doing things in the most complicated way possible is just what he does
May 21, 2013 10:09 PM   Subscribe

 
Engineering its design with various failure modes in mind, so that the ring lasts — that's true love.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 10:14 PM on May 21, 2013 [13 favorites]


I think this person should patent this and sell it.
posted by empath at 10:18 PM on May 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


Neat concept, but IME rings shaped like that (i.e. thick + corners) are really uncomfortable, and nagging discomfort is probably not something one would want in an engagement ring.
posted by Sys Rq at 10:19 PM on May 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


I think he mentioned that it was designed as a token and he intended to simply take his fiancee to a jeweler and buy a regular ring later on but that she declined. It is most definitely impractical to wear in addition to being extremely impractical to manufacture.
posted by GuyZero at 10:24 PM on May 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Five months of work and he made the wrong size.
posted by miyabo at 10:24 PM on May 21, 2013 [11 favorites]


cool idea, ugly ring.
posted by wayland at 10:35 PM on May 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


Hey now - I'm not going to say this was the best ring of all time, but the vast majority of mid-tier jewellery store rings are far, far uglier than this. Like, even Liberace wouldn't wear this ring. My eyes hurt just looking at that thing. In comparison, this guy's ring should be in the MoMA.
posted by GuyZero at 10:38 PM on May 21, 2013 [11 favorites]


It's just so refreshing that he doesn't call himself a 'Maker'.
posted by Mei's lost sandal at 10:41 PM on May 21, 2013 [15 favorites]


Five months of work and he made the wrong size.

Obviously, the optimal solution would be to acquire another fiancée with a 15.6mm ring finger.
posted by R. Schlock at 10:44 PM on May 21, 2013 [41 favorites]


I love this. I wonder if she is currently crafting wedding dress featuring electro-conductive thread and some kind of light display that responds to music.
posted by chapps at 11:02 PM on May 21, 2013 [3 favorites]


Wow you guys are bitches! If that guy was my prospective fiance*, I would eat ALL OF THE FOOD until my finger fit that ring. That's just amazing!

*He is not, and I'm getting a sapphire. Which does not light up or do any sort of trick.
posted by deep thought sunstar at 11:08 PM on May 21, 2013 [4 favorites]


the issue is that the ring is 0.12mm smaller than required, not larger, sunstar :)

What I liked most was that he maintained Engineering Report Boredom Maximization Style throughout this incredibly exciting project.
posted by Fraxas at 11:13 PM on May 21, 2013 [14 favorites]


It's just so refreshing that he doesn't call himself a 'Maker'.
You are only allowed to call yourself that while making your first five things. I'm guessing this guy has made a few more things than that.
posted by b1tr0t at 11:14 PM on May 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


In case anyone didn't catch it, it does appear that the ring was in fact placed on the finger successfully, so we can wish them well on that as well as the engineering.
posted by BlackLeotardFront at 11:16 PM on May 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Blogs like this make me really wish I could make something like that. And then I stop and think about how I can get myself into trouble making a cup of coffee and I realise that it's probably for the best that I don't try.
posted by Solomon at 11:17 PM on May 21, 2013


Holy crap, here I was thinking I was hot shit for ordering anodized titanium wedding rings with a design that we'd put together ourselves. This guy is kind of amazing overall.
posted by DoctorFedora at 11:24 PM on May 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


That aside, these rings are pretty sweet…
posted by DoctorFedora at 11:36 PM on May 21, 2013


SysRq, looking at it on the lady's hand, that ring looks it has about the same band diameter as my wedding ring, with a lower profile (mine is definitely taller than that on the display side) and I've worn mine 24-7 (apart from when I need to dismantle a chicken or clean the toilet) for more than 10 years. It's all in what you're used to.
posted by gingerest at 11:37 PM on May 21, 2013


What I liked most was that he maintained Engineering Report Boredom Maximization Style throughout this incredibly exciting project.
Ha. When I worked at my father's civil engineering firm, I noticed all the site assessments had a section with the results from the borings we drilled. Plain cover with giant block letters:

BORING REPORT

Cracked me up.
posted by lucidprose at 11:47 PM on May 21, 2013 [23 favorites]


I think it's a great ring, really lovely, and amazing that he took all that trouble to make it for her is adorable.
posted by 5_13_23_42_69_666 at 11:59 PM on May 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Ha. When I worked at my father's civil engineering firm, I noticed all the site assessments had a section with the results from the borings we drilled. Plain cover with giant block letters:

Back when there was such a thing as Yellow Pages, you could look up boring in the phone book, and be greeted with the advice:

BORING - see CIVIL ENGINEERING
posted by Homeboy Trouble at 12:34 AM on May 22, 2013 [13 favorites]


Figure 27 - Armband transmitter

Making a ring is one thing, making an armband transmitter that you wear under your sleeve like Spiderman's web shooters so you can control it, should make this young woman take pause.
posted by three blind mice at 1:14 AM on May 22, 2013 [3 favorites]


I like it. It'll really be a conversation starter when the ring lights up whenever they hold hands.

(Granted, he'll have to wear the "transmitter" all the damn time, which I guess is another sign of commitment...)
posted by OHSnap at 1:36 AM on May 22, 2013


On her had the ring looks about twice as thick as my ring and in the other images it's clear the space under her stones is also a lot deeper, this is an unusually thick ring. Mine has the same straight edges and inset stones, except softer edges because it's a softer metal, and I still struggle with how much it pushes my fingers apart and digs in after 2.5 years of daily wear. So while his ring looks cool enough, I think it would be uncomfortable to wear.

Also he doesn't mention what kind of stones they are but does manage to crush one of them, which makes me think they're made of something fairly soft or brittle. Add in that they're only glued in and they're going to fall out or break eventually. So it's not really made to last.

The titanium does look nice against her skin though, which isn't necessarily a given (it can be kind of weird how different metals change on different people), and I like the lighting up idea. Hopefully his next iteration will address the other issues too.
posted by shelleycat at 1:48 AM on May 22, 2013


Using an o-ring grooving tool, I carve out a 2mm x 1mm cavity within the ring. The shelf will hold the strip of permalloy (which will be explained later) and the space will accommodate the coil/LED assembly.

How romantic!
posted by Red Loop at 2:09 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


More engagement-related engineering geekery, from Reddit a few months back.
posted by markr at 2:40 AM on May 22, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also he doesn't mention what kind of stones they are but does manage to crush one of them, which makes me think they're made of something fairly soft or brittle.

Following our authors lead, "A 75 cm fall under 1 g of acceleration onto a surface with a modulus of elasticity in the 10 to 20 MPa range (e.g. Linoleum) has been observed to coarsely fracture sapphire HPLC pistons under non-controlled conditions."

I believe emerald is worse. A quick Googling suggest diamond might not be much better. The take home message - don't hit precious stones with a hammer and keep a pipette lid box handy to hold parts when you have to replace pump seals.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 4:04 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


What I liked most was that he maintained Engineering Report Boredom Maximization Style...

It's a lot less boring if you (the reader) know how to use the tools but want to know how he created an effect. "Oh, I see. there's an O-ring-like undercut on the inside formed in a collet and then a through-hole with a countersink from the outside to form a seat but also let the light through. Neat."
posted by DU at 4:12 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


BORING REPORT

Cracked me up.


My 12 yo son has been interested in my hobby machine shop and frequently has projects for me to do. (Just completed a prototype "scotch and soda" coin trick for him.) He was also pretty cracked up when I got out the "boring bar" which really is a boring bar, consisting mostly of just a bar with a hole in it.
posted by DU at 4:15 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's a mind-blowing amount of work (including experimentation) to do for something that you're making only for a loved one. IMNSHO, it's all for a kind of cheesy effect, but then again, it's not for me, is it?
posted by Halloween Jack at 4:32 AM on May 22, 2013


The internet: once again proving that whatever you did for your fiancée is just not good enough.
posted by Vindaloo at 4:33 AM on May 22, 2013 [8 favorites]


That's a mind-blowing amount of work (including experimentation) to do for something that you're making only for a loved one.

Seriously. The only things worth doing are things where you get a tiny fraction of a robber baron's profit on it.
posted by DU at 4:45 AM on May 22, 2013 [2 favorites]


If he really loved her, that ring would have a TV-B-Gone embedded in it.
posted by RonButNotStupid at 4:55 AM on May 22, 2013 [2 favorites]


So, how did he give it to her? Did he slide it on and then bring his "transmitter" arm up, or was the ring lit up the entire time he was holding it? Was she terrified that he was some sort of warlock?
posted by orme at 5:40 AM on May 22, 2013


nagging discomfort is probably not something one would want in an engagement ring.

Call it preparation for marriage. *rimshot*

A friend of mine wants to come to NYC to propose to his girl. He wanted to know a good spot to do it. I suggested the 4/5 train at rush hour. Same reason. Zing!
posted by fungible at 5:48 AM on May 22, 2013


He's suffering from Nerd Design Syndrome, in which any plan immediately gets added fillets and curlicues in an attempt to achieve maximal difficulty:

"Hey, I should make a ring for my girlfriend!"

OUT OF TITANIUM.

"Uh, hey, OK, I was thinking of a circle of gems ..."

WHICH LIGHT UP

"Um, I guess that's possible ..."

THE RING WILL BE POWERED BY A WEARABLE INDUCTION COIL.

"I really just want her to have a ring ..."

SILENCE OR THE COIL WILL BE SURGICALLY IMPLANTED.
posted by Joe in Australia at 5:53 AM on May 22, 2013 [33 favorites]


I wish I could be him.

...this, naturally, means that I hate him.
posted by aramaic at 5:57 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


I hope their wedding looks like this one!

also it's a super sweet story and I wish them the best of luck
posted by jetlagaddict at 6:15 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


Guy went to an engineering school (Stanford?) that has a terribly kerned sign.
posted by leotrotsky at 6:18 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


Titanium is a lovely metal for bicycles and a variety of industrial purposes, but I would be uncomfortable using it for jewelry. The typical gold ring, when caught on something, will deform and even rip apart. The same situation with titanium could take your finger with it. The material is just too strong.
posted by dgran at 6:31 AM on May 22, 2013


The world is full of wonderful things and people full of joy. Which is hard to remember most days.
posted by crush-onastick at 6:31 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


The typical gold ring, when caught on something, will deform and even rip apart. The same situation with titanium could take your finger with it.

..or save your life.
posted by kanuck at 6:36 AM on May 22, 2013 [4 favorites]


The typical gold ring, when caught on something, will deform and even rip apart.

I'm having trouble believing that if you attempt to pull a gold ring off a finger, the ring will break before the finger does.
posted by DU at 6:49 AM on May 22, 2013


dgran, that sounds like an urban legend. Has such a thing ever actually happened? Do you know of cases where a titanium ring has caused an injury? Are there even documented cases of gold rings ripping apart?
posted by MrMoonPie at 6:49 AM on May 22, 2013


The one person I know who's lost a finger to a non-industrial accident lost it while falling out of a tree and his gold ring caught. I'm thinking the finger-removing aspect would apply to nearly any metal, not merely titanium.

...on the other hand, when I was looking into custom titanium rings, more than one provider explicitly mentioned they had put break-points into the ring -- but I think that was more so an EMT could cut the ring off if necessary using standard EMT equipment.
posted by aramaic at 7:37 AM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


The typical gold ring, when caught on something, will deform and even rip apart.

Ever been on a working farm? An awful lot of farmers seem to be missing the top half of their ring fingers.
posted by Thorzdad at 7:38 AM on May 22, 2013 [3 favorites]


"...but then again, it's not for me, is it?"

Yep, correct, nailed it.
posted by midmarch snowman at 7:47 AM on May 22, 2013


"Titanium is a lovely metal for bicycles and a variety of industrial purposes, but I would be uncomfortable using it for jewelry. The typical gold ring, when caught on something, will deform and even rip apart. The same situation with titanium could take your finger with it. The material is just too strong."

"The one person I know who's lost a finger to a non-industrial accident lost it while falling out of a tree and his gold ring caught. I'm thinking the finger-removing aspect would apply to nearly any metal, not merely titanium."


I had no idea this was a thing. I am accident prone and I have a titanium wedding ring. [takes off ring and backs away slowly]

Why do you hate my love titanium? WHY?!
posted by Debaser626 at 7:48 AM on May 22, 2013


The one person I know who's lost a finger to a non-industrial accident lost it while falling out of a tree and his gold ring caught. I'm thinking the finger-removing aspect would apply to nearly any metal, not merely titanium.

I didn't even know that men wore wedding rings until I was like 18, because Dad has one in a drawer somewhere but it was always considered more of a love token than a thing he ever actually wore. When I finally realized that the ring street was supposed to go both ways, I asked him why, and he said, "I love your mom, but I love my fingers more."

Admittedly my dad is like the anti-office worker and makes toast with a damn blowtorch so probably for ordinary people the risks are much smaller.
posted by WidgetAlley at 8:17 AM on May 22, 2013 [2 favorites]


I love this guy! He delights me!
posted by Greg Nog at 8:40 AM on May 22, 2013


> I'm having trouble believing that if you attempt to pull a gold ring off a finger, the ring will break before the finger does.

My new jewelry company makes wedding and engagement rings in a variety of sizes and colors out of pure wood pulp and lead! That's right, lead, known to be one of the world's softest metals, it is guaranteed to deform under stress and break, leaving your hands safe, uninjured and intact! To further enhance safety, the core of the rings is made from pure virgin woodpulp, twisted into ribbon-ish shapes to present appealing contours that are certain to catch the envious eyes of all around you!

Now, certainly, there can be no downside to this arrangement! For only $1,400 per ring (plus stone settings; a our range of car lot gravel is available to choose from), you may think, "Ah, but this is not even gold! How can you justify this price?" Safety, friends! Yes, safety -- what price would you put on the safety of your loved ones? How much is your beloved wife or husband's intact hand worth to you, when that hand caresses your face after a long workday being chased by ocelots and pumas through the hedgerows, and that hand faces no risk whatsoever of being injured by their engagement ring being dangerously snagged by twigs or thorns?

Make haste and speak with our sales agents today! Operators are standing by!
posted by ardgedee at 9:18 AM on May 22, 2013


Although I'm a working musician, I have a love for very chunky rings. I recently was able to find a stainless steel signet and a tungsten 12mm pipe-section ring in my size. (Small, for what are considered men's rings).
The stainless steel ring is riskier than the tungsten - stainless steel would have to be cut off, but the tungsten (carbide or nitride, I'm not sure which my ring is) can be broken off with vise-grips! I remove my rings when doing anything highly physical, riding a motorcycle, or playing music. Not only are rings obtrusive visually, but the weight on my right is enough to throw off my bowing, and the left rings are bulky enough to interfere with fingering.
If I could get my rings to light up on my OWN induction field, cool!
posted by Dreidl at 10:28 AM on May 22, 2013


Titanium is a lovely metal for bicycles and a variety of industrial purposes, but I would be uncomfortable using it for jewelry.

I wear a titanium ring on my thumb. At parties I like to show off by opening beer bottles with the edge of the ring, hooking my thumb over the top and lifting. I have done this probably a couple of hundred times now and if you look really closely you can just barely see some faint scratches. Fuck yeah titanium.
posted by Mars Saxman at 10:33 AM on May 22, 2013


Rings are enough of an issue that it is standard to see one of these in every ambulance. Sucks to cut through stainless or Titanium.

(The issue is typically some condition causing swelling in the fingers)
posted by plinth at 10:50 AM on May 22, 2013


It's my understanding that while gold and silver rings are cut and bent open for removal in emergency situations, titanium rings are cracked off. Here's a youtube video demonstrating the technique.
posted by arcolz at 11:31 AM on May 22, 2013 [2 favorites]


The technical term for one type of injury caused by a ring that is stronger than the finger it's attached to degloving. Do not search this on google if, well any reason really.

That's a mind-blowing amount of work (including experimentation) to do for something that you're making only for a loved one.

No kidding, he learned AutoCAD to design this in 3D no less. I'm amazed that itself took him less than three months.
posted by Mitheral at 11:57 AM on May 22, 2013


The typical gold ring, when caught on something, will deform and even rip apart.

There are a whole class of horrifying "don't do this" safety picture that I have far to much empathy for my fellow MeFites digestion to link to here - suffice to say that silver and gold are harder than you are and that there are certain activities that should not be done while wearing jewelry. Anything involving a metal lathe or milling machine is probably items 1 and 2 on that list.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 1:09 PM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


Anything involving a metal lathe or milling machine is probably items 1 and 2 on that list.

I have often wondered if parafilm or a similar product, wrapped tightly and thinly around the offending item, would suffice. Seems like it might prevent any ring-projection from getting caught by covering any gaps, while itself being weak enough to not rip the finger off if it gets caught something spinning.

Not that I want to find out, mind. Just wondering how folks with non-removable rings deal with machine tools. Or do they?
posted by aramaic at 1:16 PM on May 22, 2013


Dick Smith lost a finger to a wedding ring injury. The metacarpal had to be removed, and so he doesn't even have a place for a missing finger any more. He calls his left hand his Mickey Mouse hand.

No word on what his ring was made of.
posted by Mister Moofoo at 5:57 PM on May 22, 2013


I'm having trouble believing that if you attempt to pull a gold ring off a finger, the ring will break before the finger does.

I caught a gold ring on a door latch in the lab many years ago, and managed to stop. I worked the ring off my finger immediately, before my finger started to swell, and plunged my hand into the ice bucket at my bench. The ring cracked in the two places where the haft was thinnest. (It was 14k gold, because for rings you want a harder alloy to minimize scratching and bending - otherwise I think it would have stretched.)(My finger was big and purple for a week or so.)

So the evidence suggests that my ring, anyway, would have broken before or around the same time that my finger was degloved. Hooray for pain receptors, though.
posted by gingerest at 5:58 PM on May 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


The guy who made my titanium wedding ring even says specifically that it's not especially harder than stainless steel to remove from a finger in the event of an emergency. It's not mythril — I mean, they have to be able to use tools to actually cut and engrave and make the rings in the first place, right?
posted by DoctorFedora at 9:59 PM on May 22, 2013


I have often wondered if parafilm or a similar product, wrapped tightly and thinly around the offending item, would suffice.

If it was just getting your ring caught on some projection, maybe. But a lot of the horror stories involve something that would have merely lacerated your hand to begin with only now it's getting the ring in on the act like some sort of industrial accident video game power-up.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 5:17 AM on May 23, 2013


My grandpa (mechanic) and my father in law (carpenter) both had half a ring finger. The rings were both gold.
posted by Sophie1 at 8:27 AM on May 23, 2013


> they have to be able to use tools to actually cut and engrave and make the rings in the first place, right?

Craftspeople and EMTs can't use the same tools. When the ring's on the bench being made, the craftsperson can use clamps to stabilize the saws and drills can overshoot the inner diameter of the ring intentionally, and all the time in the world can be taken to ensure clean machining.

The EMT has specialty equipment that amounts to a Dremel tool and a pair of pliers, and has to get the ring away from the flesh swelling around it as quickly as possible. The only thing in the EMT's favor is that they can disregard the need for precision in handling the ring, as long as the damage to the human is minimal.
posted by ardgedee at 9:21 AM on May 23, 2013


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