Here's to more aural deliciousness in 2015!
January 9, 2015 10:20 AM   Subscribe

10 Food Podcasts to Listen to in 2015. (slTheKitchn)

The only one of these I've listened to regularly is Spilled Milk, hosted by Molly Wizenberg of Orangette fame and Matthew Amster-Burton of Roots and Grubs (who was written books about feeding his adorable daughter interesting foodstuffs).
posted by Kitteh (16 comments total) 41 users marked this as a favorite
 
I have an eleventh!

The Masters of Social Gastronomy podcast is more about the history and science behind various foods (and one of the two behind it is a MeFite). Their last one was all about Chinese takeout, and damned if I didn't have this enormous craving for takeout when I was done listening to it.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 10:34 AM on January 9, 2015 [7 favorites]


Just in time for a road trip I'm leaving on tomorrow, thanks!
posted by Fig at 10:35 AM on January 9, 2015


If you're in the LA area, KCRW's Good Food show, hosted by Evan Kleiman, and accompanying (short) Good Food on the Road with LA Times food critic Jonathan Gold are both great.
posted by Celsius1414 at 10:42 AM on January 9, 2015


Digging into my iTunes, here are a couple others:

Gastropod "food through the lens of science and history"

LA Foodie Podcast
posted by Celsius1414 at 10:46 AM on January 9, 2015 [2 favorites]


My go-to podcasts:

Food Programme: Contemporary trends in eating, deep histories of food, and occasional forays into twee British eating habits

The Kitchen Cabinet: A panel show, each recorded in a different region of England, typically addressing regional food specialties, which somehow the panel always manages to turn into Spanish, Japanese, or Medieval versions.

KCRW's Good Food: My source for LA foody trends, but made impossibly entertaining by the fact that Pulitzer Prize-winner Jonathan Gold always seems to have just eaten insects and brain cooked in spinal fluid, which he treats as something every food lover is doing just now.

Fugitive Waves by The Kitchen Sisters: Not always about food, but, when it is, they're just the best. Stories of Medieval dogs bread to turn spits, Russian communal kitchens during the Soviet years, and the amazing story of Eel Pie Island.
posted by maxsparber at 10:59 AM on January 9, 2015 [3 favorites]


More food for my ears! Thanks!
posted by rtha at 11:04 AM on January 9, 2015


oh, I'm blind Celsius1414 beat me to it -- but another vote for Gastropod!
posted by kmkrebs at 11:05 AM on January 9, 2015


I like the Kitchen Cabinet too, but mostly because I have an innate fondness for Jay Rayner.
posted by Kitteh at 11:11 AM on January 9, 2015


The Kitchen Cabinet: A panel show, each recorded in a different region of England, typically addressing regional food specialties, which somehow the panel always manages to turn into Spanish, Japanese, or Medieval versions.

This description is so amazing, it's like someone made a podcast out of a really good fever dream I had.

I love Spilled Milk enough that I will shout and la-la-la my way through my misophonia since there's usually only a minute or two of chompy mouth food garbage noise. (But I wish they'd stop.)
posted by Lyn Never at 11:30 AM on January 9, 2015


In addition to the Food Programme and the Kitchen Cabinet, which I love, there's Cook the Perfect…, which is the cooking segment from BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour.

Gravy from the Southern Foodways Alliance is new and well done.
posted by Lexica at 11:52 AM on January 9, 2015


I am adding American Food Roots to the list, and also commenting so as not to miss any more delicious podcasts.
posted by Miko at 12:02 PM on January 9, 2015


The America's Test Kitchen podcast makes Chris Kimball seem like someone a person could stand to be around, which is rather a remarkable feat. But even if you find him irredeemably insufferable, the q&a sections with Bridget Lancaster are usually pretty great, I've picked up a couple tips from there.
posted by Diablevert at 1:31 PM on January 9, 2015 [2 favorites]


I can't believe the America's Test Kitchen podcast is free. I mean, I'm all about content providers making money for their work, but Christopher Kimball's enterprises all seem so heavily geared towards monetization that this seems unusual.
posted by slogger at 1:43 PM on January 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


For a rather different cooking podcast, try Cooking Issues. I've listened to them all and enjoyed almost off of it. I'll have to try a couple of these too!
posted by Bovine Love at 1:51 PM on January 9, 2015


I can't believe the America's Test Kitchen podcast is free.

I agree, and if it were only a podcast I bet it wouldn't be. But it's a public radio show, too, that's an offshoot of the TV show. Right now it's distributed by PRX and offered free to rebroadcasting stations, but it looks like that ends in January 2015, at which point they may start charging subscription fees to the stations which is how shows like that make money. But in a sense I think both the TV and radio shows are basically loss leaders/reputation makers for Cook's Illustrated and Cook's Country.
posted by Miko at 2:09 PM on January 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


But even if you find him irredeemably insufferable, the q&a sections with Bridget Lancaster are usually pretty great...

My mom gives me every season of the TV show for Christmas each year. Bridget and Julia are the best part of that show. They make me want to spend a day cooking with them. I don't hate on Kimball the way many do, but I really enjoy watching them needle him. Kimball's got a chef's ego, and you can tell they love poking at it.
posted by middleclasstool at 6:39 AM on January 10, 2015


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