Business Card Tricks
September 24, 2012 7:48 PM   Subscribe

Business Card Tricks I love the contradiction. Handing someone a business card is an act of optimism. It says, "Hi, this is me. I want to know you." I love the idea of pairing this optimism and hope with the complete opposite. I love that I can hand this to someone and they will look at it and smile, say "thanks," then turn it over and look at me puzzled. That's making an impact, which is a business card's job. [Cached version of link; scroll down]
posted by mlis (114 comments total) 20 users marked this as a favorite
 
...let's see Paul Allen's post.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 7:50 PM on September 24, 2012 [10 favorites]


Since college, I've had one job where I was printed a stack of business cards. I think I tried handing out 4 or 5 before coming to the conclusion that there's no way to hand out a business card without feeling like a douche.

I guess if it's purely a business situation, like an industry conference or something, it's fine. But when someone hands me a business card in a social or quasi-social situation, I never know what to do with it. I'm like, "um.... thanks?"
posted by Afroblanco at 7:54 PM on September 24, 2012 [5 favorites]


Dammit, Ghostride, I came here to make that joke!
posted by Pope Guilty at 8:00 PM on September 24, 2012


I've never found a good use for them but for some reason every place that I work for insists on getting a box of them printed up for me. I now have half a dozen boxes of the stupid things. I'd guess that they'd be useful if I was in sales but as an engineer, I never actually meet anyone who doesn't know who I am already.
posted by octothorpe at 8:01 PM on September 24, 2012 [2 favorites]


Have we killed this already?
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 8:06 PM on September 24, 2012


The post or business cards?
posted by mlis at 8:09 PM on September 24, 2012


I had my business cards printed on a composite metamaterial, making them effectively invisible, but I'm always losing the damn things and whenever I try to hand them out, people just think I'm fucking with them and walk away.
posted by dephlogisticated at 8:11 PM on September 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


Obligatory: These business cards are all crap.
posted by HeroZero at 8:17 PM on September 24, 2012 [7 favorites]


I really liked this one.
posted by mlis at 8:19 PM on September 24, 2012 [2 favorites]


My business card is a linen rag soaked with chloroform. When I meet a prospect, I tear the airtight foil pouch and quickly hand him the semitransparent cloth. He pulls it close to his face to read the fine print, inhales the gas and passes out.

While he's under, I pry up his eyelids and laser-tattoo my contact info onto his retina.

Coffee is for closers, motherfuckers.
posted by R. Schlock at 8:22 PM on September 24, 2012 [49 favorites]


Since college, I've had one job where I was printed a stack of business cards. I think I tried handing out 4 or 5 before coming to the conclusion that there's no way to hand out a business card without feeling like a douche.

They're not so much for handing out as they are for winning local restaurant raffle drawings.
posted by Pope Guilty at 8:25 PM on September 24, 2012 [12 favorites]


Dammit, Ghostride, I came here to make that joke!

We all did.
posted by shakespeherian at 8:26 PM on September 24, 2012


Every time I see all these awesome business cards I wonder if the person had more than the minimum order made and what it takes to get them to part with one.

Even though there are certain types of sales meeting where 5 people will shuffle in, trying to sell you some sort of enterprise thingamajig, and each will flick out cards onto the table in front of you like they are dealing poker, cards are sort of an anachronism now it seem.

An accountant I used to work with told me a story about business cards. When he was still a young lad and got his first accounting job out of college he worked as some sort of junior junior calculator operator at a huge famous firm. One day one of the guys in the office shows up with a box of cards. He had somehow stolen them from a supply closet, they were cards for some sort of senior vice president.

They all grabbed a bunch and started giving them out to women at bars, just casually. They were all now senior vice presidents.

A few months later the SVP called a meeting of all the junior guys. He said "I know some of you have my cards and have been handing them out to young ladies. They have been calling the office night and day. I just want to thank you"
posted by Ad hominem at 8:27 PM on September 24, 2012 [37 favorites]


Oh good, I thought it was just me.
posted by Flashman at 8:31 PM on September 24, 2012


I have cute little mini cards from moo.com with my kids' contact info on them that I give other parents to ease playdate-making.

I hand those out way more than my own business cards.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 8:35 PM on September 24, 2012 [9 favorites]


Business cards are now a token establishing a relationship. I don't give my business cards to anyone who doesn't already know who I am. They already know how to contact me. If I give them my card, it is a symbol that I choose to acknowledge we have a relationship. My cards are more like Victorian-era calling cards, they just have my name in large type, and my phone and email in very small type at the bottom.

Cards like this are more luxury items than everyday items like they used to be. I think I first saw this when I was living in an artist's loft right over Independent Projects Press, they were famous for letterpress work, the printer won a Grammy for his limited edition letterpress album covers. He showed me a current project, he was printing 5 color business cards on rough oaktag paper. With 5 solid, bright colors, they were a work of art. I asked him how much he charged for work like this. He said that after setup and design, printing cost about $1 per color, per card. Holy crap, each card cost over $5. I was amused at this because I knew the guy and he had already given me one of his $5 business cards. He was one of my best clients.

Anyway, that is one of the worst Design Observer articles I have ever seen. There have got to be better business card stories out there.
posted by charlie don't surf at 8:41 PM on September 24, 2012 [4 favorites]


I did not get the Paul Allen reference so here it is for anyone else who is wondering.
posted by mlis at 8:42 PM on September 24, 2012 [5 favorites]


paper backup?
posted by robbyrobs at 8:44 PM on September 24, 2012


This thread is a great reminder that many, many MeFites are introverts that build amazing things, but never actually think about what it takes to sell what they've made. Exchanging business cards is a mindless but much-needed societal norm, kind of like wearing a blazer and a button-down shirt on occasion, or learning to make small talk.
posted by KokuRyu at 8:46 PM on September 24, 2012 [14 favorites]


Hey, ten years at my job and I finally just got business cards today!

I got told that I may actually have to hand them out to government agents if they come into my work to do background checks. Weird.

I like to collect them for cool art businesses so I can look at their webpages, but I haven't really used anyone else's for work purposes.

I do like the moo cards and kind of want personal cards, but beats me what I'd put on one.
posted by jenfullmoon at 8:46 PM on September 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


My favorite business card ever was from the owner of a barbecue restaurant: he put plain paper cards into the smoker, turning them brown and wonderfully mesquite-scented.
posted by nicebookrack at 8:48 PM on September 24, 2012 [15 favorites]


I've been at my job 3 years and it's the first job where I've actually been through an entire box of 250 already, and had to re-order.

It's because I meet a shit-ton of people at events, and they often want to propose a project, to which I answer 'write me up a proposal and email me' and then give them my card. It is kind of a delay mechanism.

And conferences. But really, they do have a use - though it took me about 20 years in employment to get a job that actually needs them.
posted by Miko at 8:49 PM on September 24, 2012 [4 favorites]


KokuRyu, of course you know that Japanese meishi rituals are entirely different than Western ones. But for everyone else.. I found it much more vital to have cards when I was in Japan than anywhere else. This is all part of the initial establishment of relationship, everyone knows who is ue/shita (higher or lower than you) and how they should be addressed, in what level of polite language. In Japan, your business card doesn't say you are Kenji Suzuki from Sony, you are Sony's Kenji Suzuki. Lots of hierarchical information is conveyed in a simple exchange of cards. This is sort of why I think business cards are tokens of relationships, I learned that in Japan.

Did you know that JAL used to offer a service to international business customers, you would give the stewardess a business card upon departure from the US, they'd radio ahead, and a box of freshly printed business cards in Japanese would be handed to you upon arrival.
posted by charlie don't surf at 8:56 PM on September 24, 2012 [6 favorites]


In my particular branch of software engineering few people bother with them anymore; paper artifacts have taken on a quaint and unwieldy quality. Unless you're dealing with China or, I suspect, any of several other East Asian countries. With me business cards go unused and unneeded to the point where I forget to carry and sometimes even to order them. Then I end up in a meeting with colleagues, partners or clients from China and when I don't have them it does not go over well -- nothing is said but the expressions seem to hover somewhere between offended and contemptuous.
posted by George_Spiggott at 9:00 PM on September 24, 2012


I've worked for 3 industry associations, where the entire networking thing is regarded as a core competency when doing one's job. I would be going to networking events at least (at least!) once a week, and would get stacks and stacks of business cards, so much so that it was necessary to get business card-reading software installed on the office scanner. My predecessor at one job left an entire drawer full of business cards, and on each one he had jotted notes - when this person was met, what was discussed.

These days, LinkedIn (which now syncs with Outlook) has taken the place of business cards to some extent, but not showing up at an event with business cards is still considered a mild faux pax. The cards are not exchanged by shiny-suited salesmen hoping to sell photocopy toner, but provide an entry point for collaboration.

It's surprising, really, how siloed our communities are. People move within certain groups, and rarely interact with others. Business cards provide a great way to connect the dots and investigate possibilities. And make friends too.

Fundamentally, successful (economically, culturally, socially) communities (could be a city, could be an industry) are built upon collaboration and the desire to work for the common good. But how do you meet people? LinkedIn only goes so far, and ultimately we need to be in the same room as someone had have some sort of shared experience, plus share some booze and food. And exchange business cards.
posted by KokuRyu at 9:08 PM on September 24, 2012 [6 favorites]


KokuRyu can speak for himself but I am certain I have seen him mention on the site that his ethnicity and current residence are other than you seem to assume, charlie don't surf.
posted by mlis at 9:10 PM on September 24, 2012


, LinkedIn (which now syncs with Outlook) has taken the place of business cards to some extent, but not showing up at an event with business cards is still considered a mild faux pax.

LinkedIn is a huge help, but still, after a networking event where I've talked to 30 new people and had a few drinks and then went into a day of conference sessions or something, fuck if I'm going to remember all those names. The cards are physical reminders that say "Oh yeah, I'm supposed to look this person up." And nothing else really replaces that. I have Hello! on my iPhone but honestly, it's dorky to use in a conversation. Exchanging cards is just less intrusive.
posted by Miko at 9:13 PM on September 24, 2012 [6 favorites]


Haha, I used to live in Japan, that's all. I had no idea JAL used to do that for you, cds!
posted by KokuRyu at 9:14 PM on September 24, 2012


Yeah my company has a lot financial retail professionals who work with older clients in smallish towns and they go through business cards like no one's business. We order them by the thousand.
posted by shakespeherian at 9:16 PM on September 24, 2012


A twenty-something startup CEO told me that websites are as outdated as business cards now.
posted by StickyCarpet at 9:36 PM on September 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


No assumptions, mlis, I just know KokyRyu has talked about living in Japan at some time, and has more than a passing familiarity with these things.

Anyway, back on topic, here is an amusing site about Victorian Calling Cards. Most of these are far too ornate, I don't think these were really very common, they are just what people collected and have survived. The mundane ones were probably discarded, and most of them probably looked more like this. That's kind of how I make my cards.

I love a lot of the old rituals and etiquette around Calling Cards, like the bent corners:

A folded top left corner meant the visitor had come in person; this corner unfolded meant a servant was sent.

A folded bottom left corner signified a farewell

A folded top right corner meant congratulations

A folded bottom right corner expressed condolence.


And of course, Calling Cards must be deposited upon an appropriate silver platter.
posted by charlie don't surf at 9:38 PM on September 24, 2012 [6 favorites]


What is the new thing now? Is it still Github profiles? For a while it was stackexchange profiles.
posted by Ad hominem at 9:38 PM on September 24, 2012


A website told me that twenty-something startup CEOs are as outdated as business cards now.
posted by charlie don't surf at 9:39 PM on September 24, 2012 [16 favorites]


I've never found a good use for them but...

Wonder no more!

Business cards are for making Menger Sponge sculptures!
(Bonus instruction video)
posted by ceribus peribus at 9:40 PM on September 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


The management of a wire company I met with had business cards made out of copper. I thought it was kinda cool.
posted by mullacc at 9:46 PM on September 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


I need to get some new cards made; I mostly use them for social purposes, so won't bother with my business information. What I really want is a custom size; I carry them in my wallet and I want something that comfortably tucks behind a credit card, normal business cards are just a smidge too big.

I also am dropping all pretense from my cards. I have my official title on mine, president, which is a douche-title for a one-person company. I have friends who work for six-person companies, one president, five vice-presidents.
posted by maxwelton at 10:13 PM on September 24, 2012


I was expecting to see bits of close-up magic one could do with a business card. Instead I just saw some photos of cards made of unusual materials. I am disappoint.

I make my own Moo-sized cards by printing them on paper and cutting them out. I really hated that the Moo cards are coated on both sides as that made it impossible to scribble anything extra on them with a pen.
posted by egypturnash at 10:15 PM on September 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


But when someone hands me a business card in a social or quasi-social situation, I never know what to do with it. I'm like, "um.... thanks?"

For the exact same reason you give it in a professional situation. It has all of their contact information and you're not standing in a (probably) loud social situation trying to spell your name and incorrectly transcribing a phone number and email address.

What do you do? You thank them, stick it in your wallet and transcribe it to your address book later.
posted by Talez at 10:20 PM on September 24, 2012 [6 favorites]


Our company is a small five-person sort of consulting thing; we're really terrible at the "business" part of business (such as invoicing, accounts payable, and anything to do with a corporate image), but we're very good at the actual work we do. By the time anybody meets us face-to-face, they know our reputation and our publications, so it's sort of a point of pride for us that we have never had business cards. Which is part of our slightly eccentric approach, but confuses people in the square world.

One time, we were looking to rent some space, and so four of us show up on the tour. And we have a client in town, so we bring him along as well. The landlord shows us around, and asks a couple of small talk sorts of questions (like what kind of work we do - we provided three different incomprehensible and/or unhelpul answers). We're a band of screaming introverts so even that went badly. He asks our titles, and we don't have any, except our client has a title back home but that's not really relevant. Then he asks who makes the decisions. Awkward silence, then giggling, then someone says "we haven't made any decisions for years". But the capper was when the landlord asked for our business cards and naturally we don't have any.

A couple of days later, one of our guys follows up with the landlord, and the landlord eventually says "I don't believe you guys are even a real company!" Needless to say, the space wouldn't have been a good fit, but the visit did provide our founding myth.
posted by Homeboy Trouble at 10:29 PM on September 24, 2012 [5 favorites]


I once had a card from a lawyer that showed all the things you need to do/measure in case of a traffic accident.
posted by Cranberry at 10:59 PM on September 24, 2012 [3 favorites]


I don't care much for all these fancy materials - what's wrong with a traditional laser-engraved sliver of pink synthetic quartz?
posted by Dr Dracator at 11:14 PM on September 24, 2012 [2 favorites]


This thread is a great reminder that many, many MeFites are introverts that build amazing things, but never actually think about what it takes to sell what they've made.

Extrovert here, I'd like to think that the things I build are amazing, and selling them absolutely never involves business cards.
posted by Mars Saxman at 11:17 PM on September 24, 2012


I've certainly kept and then thrown away my fair share of cards. I've also had lots issued to me... my last job, they printed literally 1000 for me when I'd gone through maybe 30 in the previous few years. Optimistic!

That said, I like the idea of having one or two around. I'm going to get some printed with just my name and email (they can be combined very efficiently), and as someone noted above, if it's not really a good time or place to write down emails or the like, just hand them a card and say to send an email when they get a chance so we can continue the conversation. Nothing wrong with having the option, and it's not like having one or two in your wallet ready to deploy is an onerous responsibility.

But I don't like business cards that are gimmicky. If the person doesn't remember you, that's a different problem entirely. It shouldn't take a novelty business card to make an impression. If it does, or if you're the kind of person who wants every last advantage, well, that's a whole other world of which I have no knowledge.
posted by BlackLeotardFront at 12:02 AM on September 25, 2012


[Since the site is either down or just not working for some of us, I've added a link to the google cache of the page.]
posted by taz (staff) at 12:45 AM on September 25, 2012


QR Code. Acceptable on the back, or not anywhere?
posted by Zed at 12:46 AM on September 25, 2012


I think QR codes are a little gimmicky and no one ever really uses them.
(I could be wrong)

My cards are plain white, uncoated, so they can be scribbled on front and back and feature just my email address (which is also, with little modification, also my name, twitter and website).

I think they are more a cross between calling card and convenient notebook.
I had this thought that simpler was far better and I don't like people phoning me.
posted by Just this guy, y'know at 2:40 AM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


My cards are boring, name, phone, and email. I go through a lot of them though, but I give them to anyone who might ever have a tiny bit of information on a story for me.
posted by SuzySmith at 3:10 AM on September 25, 2012


Mine are made from serrated surgical steel, with a perfect balance and a wicked arc through the air.
posted by Lipstick Thespian at 3:15 AM on September 25, 2012


QR codes would be very nice if my desktop could read them without hassle, to be sure it's easier than typing in a url or email address. Cards are practical for anyone who has something to promote.
posted by Goofyy at 3:30 AM on September 25, 2012


I haven't had a card since the first year of my current job, and I love not having one. It is interesting though, there's definitely types: some people ask for a card and are bemused when I don't have one; others (most, these days) never ask at all.

I was a little disappointed with the profiled cards; was expecting something cleverer rather than most of them which were just fabulously expensive.

Additionally, whilst I'm the first to acknowledge that people make decisions for funny reasons; I sometimes think people tend to grossly overestimate the impact things like business cards etc can have - except perhaps as a small accretion.

I see this at my job all the time. The marketing dept are trying to do things like hand out coasters or whatever at events. It's like, do you honestly think a CIO making a multimillion dollar decision gives a shit about any mere comestible you could provide them? They have a lot more riding on the project being a success, and in my opinion a flashy business card or whatever is no guarantee of that.

Of course, I say all this, and yet I have still met the kind of people that do put stock in that kind of thing. Usually, though, they're the ones handing them out more than receiving.
posted by smoke at 3:37 AM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


I no longer have the need to either bestow or collect business cards for business reasons, so I started thinking about what cards I do keep around. In my life, apparently, the A-list business cards are: the local mom & pop grocer; the Veterinarian; the other Veterinarian; the dog groomer; the pet store; the guy who fixes our heating system; that really good souvlaki place that will begrudgingly deliver but doesn't have takeaway menus.

These are the business cards that are bluetacked to the inside of the cupboard. All the others are rogue strays found tattered and besmudged at the bottom of my purse, stuck in books, or tossed in that one drawer where you put things that you should probably just throw away.

So there you have it: if you are in the business of feeding me, keeping me warm, or taking care of my dog, your promotional material goes to business card Olympus on the cupboard door.
posted by taz at 4:04 AM on September 25, 2012 [3 favorites]


QR Code. Acceptable on the back, or not anywhere?

On a business card? No. You're putting something into their hand that should already contain the important information you want them to have. Why make the card an intermediary step? Why make them now scan the code with their phone, and explore whatever website you're sending them to?

If someone handed me a business card with a QR code on it, I'd label them as someone who cannot communicate clearly and is overly infatuated with technological "solutions" where none need be applied.
posted by Thorzdad at 4:38 AM on September 25, 2012 [7 favorites]


The wood and metal ones are exactly what a n00b "graphic designer" would think up. It goes from "wow, that's neat!" to "ugh, this doesn't work at all" in about 3 seconds. I'm going to carry a slab of concrete around in my pocket all evening? I don't think so. The airplane one at least thought of doing something with it, but in practice works even less well. How'm I going to safely transport a thin sheet of balsa for any time at all?

Of course, I could just transcribe your info into my smartphone (if I had one) but then why the business card at all? Conspicuous consumption is the only possible answer.
posted by DU at 4:39 AM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


I did give out a few dozen of the 1000 cards I got when I started my job, but the rest of them sit in the desk drawer beneath my keyboard at home, used as small note cards for jotting down phone numbers, making short grocery lists, etc. They're great because I get calls at work from people saying, "Hey, you dropped your grocery list at the store. Also, what time does the library close tonight?"
posted by Rykey at 4:48 AM on September 25, 2012


I've never had business cards for my various programming-type jobs. When I started my very small side business (a simple e-commerce site) I figured business cards would be superfluous—after all, it's just a one-man web site. But I started meeting with sales reps and I could see them mentally downgrading me into a less-serious, more-full-of-shit category of customer when they asked for a card and I didn't have one. So, now I have business cards.
posted by enn at 5:19 AM on September 25, 2012


We get cards at work, and I find them useful when I finally meet people I've only ever interacted with via e-mail. Unfortunately, I've also moved my desk four times in the past two years (complete with new phone number each time), so for the longest time the only current information on my cards would be my e-mail address. Then I'd finally get off my butt and get new cards, only to move my desk again.
posted by backseatpilot at 5:21 AM on September 25, 2012


Just as long as they're not plasticated, you know? No-one wants to inhale that crap.
posted by pompomtom at 5:25 AM on September 25, 2012


I think the bike tool one is as much an example of putting your name and phone number on a freebie as a card. It's the same as putting your firm contact info on a pen, thumb drive, or other thing you hope people will carry around as a functional tool, reminding them you exist.

In a previous example of one of these "unique business card" articles, someone had a pocket-sized self-inking stamp with the basic card info on it. When a card was required, he could just take any appropriately sized paper and, voila! new card. That one I thought was clever. (IIRC, I think part of the point was that it was reusing rather than wasting new paper.)

I don't really see a problem with a QR code on a card as long as it's in addition to, rather than instead of plaintext. Then it's just "if you don't have business card scanning software, this is a quick way to add me to your address book."
posted by Karmakaze at 5:38 AM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


I know a lady with a difficult to pronounce name. Instead of standing around trying to explain it to people, she just gives them her card: It's a pretty, colourful card with her name, and a phoenetic pronunciation of her name. That is all.

One of the only cards I've ever used. The others are for professionals that I already have a relationship with, but whose contact info I've never bothered writing down. Certainly, someone's card has never gotten me to buy/use something I wasn't already planning on buying/using.
posted by windykites at 5:41 AM on September 25, 2012


I have 3 cards in my wallet: Vet and 2 Doctors. The Orthopedic surgeon's card is jammed, he has his name, his PA's name and number, his surgery scheduler's name and number, his test scheduler's name and number, and his secretary's name, number, fax and email. Plus: numbers for pharmacy refill, nurse, and all the hours and numbers for the 4 offices he works at. In short, it is like a mini-directory and I appreciate having all the different types of info right at my fingertips.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 6:11 AM on September 25, 2012


I'm getting a decent chuckle out of the number of people who haven't realized that business cards are simply marketing tools, just like the Victorian silver platter mentioned above. They convey an image about you, and in a large number of career paths you have to sell the image as much as you have to sell the actual product. (Heck, some jobs the image is the product)

It is nice to see that many people are able to see past the showmanship and be able to separate the two though.

Outdated? Maybe, but I'd imagine that a large number of these cards still have fax numbers on them as well. So it's not like people freely give up old methods of communication that easily.
posted by Blue_Villain at 6:43 AM on September 25, 2012


I have cute little mini cards from moo.com with my kids' contact info on them that I give other parents to ease playdate-making.

I hand those out way more than my own business cards.


I did that too! It was great. I was going to get a new set printed and then realized that we'd all switched to "call my phone, then I'll have your number."
posted by not that girl at 6:50 AM on September 25, 2012


I first had business cards printed when I was just out of school, with no real skills but a pretty quick learning curve. I was meeting a lot of people, but I didn't really have anything I could "do" - I could do graphic design, I could do video editing, I could figure out an awful lot of software systems, but I wasn't actually a designer or an editor or anything - I was basically just a dogsbody, which was originally what I wanted to have put on my cards. However, the more polite "Factotum" won out.
Additionally, at the time, I was between cell phones - I didn't really have a set number, and so I left a space for the number and bought a stamp. The design at least impressed the printer enough that he posted it on his website and keeps piles of them around as samples.
After four years in jobs where I was given hundreds of business cards that I never used, not being in any sort of a client-facing position, I began freelancing (basically as a factotum) about two months ago, and it's been a real change for me to actually start handing these little things out.
posted by 235w103 at 6:56 AM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


I once had a card from a lawyer that showed all the things you need to do/measure in case of a traffic accident.

Apparently divorce lawyers have gotten the hint, too.
posted by The Bellman at 7:14 AM on September 25, 2012


Business cards are incredibly useful when you're an artist, and even more so when there's a long term project you're working on that may come up at social gatherings with new people.

My policy is that if someone asks enough questions about my comic to seem genuinely interested, rather than spend a lot of their time trying to describe it I'll hand them a card. I has art from the book on it, and very quickly gives them the basic idea of what the book will look like and what sort of things it's about. It's also great for people who want to vaguely keep an eye on the project, because I have a whole tumblr that I only use for that, without cluttering it up with stuff about what television shows I'm watching or Instagram photos of my cat.

Then I'll kind of read their body language to decide if I should offer to take it back and leave their pockets uncluttered.
posted by Narrative Priorities at 7:19 AM on September 25, 2012


While I have never had the pleasure of visiting Japan, I like the idea of how business cards are treated there (with both hands, etc). It sounds respectful.
posted by IndigoRain at 7:20 AM on September 25, 2012


Great fun -- here's these guys standing around in a pissing contest, handing out cards to each other and most especially if there's a woman in the crowd, they're all puffed up and puffed out and I'll say "Oh hey, let me give you my card!" and then hand a few of them out.

All that's written on the card is my first name. Which of course they already know.

It's like tossing a big rock into the middle of a pond. There's this splash, followed by nothing but waves, moving outward. Mostly, they'll turn it over, look at me, turn it over again, quizzically; it's imperative to stand there looking at them straight on, smiling -- that moment can last a long time. I live for those moments.

And of course then give them a pen to write my phone number on, or email, whatever. If they want it.

I love the people who get it, who laugh at it on sight, who can see what I'm up to. And those who don't get it, or don't want to, well, I don't want them to, they're the ones most caught up in the pissing contest -- they can have it.
posted by dancestoblue at 7:42 AM on September 25, 2012 [4 favorites]


If someone handed me a business card with a QR code on it, I'd label them as someone who cannot communicate clearly and is overly infatuated with technological "solutions" where none need be applied.

That seems more of a fashion-police attitude than a practical one. If someone handed me a business card with a QR code, I'd label them a comparatively thoughtful and intelligent person who has provided their information in a form that can be snapshotted directly into my contact list rather than obliging me to transcribe it on a keyboard.
posted by George_Spiggott at 7:43 AM on September 25, 2012 [3 favorites]


Cool business cards are cool, but they always strike me as more of a personal indulgence than a Powerful Marketing Tool. I mean, that balsa wood glider card is just plain neat... but I read that article a few minutes ago and I couldn't tell you the name of the company or what they do. I guess I might if someone handed me one and I assembled it and had it kicking around my desk for a while.
I love that I can hand this to someone and they will look at it and smile, say "thanks," then turn it over and look at me puzzled.
Puzzlement is not the reaction you want from a prospective client or customer.
posted by usonian at 7:55 AM on September 25, 2012


I still find them useful, but as a rule I only offer them upon request. At social functions where I can expect to have them handed to me unsolicited I have a technique of putting important ones in my right pocket and less endearing ones in my left so I know who I intend to follow up with.
posted by dgran at 8:20 AM on September 25, 2012


I work for a government agency where we re-organize so often that my cards went out of date MUCH quicker than I could use them. I have boxes of old cards that chronicle my career path pretty well. I'm at the point now that anybody that would need to know who I am, knows who I am (ie: vendors trying to sell me extremely expensive stuff).

I do, however, grab cards from those same vendors. I see so many I can't keep them straight. I tape them into my notebook next to my meeting notes. Low tech? Yes. Effective? Very.
posted by jeporter99 at 8:51 AM on September 25, 2012


I really read the weirdly anti-card posts here as super-hipster preciousness. Really? You printed cards with only your name on them, just to be a jerk? The entire POINT of cards is the exchange of information. Way to subvert the paradigm, though, buddy. Now go away and let the grownups talk.

I suspect people with weird antipathy about business cards are mostly people who work only internally, and never interact with customers or attend conferences or who give a shit about acquiring business contacts.

I've spent my career in professional services, though, so having a card -- a real card, not some cutesy riff on a business card, or some hipper-than-thou anti-card -- is useful and expected. Do not dismiss as an artifact or symbol of assholery something you just happen not to use because you don't do sales, or don't routinely interact with customers, or attend conferences, or talk to new people, or whatever.

I actually have TWO cards: a professional one, with my company information on it, and a personal one with personal contact data. I give the latter out when I meet new people in personal contexts; it's much more convenient and elegant than whipping out phones to enter in new contact records. I'm sure they're discarded once the info has been put into their phones later, but having a pre-printed paper card makes the act of exchanging info simpler in the analog world.
posted by uberchet at 9:09 AM on September 25, 2012 [4 favorites]


I love having a business card - it has the number for our one fax machine printed on it, for the rare occasions something needs to get faxed to me.

Even in stodgy ol' defense contracting, we are moving away from business cards, but they still have a toe-hold. We had an academic here the other day who asked for my business card (so he could email me his presentation or something) and I was pretty embarrased not to have one. It seems like cards are still the best way to transmit contact information between two people who are face-to-face.
posted by muddgirl at 9:18 AM on September 25, 2012


I'm trying to think of how you could accept contact information from someone while jumping through as few hoops as possible. A QR code on the card at least removes the retyping step. But really, what I'd like is to be able to say later "Siri, who was that guy in the striped shirt I was talking to for at least 5 minutes just after lunch?" and have the contact information pop up with a big button that I can tap to add him to my contact list.

So let's work backwards from that end and see what has to be in place for that to work. First, "Siri" or whatever needs to be able to know where I was and what I was doing. If a given conference has opt-in location awareness technology, wherein my badge or phone tracked my presence, and this DB was accessible to participants, then there might be enough information for my system to make a good inference.

In less structured, more impromptu scenarios we'd either need a global equivalent -- not likely or necessarily desirable -- or something different. That something could work like a dating app -- an always-on, location-aware system that tracks your movements and allows you to discover and be discovered by anyone else who has opted into the same system -- subject perhaps to a range of qualifiers that you can determine in advance.

The fact is, it probably won't happen for the general population unless Facebook, or at a stretch, LinkedIn implements it. Competing private standards don't do very well anymore until a clear winner emerges. This sort of suggests that perhaps a new player could emerge by dint of doing this really well, but there's a chicken and egg problem there: established players with a huge userbase have the advantage. Even if some new player appeared and got some traction, Facebook could very quickly deploy something comparable and eat their lunch.
posted by George_Spiggott at 9:42 AM on September 25, 2012


Way to subvert the paradigm, though, buddy. Now go away and let the grownups talk.
...
posted by uberchet


Eponysterical.
posted by Flashman at 9:51 AM on September 25, 2012


Oh, and as far as privacy is concerned, it could require confirmation just like an instant message app, perhaps with a validation step. Having provisionally located you, your copy of the app would pop up a message saying "Joe Bloggs (photo/avatar/logo) is requesting your contact info". There could be three buttons "Accept", "Ask Why", "Reject". If you pushed the middle button, Mr Bloggs would have to say something identifying like "we talked this morning at the Emergent Nosehair Ablative Technologies Concilium, Nanotechnological Ointments Subcommittee Breakfast".
posted by George_Spiggott at 9:51 AM on September 25, 2012


There are already pretty robust apps for conferences, and conferences require registration, and that could be the opportunity to upload sharable profile information. If you've downloaded the conference app and logged in, you've got the database you need...for that conference. It just isn't necessarily transferable, unless you have some options to export it. And it wouldn't work in non-conference life.
posted by Miko at 10:16 AM on September 25, 2012


You know, uberchet, you had me up until this part :

I actually have TWO cards: a professional one, with my company information on it, and a personal one with personal contact data. I give the latter out when I meet new people in personal contexts; it's much more convenient and elegant than whipping out phones to enter in new contact records

The business context thing I get; even though it's a situation I don't find myself in, I could see why some people have a use for it. But the "personal business card"? Really? For one thing, I'm not even sure those words belong together, unless you're a drug dealer or a pimp. I guess those qualify as personal businesses. But yeah, I think it's weird when people hand me a business card in a non-work context. It's way too formal for what they're trying to accomplish, which I'd imagine is the formation of some kind of friend/acquaintance bond.
posted by Afroblanco at 11:28 AM on September 25, 2012


For the record, though, I pretty much use Facebook to keep track of my social connections. If I like someone, I'll friend them immediately. Occasionally you find spoilsports who aren't on Facebook or have their security settings such that you can't find them in a search. The latter, I'll usually ask them to find me.

Yeah, some people aren't cool with this, but you know what? Those are people I wouldn't stay in touch with anyway. What the hell am I going to do? Email? Text? Call? Someone who I only met once? Yeah, I did that back when I was dating, but in any other context, I'd feel weird about it.

But no, I wouldn't use Facebook for work relationships. I don't even friend my coworkers, except in rare cases.
posted by Afroblanco at 11:38 AM on September 25, 2012


Some of us just like business cards.
posted by grubi at 11:40 AM on September 25, 2012 [3 favorites]


What's extraordinary to me is how a thing which is supposed to smooth interactions between unacquainted people can produce this much conflict -- most of it more than a little petty -- in a thread about it where pretty much nothing is at stake.

There's something emblematic of the incoherence and insecurity of Western culture these days about this.
posted by George_Spiggott at 11:46 AM on September 25, 2012 [3 favorites]


WHADDAYA MEAN BY THAT
posted by grubi at 11:52 AM on September 25, 2012 [2 favorites]


I actually love it when people give me a non-business card. A "here's me!" card, or whatever you want to call it. Actually, a hundred years ago, they just called it "my card." Or a calling card. It's a swell idea, and people are often much more creative with those than with their standard-issue business card. My bf has been trying to design a personal card for years, and once saw someone's which just had their name and contact info, and at the bottom it said "Let us begin." A good all-purpose.
posted by Miko at 11:55 AM on September 25, 2012


For the record, though, I pretty much use Facebook to keep track of my social connections. If I like someone, I'll friend them immediately.

Ugh, my nightmare. I don't want more loosely connected, random, "who the hell is this person again and why are they fighting about Mitt Romney with my uncle?" Facebook 'friends.' I've really tamped my FB down to family and actual friends. And I've decided that my work contacts - even co-workers I'm friendly with - really don't need to see my family vacation pictures, my party face, my political rants, etc. - so I actually defriended my entire work cohort of friends, though I explained it to them in person. Most people totally got it; those who haven't already jumped ship on the awfulness of FB are tempted to.

The hard part is, Facebook does work well as a directory. Or more of a switchboard. Yeah, it works well as a switchboard. But if you want to use it as a switchboard, you have to accept all the other constantly changing access levels and functions that people can have with your content, and a switchboard you can't fully control is a lousy switchboard. And if you want to use it to share genuinely in-group things with your gang, it sucks that you can't really do that easily without flooding the switchboard.

Facebook won't be the paradigm forever, and there's room in this rather vast space between LinkedIn and FB - and in people's differing usages of each - for something else. Something that works like a true switchboard - "I've met this person and might want to contact them at a moment's notice sometime in future" - and not like a virtual hangout. There's going to be another default listing/message/switchboard service before long, I think, because the social and privacy complexities of using FB are too much for the non-power-user to tolerate much longer.
posted by Miko at 12:02 PM on September 25, 2012


I've really tamped my FB down to family and actual friends.

I use Facebook as a place to post stupid puns and other random meaningless frivolity. Isn't that what it's for? A constant stream of random, moving ephemera?

For communication that I actually care about ... yeah, email's good for that.
posted by Afroblanco at 12:12 PM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


What's extraordinary to me is how a thing which is supposed to smooth interactions between unacquainted people can produce this much conflict -- most of it more than a little petty

I think you may be the only one here who's actually taking it that seriously/personally.
posted by Afroblanco at 12:15 PM on September 25, 2012


shut up shut up shut up shut up nananananananana
posted by George_Spiggott at 12:26 PM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


George, allow me to give you my business card.
posted by grubi at 12:29 PM on September 25, 2012


I just write my information on my forehead in stamp ink and then headbutt people all day. It'll be right way around for them in the mirror.
posted by George_Spiggott at 12:31 PM on September 25, 2012 [4 favorites]


I had my forehead letterpressed because I deserve it.
posted by grubi at 12:33 PM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


I just write my information on my forehead in stamp ink and then headbutt people all day. It'll be right way around for them in the mirror.

You're Wesley Willis?
posted by Afroblanco at 12:36 PM on September 25, 2012


Naw. OR AM I
posted by grubi at 12:38 PM on September 25, 2012


Afronblanco, you don't find the exchange of contact data kind of tedious, what with the "let me get a pen" or "hold on while I wrestle with my iPhone/Droid/featurephone/laptop" or whatever? Handing off something that has my name and email is useful in those contexts.

People have used their actual professional cards for this purpose for a long time, especially when people tended to only have work email addresses. That time's past, and I prefer not to cross the streams.

Think back. It's like a calling card, but with actual useful information on it.

It seems obvious we don't have much in common in re: social management, though, since in your followup post you seem to dismiss people who eschew Facebook.
posted by uberchet at 12:45 PM on September 25, 2012


Yeah, I usually just find people over Facebook, or if I don't think any of my friends know them, I jot down their email in my phone and then look them up over Facebook later. Sometimes I'll just look them up on Facebook and friend them on-the-spot.

And it's not a matter of dismissing people. Facebook is the perfect informal way to stay in touch with acquaintances. Even if I did take someone's personal business card, I don't know what I'd do with that information. I can't see myself calling, texting, or emailing someone unless I had a specific thing in mind to contact them about. What if I like someone and want them to stay on my radar, but don't have any immediate plans to hang out with them, or have anything pressing to talk to them about?

Facebook is just a great way to stay passively in touch with people. It works for me.

Business cards just seem so formal. I don't think I could ever get past that.
posted by Afroblanco at 12:55 PM on September 25, 2012


"Here's my contact info on a piece of card paper. You can put it in your pocket right now so we can continue our conversation."

Formal?
posted by grubi at 1:01 PM on September 25, 2012 [2 favorites]


I think there's a bit of confusion about what a QR code is. It's just digitally encoded text. It can be a URL, but it can also be vCard information (or any other information, for that matter). A business card with a QR vCard lets anyone with a phone add all of your contact information to their address book without having to type anything and without hitting the Internet.

A link to your blog or facebook page might be tacky, but "Here, let me save you some typing" seems considerate to me.
posted by brokengoose at 1:19 PM on September 25, 2012


I actually love it when people give me a non-business card. A "here's me!" card, or whatever you want to call it. Actually, a hundred years ago, they just called it "my card." Or a calling card. It's a swell idea, and people are often much more creative with those than with their standard-issue business card. My bf has been trying to design a personal card for years, and once saw someone's which just had their name and contact info, and at the bottom it said "Let us begin." A good all-purpose.

Eh...a personal social card seems to belong in the same realm as the fedora. The person using it is thinking that they look like a suave motherfucker when it makes them come across as an asshole. It's just way too cutesy and pretentious to whip out a card at a bar or something when that isn't the social norm. It just screams, "I'm so awesome and eccentric, don't you agree?" It's an affectation of the worst sort.

But business cards are useful for business. It's weird seeing people here say with pride that they don't use them. They're just tools; if your line of work doesn't need them, don't use them, but it's odd to take pride in that as it would be odd to take pride in not using a hammer in work that doesn't need hammers.
posted by Sangermaine at 2:32 PM on September 25, 2012


>makes them come across as an asshole. . . an affectation of the worst sort.

Wow, judge much, Sangermaine? As grubi notes, it's way less of a weird thing than halting a normal social interaction _to find someone on a social network and friend them_ at a party. I mean, seriously? People do these things? Good Christ.

It occurs to me that if you decide I'm an asshole because I have and use these cards, it'll save me time, because I won't have to waste any of my time on you. That might be another good reason to use them.
posted by uberchet at 3:27 PM on September 25, 2012 [3 favorites]


Geez.

I think a lot of this comes down to the circles you run in. I'm in a big public organization, I do activist things, I volunteer, I run events...basically I'm trying to get in touch with new people all the time. I want to meet people, hear about their ideas, follow up with them, without inviting them into my close circle of friends, but just collaborating on our overlapping interests. Before I was in this career, I might have thought all this was dumb, too. Now, I think - no, I know - mechanisms like this are necessary.

There are clearly some people whose social and professional lives aren't like that, and to them, this whole endeavor, I guess, looks ridiculous. And in their world, it may be. In mine, it is essential to quickly and gracefully exchange info while having a face-to-face conversation. And they don't have to join my personal social network to do projects with me.
posted by Miko at 3:32 PM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


As grubi notes, it's way less of a weird thing than halting a normal social interaction _to find someone on a social network and friend them_ at a party

First off, that's some pretty heavy paraphrasing on your part. Secondly, the friending happens at the end of a conversation, during the "hey we should hang out some time" phase. Not so weird, and a lot more useful than a business card, in my opinion.
posted by Afroblanco at 4:06 PM on September 25, 2012


Miko : Interesting how much career choice plays into it. It sounds like you get a lot of your social fulfillment through your career, so maybe you're more guarded about your social life. My career (software engineering) tends to be more solitary, so I'm always trying to enlarge my social circle.

I guess I (and probably others in this thread) have always associated business cards with careers and people that we (perhaps unfairly) view as phony -- sales, business development, etc. -- thus the reason it seems a bit douchey. And since giving out business cards isn't part of my daily thing, they seem very formal and official and work-oriented; giving out a business card in a social situation strikes me as injecting formality into a situation where I'm informally trying to bring someone closer.

Now that I think about it, I did wind up at a startup meetup about a year ago, and felt a bit unprepared for not having business cards to give out. I suppose the lesson is : business cards when you'll be around people who expect them, otherwise leave them at home.
posted by Afroblanco at 4:29 PM on September 25, 2012


I'm assuming a lot of the people who are like "Business cards wha?" have, you know, traditional jobs. For a lot of freelancers and small independent businesses, business cards are indispensable.

I have gotten a fair amount of business over the years just through friendly conversations with random people. You're talking to the barista, she asks what you do, you say you're a freelance writer or web designer or whatever. She says "Oh, we need a blogger or a website or whatever." You say great, and hand her your card.

If she's the business owner, she can tuck it away and change the conversation. If not, she can pass it to her boss later. (Who may well chuck it in the trash, but hey, at least you're getting it out there.)

I assume that, with more and more people going solo, business cards will start to seem less weird as time goes on. I feel like I ought to apologize for having business cards and actually using them, but hey, if you want to be a successful freelancer, you gotta hustle, you know?

Also, I just got an order of business cards for my latest venture, which was a bit silly, but it makes me happy. I won't self-link but next to the website name, the card says "Informative! Sparkly! Also some poop jokes." Come on, that's a hilarious business card! I can't wait for an excuse to hand it to someone.

What can I say? Vistaprint has me firmly in their grip.
posted by ErikaB at 6:27 PM on September 25, 2012


during the "hey we should hang out some time" phase.

Yeah, most of my interactions don't have that phase.

Interesting how much career choice plays into it. It sounds like you get a lot of your social fulfillment through your career, so maybe you're more guarded about your social life

Oh god yes. My job is really busy, and my problem is not finding people to fill in my social life, but trying to carve out enough time away from work and volunteer stuff and events in order to enjoy what I fondly call my 'Personal life." I don't get enough time with my real, close friends and family to just hang out and not be doing a Project of some kind, so it gets really precious. And I look to protect it. That's not to say I don't make new friends and enlarge my circle, but just that, at my age and given my schedule, the precious time and space I have that's not about producing shit is not up for sale, and I don't take people into the 'inner circle' immediately. If you end up having hundreds of affiliates, collaborators and aquaintances, you may find that your problem isn't finding new friends, but keeping enough space in your life to spend quality time with the friends you really want to invest in and prioritize.

I...have always associated business cards with careers and people that we (perhaps unfairly) view as phony -- sales, business development, etc. -- thus the reason it seems a bit douchey

All I can say is that my bf used to have this same opinion. And he used to rail at me for being excited about an event that was for 'networking' because his idea of networking was that it was all douchey, just a bunch of empty-hearted yuppie-type people trying to be manipulative and get something out of each other. But after we worked together on some community projects, got an event series up and running, etc, he started to see it more like I see it: that the world is absolutely full of interesting and talented people, that you can meet them anywhere, and if they're excited about what you're excited about, you can put your ideas and resources together and make some amazing things happen.

And you don't need to be buddies to do that: you just need to be partners. So 'friending' isnt' really a natural next step to that. It's about doing shit, not being hangout friends (though sometimes project partners turn into hangout friends- in fact, it's one of the best ways to make friends and meet people who are really interesting, doing projects with them).

And once you make that kind of transition, having easy, handy means of contact for the people you meet - no matter where, when,or what the situation - makes a ton of sense. I could be anywhere and learn that someone I just met is a glass artist who loves doing public workshops, or has a gypsy jazz band, or does yarnbombing, or what have you, and I want to be prepared for that, and want them to be able to contact me and send a proposal. That kind of thing. It's a first step toward doing more cool things, getting more of what we all want out of life.
posted by Miko at 6:42 PM on September 25, 2012 [2 favorites]


...it was all douchey, just a bunch of empty-hearted yuppie-type people...

"It's a business card, take it!"
posted by ceribus peribus at 7:07 PM on September 25, 2012


"I guess I (and probably others in this thread) have always associated business cards with careers and people that we (perhaps unfairly) view as phony -- sales, business development, etc. -- thus the reason it seems a bit douchey. And since giving out business cards isn't part of my daily thing, they seem very formal and official and work-oriented; giving out a business card in a social situation strikes me as injecting formality into a situation where I'm informally trying to bring someone closer."

Some of this is clearly the circles I move in (it never occurred to me that people might hate business cards), but when I was out of studenthood but didn't yet have business cards, I dearly missed them and longed for the days of social cards, largely because it's an easy way of giving people the correct spelling of my non-phonetic last name (and e-mail) -- even in social situations. People give me business cards in social situations reasonably frequently, even just as a scrap of paper they can write their personal phone number on the back of. It's never struck me as formal in that setting, just convenient.

My use of them has really tailed off, though -- now that I'm reasonably embedded in my local community and my professional community, most people already know who I am, at least by reputation, and how to get in touch with me. I think if you're in a business-cardy profession, but not in a sales-type position, your use of them comes in bursts -- when you're in a new city, have a new peer group, change contact details -- and otherwise, once you're established, it's a slow drip where you risk forgetting to replenish your wallet/card case when you run out, because you use them so rarely when not at convention-y things.

"Wait -- let me guess -- are you an engineer? An attorney? There is nothing funnier than watching you wave your scraps of paper around when there are women in the group. You should see it. Jesus christ. [...] you'll do fine on internet forums, maybe at tea parties, with crumpets, and little old ladies"

Probably the engineer with the business card isn't lumping my little lady brain in with the hot young female quarry to be pursued or the dull, useless old lady to be ignored. Jesus Christ. It's hurting my brain to see someone so proud of himself for interacting awesomely with other people while relegating women to the status of things.

As an attorney myself, usually when male attorneys are giving me their cards, it's because I've asked for their contact details because we're professional colleagues with something in common to discuss. But I guess the idea that women and men might be interacting professionally is a little outside your scope.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 9:13 PM on September 25, 2012 [2 favorites]


[A couple comments removed.]
posted by cortex (staff) at 9:17 PM on September 25, 2012


Check out Woz's card.

Alas, it wasn't posted to imgur by me.
posted by Ad hominem at 10:03 PM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


(leans out of window)

BUSINESS CAAAAARD FIIIIIIIGHT!
posted by Kloryne at 10:18 PM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


I don't have a problem with business cards in general and I can see how they're useful for people in certain jobs, I just think that it's silly to automatically order a box of them for every single employee in a company when only a small percentage actually will ever use them. It's similar to the rules that my company keeps sending out telling you to put these horrible image heavy signatures tied to the current company sales campaign on all your emails. I've never sent an email from my corporate account to anyone outside the company so having a sales pitch in the signature is pretty stupid but sales and marketing runs the company, not engineering.
posted by octothorpe at 5:18 AM on September 26, 2012


Oh, Metafilter, how you never fail to astonish with what can be a polarizing issue.
posted by Zed at 9:11 AM on September 26, 2012 [2 favorites]


OH YEAH?
posted by grubi at 10:13 AM on September 26, 2012 [1 favorite]


For a lot of freelancers and small independent businesses, business cards are indispensable.
Absolutely... I've had "regular jobs" where I got the obligatory box of business cards that I never handed out because my position just didn't involve many meetings or networking with outside people. And I've been handed plenty of cards by smarmy sales types... but criminy, it never occurred to me to nurse the kind of seething virulent hatred for business cards I'm seeing from some quarters here. Smarmy guys gonna smarm, a lot of times it's easier to get rid of them by just taking a card even if you fully intend to chuck it at the next trash can or recycling bin.

As the owner of a small business selling handmade stuff who frequents shops and fairs frequented by other makers of handmade stuff I can attest that cards are a must. If you get into a conversation with someone about suppliers, techniques, whatever, and ask them to send you a link or some other information later on (or vice versa), a card is just the thing. It has relevant contact information plus space to jot a quick note reminding yourself or the recipient why they have the card. Not everyone has a smartphone they can whip out to send me an email or collect my contact information on the spot. Conversely, I do have a smartphone and would much rather just take a card and let someone get to their next customer than fumble to open my address book app and hold them hostage while I collect their information.
posted by usonian at 11:25 AM on September 26, 2012


(Throws away new box of cards with my phone nuber and a picture of my junk on them.)
posted by maxwelton at 2:56 PM on September 26, 2012


Moo introduces NFC enabled cards. This may be the first advance in business card technology maybe ever?
posted by Ad hominem at 9:29 AM on September 27, 2012


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