Rule-by-princess is the predominant form of government
November 26, 2014 7:14 AM   Subscribe

Adventure Time Forum, The Leading Journal of Adventure Time Research, Commentary, and Analysis released its first issue.

Jonathan Bradley — Princess Politics: “Ooo’s most stable and cosmopolitan societies are, without fail, those governed benevolently by matriarchal monarchies.”

Andrew Crocker and Parker Higgins — “Dog Liver Times 51!”: “Truly, we are experiencing a golden era in Adventure Time zoology.”

Haley Flannery — Daddy, Why Did You Eat My Fries?: “Through the relationships of Marceline, Finn, and Jake, Adventure Time provides a key for how parents should behave toward their children.”

Carly Kocurek — The Consoling Console: “We want our robots human, but we want them to love us, to console and comfort us.”

John Shutt and Thomas Shutt — Music, Magic, and Memory: “What appear to be scraps of cultural ephemera — a receipt with a poem scribbled on it, a beaten-up stuffed animal, a band t-shirt, a sitcom theme song, a Christmas special, or a children's cartoon — can have a power that is felt for generations.”

Heather Smith — Adventure Time and Apocalypse Literature: “Adventure Time is not a classic American apocalypse... Instead, the show is post-post apocalyptic, like a pop art version of the end of the world.”

Eric Thurm — Maturity in Adventure Time: “Adventure Time uses its emotional frequency, genre flexibility, and, perhaps most importantly, its nature as a work of animation to cast light on the ways in which great television series are like children”

Adventure Time returns from hiatus this week, with four new episodes. Join us on FanFare!
posted by 1970s Antihero (24 comments total) 62 users marked this as a favorite
 
Oh man, I hope they discuss box kingdom, toppling of the monarchy and the return to an egalitarian society.
posted by spikeleemajortomdickandharryconnickjrmints at 7:19 AM on November 26, 2014 [7 favorites]


In 1826, Mary Shelley, who had just written Frankenstein, wrote The Last Man, about how, in the years leading up to 2100, a plague breaks out and everyone dies but a guy named Lionel. It was possibly the first work of apocalyptic science fiction, and people hated it. “The offspring of a diseased imagination, and of a most polluted taste," said one reviewer. Shelley was baffled. She really liked the book.
posted by Greg Nog at 7:47 AM on November 26, 2014 [2 favorites]


This. This is the thing. This is the thing I want.
posted by cthuljew at 8:14 AM on November 26, 2014 [3 favorites]


Oh man, I hope they discuss box kingdom, toppling of the monarchy and the return to an egalitarian society.

That episode takes on a whole other dimension when you consider the idea that the boxes are sentient and control the cats as mounts/labor. I mean, who put the water bottle there?
posted by Itaxpica at 8:40 AM on November 26, 2014


That Apocalypse Lit essay is wonderful.
posted by Artw at 8:44 AM on November 26, 2014


Can't wait to read all of these while I should be working this afternoon, thanks for the great post!
posted by dialetheia at 9:46 AM on November 26, 2014


The fact that Adventure Time exists and is popular just boggles my mind - it seems to operate scot orally on my own wavelength that I can't imagine it appealing to anyone else.

I mean this is a cartoon show that dedicates an entire emotional arc to a Candide-like bildungsroman about empathy and the social contract populated entirely by SCREAMING LEMONS.
posted by The Whelk at 9:52 AM on November 26, 2014 [14 favorites]


There are so many crazy things about adventure time that, as an adult, I want to know more about.

What was the actual cause of the apocalypse? How have the physical rules of the universe changed? What is the lich, and why hasn't he (or his kind??) either been already been contained or destroyed the entire universe? Is it like the wheel of time where he already has a million times, and been recaptures a million times? Where does the candy soul come from? Did the different dimensions (esp lumpy space) touch because of the apocalypse? Come to be unified after it? And of course: how does Jake stretch (that is, where does the extra matter come from)?

Anyways, I'm looking forward to reading these in between stretching my own liver over thanksgiving.
posted by Phredward at 10:00 AM on November 26, 2014 [3 favorites]


This is fantastic, thanks. I'm saving up all those new episodes this week to watch in a blast of delirium and eggnog Friday.
posted by fiercecupcake at 10:18 AM on November 26, 2014


SQUEEEEEEEE
posted by stoneweaver at 10:33 AM on November 26, 2014


I think these are happy chills of joy. How have you done this wonderful thing, people?
posted by stoneweaver at 10:36 AM on November 26, 2014


This is relevant to my interests.
posted by bigendian at 11:17 AM on November 26, 2014 [1 favorite]


Oh, man, I just recently started watching Adventure Time on Netflix (binging, of course). I originally tried watching it a few months ago, and it just didn't penetrate my head at the time and seemed to make very little to no sense what so ever.

But now. Now I get it. Now I see it for the nightmare that escaped from the morass of our shared culture, and how it is a beautiful fever dream reflecting all the wonderful horrors of our shared internal group memories.

That and Jake is my homey.
posted by daq at 11:48 AM on November 26, 2014 [2 favorites]


Adventure Time is the source, and continuation, of so many great things. For one thing, it's given me a really aces cartoon to follow that's not PONY. For another, it's given us Pendleton Ward, and we can always use more genuinely kind and decent successful people. And people seem to go on from AT to do great things, like Natasha Allegri's Bee and Puppycat.
posted by JHarris at 12:53 PM on November 26, 2014 [5 favorites]


like Natasha Allegri's

YUP. "Bee and Puppycat" is ridiculously fun.
posted by Ipsifendus at 1:20 PM on November 26, 2014 [1 favorite]


Plus, Hunson Abadeer is such a satisfying name, Lord of Evil status notwithstanding. Hunson Abadeer. Hunson Abadeer.
posted by redsparkler at 3:56 PM on November 26, 2014 [4 favorites]


I second the greatness of Hunson Abadeer's name. I wonder what inspired it?
posted by JHarris at 7:26 PM on November 26, 2014


And of course: how does Jake stretch (that is, where does the extra matter come from)?

This is covered a couple times. There's the one episode with the maze, where he stretches out as far as he can. That is, he doesn't gain mass, he just stretches. And then the one this season "Joshua and Margaret Investigation" where the story of his birth is told.
posted by ArgentCorvid at 8:39 PM on November 26, 2014


Hey if any of you guys like Munchkin, there's an Adventure Time version that is not only specific to the show, but avoids Munchkin's having-awful-art problem. Everyone gets to be a different Adventure Time character with special skills! It's lovely!
posted by Greg Nog at 8:54 PM on November 26, 2014 [1 favorite]


Pretty cool, but an essay about government power in Ooo that doesn't refer to this episode is weak.
posted by robcorr at 10:12 PM on November 26, 2014


...like Natasha Allegri's Bee and Puppycat.

And don't forget Rebecca Sugar's Steven Universe!
posted by cthuljew at 12:59 AM on November 27, 2014 [1 favorite]


Hey if any of you guys like Munchkin, there's an Adventure Time version that is not only specific to the show, but avoids Munchkin's having-awful-art problem.

Munchkin's art is fine for what it is, it's in Kovalic's style after all. Adventure Time Munchkin has good art, but when I played it at DragonCon is was surprisingly not fun, it's like they thought it being a version of the game based on a cartoon was enough and didn't put in the customary humor. (Also not fun, it seems, is Munchkin Pathfinder.)
posted by JHarris at 2:20 AM on November 27, 2014


>That is, he doesn't gain mass, he just stretches.

There's an episode where he gets poisoned and solves it by growing his liver to fifty one times its normal size.
Additionally, he seems to have negligible strength and weight when he shrinks enough to fit in Finn's pocket and be extremely strong and heavy at car size. I think that suggests that he does gain and lose mass, just that there are hard limits to how much he could gain.

But thinking about it this much almost seems like missing the point of Adventure Time. It's not like he's using Pym particles.
posted by sandswipe at 7:33 PM on November 27, 2014




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