum (12)
shivohum (11)
Horace Rumpole (10)
nthdegx (9)
AceRock (9)
the man of twists ... (9)
dobbs (9)
MiguelCardoso (8)
MartinWisse (7)
netbros (7)
Blazecock Pileon (6)
Voyageman (6)
divabat (6)
mattbucher (6)
Brandon Blatcher (6)
kliuless (5)
Rory Marinich (5)
Kattullus (5)
mediareport (5)
ColdChef (4)
filthy light thief (4)
dersins (4)
brundlefly (4)
mathowie (4)
Rhaomi (4)
matteo (4)
shakespeherian (3)
tellurian (3)
rich (3)
escabeche (3)
swift (3)
otio (3)
latkes (3)
carsonb (3)
cjorgensen (3)
semmi (3)
Egg Shen (3)
nickyskye (3)
Wolfdog (3)
stbalbach (3)
codacorolla (3)
anothermug (3)
whyareyouatriangle (2)
grumblebee (2)
shotgunbooty (2)
jason's_planet (2)
joeclark (2)
plexi (2)
0bvious (2)
blasdelf (2)
Iridic (2)
timsteil (2)

The Most Dangerous Man in Publishing

Barney Rosset, former owner of the influential Grove Press and Evergreen Review, boundary-shattering publisher of Tropic of Cancer, Waiting for Godot, and Naked Lunch, and U.S. distributor of I Am Curious (Yellow), died yesterday at the age of 90.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Feb 22, 2012 - 30 comments

Save as new

Matthew Kirschenbaum, an English professor at the University of Maryland, is exploring the literary history of word processing. In a lecture at the New York Public Library entitled Stephen King's Wang, Kirschenbaum asks "When did literary writers begin using word processors? Who were the early adopters? How did the technology change their relation to their craft? Was the computer just a better typewriter, or was it something more?"
posted by Horace Rumpole on Dec 27, 2011 - 41 comments

Most everyone visits his shop to have a look at his queer door

Anyone who was anyone in the literary world of 1920s New York signed the door of Frank Shay's Christopher Street bookshop. The door is now in the collection of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas, and they'd like your help identifying the remaining unknown signatures.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Sep 4, 2011 - 13 comments

Set aside some free time; you're gonna need it

Launching today is Byliner, both a portal to the best narrative nonfiction from around the web, and a publishing platform for original works. Some additional background here.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Jun 21, 2011 - 15 comments

AOHell

One night, I awoke out of a dead sleep, and jumped to my computer, and instantly began typing up an article about David Letterman. I kept going for ten minutes, until I realized I had dreamed it all. There was no article to write; I was simply typing up the same meaningless phrases that we all always used: “LADY GAGA PANTLESS ON LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID LETTERMAN,” or some such.

AOL Hell: An AOL Content Slave Speaks Out.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Jun 17, 2011 - 126 comments

#$%!*&

An essay in two parts on the pilcrow (¶) kicks off a new blog called Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Mar 6, 2011 - 17 comments

Reporting the Internet: American Blogs 1999-2010

Reader's Almanac is a new blog devoted to the authors published in the Library of America. Posts so far have featured film shot by Zora Neale Hurston, audio recordings of William Faulkner, and Walt Whitman's astronomical inspiration.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Jul 27, 2010 - 4 comments

2008 AD: Horace Rumpole makes an FPP

70,000 BC: The Earliest Known Examples of Paleolithic Art
668 BC: Ashurbanipal Attempts to Collect all Knowledge
150 BC: Earliest Analog Computer
593 AD: First Mention of Printing in China
1454 AD: The Gutenberg Bible
1964 AD: Creation of ARPANET
From Cave Paintings to the Internet, a timeline of the history of information technology. [more inside]
posted by Horace Rumpole on Oct 30, 2008 - 10 comments

A dot's as good as a wink.

Who killed the semicolon? Paul Collins fingers a 19th-century culprit; Trevor Butterworth finds an American anitipathy to this troublesome punctuation mark. [previously] [via]
posted by Horace Rumpole on Jun 22, 2008 - 68 comments

No more posts until Matt starts paying up

Home taping downloading is killing music authorship. The Society of Authors warns that authors will simply stop writing if they aren't compensated for piracy of their work (as unlikely as that seems). Perhaps they should follow the example of Jim Griffin, newly hired at Warner Music to persuade broadband providers to attach a $5 per month surcharge for the benefit of the major labels, in exchange for halting the lawsuits that have thus far been their mainstay weapon against piracy.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Apr 2, 2008 - 88 comments

Page: 1