It's the 'Dark Side of the Moon’ of holiday favorites
December 18, 2014 7:20 AM   Subscribe

 
Yep. Been there, done that. Why do the MacArthur people continue to overlook my prescience and insights? Why?

And yes, Vince Guaraldi is an underappreciated culture hero.
posted by Naberius at 7:33 AM on December 18, 2014 [6 favorites]


Great article. "Bill Evans with a smile" is the best description of Guaraldi I've ever heard.

Got to the end of the article before I realized it was written by musician Mike Errico, who has made some truly great songs (like this one).
posted by jbickers at 7:36 AM on December 18, 2014 [3 favorites]


Ah man, the playlist of non Peanuts stuff by Guaraldi is also awesome. You have saved my workday!
posted by Naberius at 7:42 AM on December 18, 2014 [1 favorite]


My kids loaded this into the minivan DVD player the other week and it's been on constant loop. But I can't see the video, only hear the (excellent) music and (awful) dialogue. This article is spot on.

But man have my fond Gen-X memories of this show have been ruined now that I've had time to get the actual story out of the dialogue. The only reason we loved this show was because it was a cartoon that was on after dinner. That has to be it. Because these kids are assholes in need of 1950s-level psychotherapy.
posted by JoeZydeco at 7:47 AM on December 18, 2014 [4 favorites]


I tried to rewatch it a year ago, and I was stunned by the slow pacing, the awkwardness of the animation, of whole dead beats of emptiness. Obviously pacing and such has changed in the decades since, but it's become pretty much unwatchable to me.
posted by Ghidorah at 7:48 AM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


It's 22 minutes long. How fast does the pacing need to be?
posted by octothorpe at 7:50 AM on December 18, 2014 [22 favorites]


dicks and balls and beer
dicks and balls and beer
the fire's warm
the perfect storm
dicks and balls and beer
posted by maus at 7:52 AM on December 18, 2014 [3 favorites]


I'm okay with it not being that fast, but there's also zero furiousness. I mean, it's like they're not even trying to build a franchise here.
posted by Etrigan at 7:53 AM on December 18, 2014 [19 favorites]


Love it. Still.

Out of all the Christmas specials I saw when I was a kid, this is the only one my son latched on to. He won't watch the Rankin/Bass specials, not even Rudolph, but the Charlie Brown special is a holiday staple, as are the Thanksgiving and Halloween ones.

But yeah, those kids are all jerks and Chuck needs some meds and therapy that costs more than a nickle.
posted by bondcliff at 7:53 AM on December 18, 2014 [4 favorites]


Vince Guaraldi is a treasure. I suspect his music would make even a root canal tolerable.
posted by blurker at 7:53 AM on December 18, 2014 [3 favorites]


Well, I don't know what this guy and all the rest of y'all haters are on about, because I love this special and always have. Tuesday was the 42nd year in a row that I watched the broadcast of A Charlie Brown Christmas, accompanied by the stuffed Snoopy that I have had since I was two, and it is one of the few traditions I do not skip.

Point of order: Charlie Brown is not happy at the end because, like the article claims, "the rest of the gang is dressing his tree up to look like everything he hates". Charlie Brown is happy at the end because, by decorating the tree he'd gotten and they'd previously scorned, they were admitting they were wrong - and that a tree didn't need to be big and shiny and aluminum and pre-fab to be fantastic, all it needed was some care and some tending and it was just fine, even better, then the painted-pink one Lucy had wanted. And he's also happy because they did it to surprise him.

Years ago I wrote a column in my college student paper, and far and away the one column I did that got the most comments from readers was about A Charlie Brown Christmas; I speculated that it had such a devoted following in the dorms' TV rooms because that kind of vibe is what we were all going through, all us students racing to finish our exams and celebrate a bit before we all scattered home to our families for winter break. "It's about a bunch of friends who get together to try to do something special for Christmas, and they realize that them all just being together is already something special."

That's what Christmas is all about, Charlie Brown.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 7:56 AM on December 18, 2014 [72 favorites]


Vince Guaraldi

I knew this was the answer without even reading the article.

Bill Evans with a smile

A lot of Bill Evans music seems fairly cheerful by Jazz standards (no pun intended) so I'm not sure what this means? I think Guaraldi sometimes has a more straightforward and energetic tone.

I love the Charlie Brown specials BECAUSE of the dreamlike pace.
posted by selfnoise at 7:56 AM on December 18, 2014 [4 favorites]


Obviously pacing and such has changed in the decades since, but it's become pretty much unwatchable to me.

It's about the same pace as the average Mr. Rogers episode, do you also dislike those?
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 7:57 AM on December 18, 2014 [1 favorite]


and (awful) dialogue

It sounds like it's being spoken by hostages held at gunpoint, it creeped me out even as a kid.
posted by poffin boffin at 7:59 AM on December 18, 2014 [3 favorites]


I haven't read the article, but this is about how Vince Guaraldi is awesome, yes?


Because that is correct.
posted by louche mustachio at 8:00 AM on December 18, 2014 [5 favorites]


Rankin/Bass is some hands-down creepy shit.
posted by gottabefunky at 8:01 AM on December 18, 2014 [3 favorites]


Ever see reruns of "Family Affair"? It too has weird pregnant pauses and reaction shots, much like the Charlie Brown Xmas Special. I think TV about and for kids was just like that back in the 60s. Personally as a 44 year old, I can't take much of the frantic kids stuff that's around these days, like Madagascar and the like.
posted by jeff-o-matic at 8:03 AM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


If you like Peanuts, you already accept that Charlie Brown is depressed, that Lucy is an asshole, that kids are cruel and sometimes dogs aren't really your best friend (though they can be entertaining).

On TV, 1965 was still a time of glurge and white people singing cheesy choruses and Lassie saving stupid little adorable children from wells, and I have always assumed Peanuts was popular because it peeled all that back and pointed out that real life was far darker and weirder.

The music definitely makes it work in a way it wouldn't otherwise, I won't argue with him about that.
posted by emjaybee at 8:04 AM on December 18, 2014 [22 favorites]


A point of order about how weird the dialogue sounds sometimes - a handful of the kids they got for the voice acting couldn't read, so what they had to do was have the director feed them their lines sentence by sentence. The choppy effect is from that piecemeal approach. Sally is the biggest example.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:08 AM on December 18, 2014 [6 favorites]


Because it's one of the greatest pieces of pop art 20th century America ever produced.
posted by octobersurprise at 8:11 AM on December 18, 2014 [5 favorites]


Personally as a 44 year old, I can't take much of the frantic kids stuff that's around these days, like Madagascar and the like.

Yeah, as a 51-year-old, much of the new kids' tv I happen to come across honestly seems like a bad drug trip to me. (During #getoffmylawn moods I despair and wonder what the fuck this stuff is doing to kids, the other times I just think, "whoa, so very not for me.")

But almost always when one of my nephews is inexplicably behaving like a hallucinating jackass on speed it's really that he's acting out something from a popular kids tv show or movie he and his friends are really into.
posted by aught at 8:16 AM on December 18, 2014 [9 favorites]


It's the 'Dark Side of the Moon’ of holiday favorites

I hear that if you start "Dark Side of the Moon" at the beginning of the cartoon, just as the vocal starts in "The Great Gig in the Sky", Charlie Brown "kills" his tree.
posted by Greg_Ace at 8:19 AM on December 18, 2014 [8 favorites]


A true Christmas miracle would've been if Charlie Brown told all those assholes off and then went on a date with the little red haired girl. Instead, all that black magic was wasted on those little shits' momentary enjoyment of an embiggened totem in his desperate attempt at winning social acceptance.
posted by Invisible Green Time-Lapse Peloton at 8:22 AM on December 18, 2014 [1 favorite]


It sounds like it's being spoken by hostages held at gunpoint, it creeped me out even as a kid.

I thought similarly for a long time but the more actual children I meet and the more I watch home movies of myself and my siblings as kids I realize that's just kind of how kids sound when you cut out the surrealist babbling that makes up 95% of what kids say.
posted by We put our faith in Blast Hardcheese at 8:23 AM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


It's weird that he doesn't mention the Charlie Brown Thanksgiving special which is great for all the same reasons.
posted by straight at 8:26 AM on December 18, 2014 [1 favorite]


"It sounds like it's being spoken by hostages held at gunpoint, it creeped me out even as a kid."

I think the voice parts were redubbed with different actors in a lot of those Charlie Brown specials sometime in the 70's, and maybe again since then. Lucy's original voice was a bit part actor (who I sort of had a crush on) on TV at the time and I distinctly remember it changing sometime back when I was still watching them yearly.
posted by klarck at 8:30 AM on December 18, 2014


But yeah, those kids are all jerks and Chuck needs some meds and therapy that costs more than a nickle.

Yes, and today's helicopter parenting, where we sue someone whenever our precious child skins a knee, is so much better.
posted by Melismata at 8:35 AM on December 18, 2014


I have always assumed Peanuts was popular because it peeled all that back and pointed out that real life was far darker and weirder.

Yeah, that was my take while reading the article - Peanuts always had a feel of authenticity to me because it captured the fact that life was strange, and the people around you capable of both kindness and cruelty. That sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, but more often life doesn't give you a clean outcome. So I'm ok with the muddled emotional tone of the Peanuts and the Charlie Brown Christmas Special.

The music is awesome, and watching the special again this week I noted the odd pauses and moments of stillness - I didn't mind them, but I think it was the incredibly static nature of them (due to the nature of animation 50 years ago) that really draws attention now.
posted by nubs at 8:39 AM on December 18, 2014 [4 favorites]


I don’t understand how anyone can be forced to sit through Linus’ long draining pace-killing Jesus sermon 450 times, which is the turning point of the conflict in the piece, and come away thinking the intended message of the movie is a celebration of the commercialization of Christmas.
posted by edbles at 8:39 AM on December 18, 2014 [10 favorites]


We used to have the book about Lee Mendelson putting together the show. There was a fair amount of what I thought were fairly inspired production decisions: A jazz soundtrack? Kids doing the voice-overs instead of having adult voice actors fake it? An entire minute of a text from the New Testament recited on prime time?

The TV Network was totally freaking out. It's a miracle it went on the way it did.
posted by ovvl at 8:40 AM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


By the way, I watched both the edited and non-edited versions this year on ABC. My God. They fucking BUTCHERED it. They cut everything. They cut Sally writing to Santa Claus. They cut poor Shermy's only line. They cut the entire sequence of Schroeder playing Für Elise and Jingle Bells. Someone in the comments wrote, "why don't they just cut Linus's sermon at the end too? That's the most un-PC part of the whole thing, after all!"

Maybe they've butchered it this much in other years, I just only noticed it this year.
posted by Melismata at 8:43 AM on December 18, 2014 [3 favorites]


They've been cutting things out to allow for commercials for a while now. That's why they had the un-edited version later, and had to follow it up with the super-short cartoons for an extra 20 minutes - putting in the number of commercials they do nowadays put things to 40 minutes of airtime.

I blame a big eastern syndicate.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:50 AM on December 18, 2014 [12 favorites]


Back in the 70's and early 80's, the chief attraction of the Charlie Brown Christmas special growing up was that it only came on once a year, and it came on after dinner.

It's mind-blowing to consider how much content is now available at any time. When I was a kid in the 70's I used to hope and pray there would be a program on when I turned on the television about Great White sharks. That's all I lived for. And my dreams might come true maybe once a year. Now of course I can watch jumping Great Whites, Great Whites eating baby seals, Great Whites eating the rotting carcasses of whales, Great Whites swimming around kelp forests, all that sort of thing.

The Charlie Brown Christmas special does have a certain charm, but as a kid I would have watched anything animated, really.
posted by Nevin at 8:51 AM on December 18, 2014 [1 favorite]


Yes, and today's helicopter parenting, where we sue someone whenever our precious child skins a knee, is so much better.

I wish my kid had more than two knees. Daddy needs a new boat.
posted by bondcliff at 8:56 AM on December 18, 2014 [4 favorites]


To me, the thing that makes the Charlie Brown Christmas Special so appealing is that it captures the mixture of melancholy and joy that the season has.
posted by drezdn at 8:59 AM on December 18, 2014 [4 favorites]


Actually, I've never seen it.
posted by MartinWisse at 9:01 AM on December 18, 2014


YOU GUYS, can you imagine the supergroup that Guaraldi, John Costa, and Joe Raposo could have been!??!?!


Of course it was Guaraldi, that music was amazing. It was the music that had me excited for most of these shows. I looked forward more to Rudolph (Team HERMEY!) and the Grinch as a child, but A Charlie Brown Christmas was in the Top 5. It's been so long since I've seen any of those, though; gosh, it's literally been decades. Do they still show these on CBS during the 2nd/3rd week of December? Sponsored by Dolly Madison snacks? I'm sure they've long retired the cool Special intro, with the kick-ass music from Hawaii 5-0.

I still want to punch Lucy in the mouth, though.
posted by droplet at 9:02 AM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


Actually, I've never seen it.

smite the unbeliever
posted by poffin boffin at 9:02 AM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


Parent Mad 6-Year-Old Didn't Like Peanuts Special
ROSE HILL, VA—Bruce Pillard, 34, was angered Tuesday over his 6-year-old daughter's indifferent reaction to A Charlie Brown Christmas. "That show is a classic and an annual tradition!" an incensed Pillard told daughter Courtney after watching the program on CBS. "It is not 'boring,' and the voices do not sound 'weird.' What the hell is wrong with you?" Courtney was sent to her room for the remainder of the evening.
posted by Rhaomi at 9:06 AM on December 18, 2014 [8 favorites]


About ten years back, when IMDB had polls on its front page (don't bother following their polls since), they asked which was the best Christmas special. After about 20,000 votes, The Grinch Who Stole Christmas won over Charlie Brown Christmas Special by one vote. As it should.
posted by dances_with_sneetches at 9:11 AM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


The voice work is superlative and is a HUGE part of why it rocks. Anyone who thinks it'd be better with that nauseating uberpro adults-doing-kid-voices nonsense is insane. The...odd pausesand—hitch- - -es are as glorious as Gator telling Aunt Ida that he's going to leave and get a job in the auto inDUSTry.
posted by sonascope at 9:15 AM on December 18, 2014 [9 favorites]


I don’t understand how anyone can be forced to sit through Linus’ long draining pace-killing Jesus sermon 450 times, which is the turning point of the conflict in the piece, and come away thinking the intended message of the movie is a celebration of the commercialization of Christmas.

Linus' recitation of scripture is my favorite moment of the show, and contains the best subtle touch of genius: just as he quotes the angel saying "Fear not!" Linus drops his security blanket. He tosses it to the side and leaves it on the floor for the rest of his monologue. I absolutely love that moment. For a little while, he inhabits the story. He hears the message and it changes him.
posted by Pater Aletheias at 9:20 AM on December 18, 2014 [30 favorites]


Simply put, the Charlie Brown Christmas Special is charming BECAUSE of its rough edges, not in spite of them.
posted by entropicamericana at 9:20 AM on December 18, 2014 [8 favorites]


Regarding the fast paced nature of today's television not appealing to kids today

So last night my kids were sort of a mess and I wasn't feeling well and my wife had to go to work. Dinner was a reheated meatloaf from a few days ago, milk, carrot sticks, and hummus for them - really not messy stuff.

There are nights when the kids want to watch a modern 'educational' show and very few of them are good because they wire them up and they are bouncing out of their chairs at the art table in the play room. But, feeling unwell - I acquiesced to dinner in front of a television. I flipped through Amazon Prime for something that wouldn't cause me headaches one way or another and found "Reading Rainbow Classics" which is apparently 16 or so curated 'best of' episodes. The only real change is that they overwrote the original title sequence with their mid 90's revamp which makes one of the episodes a little incongruous since they talk to the guy that recorded the theme song.

So here's the thing. Never - not once - not with the muppet show, not with fraggle rock, not with sesame street, or even a few targeted episodes of Mr. Rogers have my kids been simultaneously enthralled and able to keep eating their dinner. The times that they were most enthralled were the stilted paced stories and the awkward kids book recommendations.

My kids also have a whole list of books now that they'd like to read. And my Son wants us to download some new fangled app for Reading Rainbow. One of those two things will happen, and it won't be the one that requires technology.
posted by Nanukthedog at 9:20 AM on December 18, 2014 [4 favorites]



Vince Guaraldi is a treasure. I suspect his music would make even a root canal tolerable.


I can attest to this. We had VG playing all morning yesterday, and it certainly made performing a root canal much more tolerable than most of the holiday mixes we listen to this time of year!
posted by OHenryPacey at 9:36 AM on December 18, 2014 [5 favorites]


The polished sameness of today's cartoons is what drives me crazy. The same gags, the same plot structures, the same jokes, even the same voices -- either John Ratzenberger or some guy who sounds like John Ratzenberger has voiced a character in every single animated film since the 80s. Even the good ones have basically the same tone that distinguishes the modern cartoon feature -- the snarky, smirking tone with the winking jokes for the parents, the pop culture references. And of course the ultra-earnest, sentimental third act -- blech. The tragedy is that the visual style of (the best of) these films is becoming more and more sophisticated and artistically interesting, so I would actually watch more of them if they weren't so tediously generic otherwise.
posted by El Sabor Asiatico at 9:46 AM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


Oh lord, a root canal accompanied by Christmas music? I would be all stabby for days.
posted by malocchio at 9:48 AM on December 18, 2014


Also, the punk who write this shitty article has zero understanding of A Charlie Brown Christmas. I'm sorry your kid made you watch it 450 times, but apparently 450 viewings weren't enough to give you anything interesting to say about it.

This is where Charles Schulz, Lee Mendelson and Bill Melendez step out from behind a movie standee and confirm what I just said before giving this melon farmer a righteous beatdown.
posted by El Sabor Asiatico at 9:59 AM on December 18, 2014 [7 favorites]


Charles Schulz wouldn't have given anyone a beatdown. The most he'd do is look real sad and say "well, I'm really disappointed in you, I must say."
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 10:01 AM on December 18, 2014 [7 favorites]


When I was quite young, I discovered that if you learned the name of a song, you could hear it whenever you wanted.

It's called "Linus and Lucy."
posted by the Real Dan at 10:01 AM on December 18, 2014 [3 favorites]


In fact, now that I almost have it memorized, I can say with authority that the Peanuts characters are all horrible people.

Linus is not a horrible person.
posted by Atom Eyes at 10:25 AM on December 18, 2014 [8 favorites]


Nor is 5. We're so lucky, we get to see 5 (and his sisters, 3 and 4) dancing, every year. Admit it -- at some point, you've emulated 5's dance moves.
posted by Rash at 10:37 AM on December 18, 2014 [4 favorites]


I reject the premise of the post.

I finally watched the special for the first time ever a few years ago. It made me feel physically ill.
posted by asterix at 10:39 AM on December 18, 2014 [1 favorite]


Several years ago we were at a wedding in late September in Minneapolis. At the dinner/dance, there was a jazz piano trio playing. Midway into the dance it occurred to my wife that "hey, I bet they could do that Charlie Brown song. Go request it." I knew better than to argue so I went to the pianist and said, "I have a request. It's a little embarrassing but um...can you do 'Linus and Lucy'". She smiled and hammered out the main theme. "Oh, we can so do that one." And so, a few songs later, they swung into it. It was a freaking mob on the dance floor. There was a guy with us in his early twenties who absolutely had all the dance moves from the cartoon down, including the Snoopy dance and he tore through them all. That little jazz trio had the biggest smiles on their faces when they were done.
posted by Ber at 10:47 AM on December 18, 2014 [18 favorites]


Re: the slap of realism regarding the cruelty of children and bleakness of childhood that this gave primetime America way back when (full disclosure: I watched it the nght it premiered), I can only point to the Rankin-Bass Rudolph as a childhood TV staple so bleak that it makes ACBC feel like a cool hand on a fevered brow.

The oppressive parental pressure to conform, the betrayal by every authority figure, the peer rejection, the hypocrisy of love and acceptance prompted by need—how Rudolph refrains from tearing shit up in Christmastown when he returns with Yukon C. and Hermey (whose brutal defanging of the Abominable ranks among the most sadistic acts ever on children's television) is beyond me.

Needless to say, it, ACBC and Grinch are my three animated Christmas go-tos.
posted by the sobsister at 10:56 AM on December 18, 2014 [7 favorites]


Oh, and more to the point of this posting, I'll nth the VG love. This is my favorite Christmas album ever.
posted by the sobsister at 10:57 AM on December 18, 2014


Wow, that guy's a crazy good writer.
posted by freecellwizard at 11:02 AM on December 18, 2014


I would submit for your approval another MeFi favorite for a Christmas jazz album, Christmas with The Believers.
posted by Ber at 11:03 AM on December 18, 2014




Followup to my earlier comment:

... but ... I don't agree with him about the dialogue and characters. The awkwardness is part of what makes it great. I love Vince Guaraldi though, and the author's comments about how the music elevates the show are spot-on.
posted by freecellwizard at 11:29 AM on December 18, 2014 [1 favorite]


Every couple of years, some blogger will hack out an essay with almost this identical premise, as if he/she were the first person ever to realize that A Charlie Brown Christmas is [gasp!] somewhat melancholy in tone and that the child actors' line deliveries are a bit less-than-polished and that Guaraldi's music carries a good deal of the emotional weight of the program and that the characters are flawed creatures who talk like Woody Allen on the psychiatrist couch. (As if most of us didn't already know all of this from repeated childhood viewings, and as if this laundry list of supposed faults aren't the very things that make the special special.)
posted by Atom Eyes at 12:24 PM on December 18, 2014 [5 favorites]


Question for all of those in this thread who can't dig A Charlie Brown Christmas: Just when did you join Al Qaeda?

I'm kidding, of course. But I admit to being taken by surprise by some of the negative reactions here. Not that I expect everyone to automatically love it, but still....
posted by Greg_Ace at 12:37 PM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


Sometimes it's good to poke the juggernaut.
posted by Invisible Green Time-Lapse Peloton at 12:48 PM on December 18, 2014


If we're talking about juggernauts, what should really be poked and punched in the nose are all those 1960s Rankin/Bass animated Xmas cartoons. Talk about irritating and nails-on-the-chalkboard ..... sheesh!
posted by blucevalo at 1:15 PM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


Really -- completely agree with gottabefunky on that.
posted by Rash at 1:51 PM on December 18, 2014


Re: the slap of realism regarding the cruelty of children and bleakness of childhood that this gave primetime America way back when (full disclosure: I watched it the nght it premiered), I can only point to the Rankin-Bass Rudolph as a childhood TV staple so bleak that it makes ACBC feel like a cool hand on a fevered brow.

The oppressive parental pressure to conform, the betrayal by every authority figure, the peer rejection, the hypocrisy of love and acceptance prompted by need—how Rudolph refrains from tearing shit up in Christmastown when he returns with Yukon C. and Hermey (whose brutal defanging of the Abominable ranks among the most sadistic acts ever on children's television) is beyond me.

Needless to say, it, ACBC and Grinch are my three animated Christmas go-tos.


THIS.

If we're talking about juggernauts, what should really be poked and punched in the nose are all those 1960s Rankin/Bass animated Xmas cartoons. Talk about irritating and nails-on-the-chalkboard ..... sheesh!

You clearly have not re-watched the epic capitalist propaganda piece that is Santa Claus is Coming to Town

These movies themes are fascinating and incredibly disturbing when you watch them as an adult, because they are so blatant as an adult and some imperceptible to children.

Santa Claus is Coming to Town:

-Capitalism triumphs over communism as Santa Claus who is styled as a good old boy brings children consumerist goods. It's clearly set in a metaphor for East and West Germany.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer:

-Adults and children employed at Santa's workshop (including and especially SANTA) ostracize to the point of banishment which we are informed is deadly in the north pole a reindeer with an obvious physical deformity, an exceptionally fey elf (read: gay), and a miner with a mental illness (OCD has to constantly lick mining pick), only to be accepted when the misfits prove they might have some utility to the society at large, not because the society recognize the essential humanity (reindeeranity?) of all it's members. (And actually in light of sobsister's interpretation perform an act of violence on an even more hated member of society).

Frosty:

EVERYTHING YOU LOVE WILL EVENTUALLY DIE.
posted by edbles at 2:22 PM on December 18, 2014 [5 favorites]


They really don't blandish graphics like they used to.
posted by condour75 at 8:54 PM on December 18, 2014 [2 favorites]


What is the top picture of the article from? (Linus is pulling a sled with Snoopy on it.)

Surely the many many times that I've watched the Charlie Brown Christmas Special, I haven't missed it, have I?
posted by dukes909 at 5:37 AM on December 19, 2014


dukes909, I think it's from the 2003 special I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown.
posted by straight at 2:41 PM on December 19, 2014 [1 favorite]


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