The Dukes of Hazzard
January 14, 2015 7:20 PM   Subscribe

This project analyzes The Dukes of Hazzard as a representation of the contemporary white southern working class and its validity, and how this characterization fed the appetites of both Southerners and non-Southerners alike in the early 1980s.

On January 26, 1979, CBS aired for the first time The Dukes of Hazzard as a pinch-hit replacement for a midseason flop. Six years and 147 episodes later, the series concluded its run as one of the most successful television shows of its era, ranking consistently in the Nielsen top 10 and reaping millions of dollars for Warner Brothers in licensing fees.
More than a decade after they made their last episode, the extended Duke family remains an icon of pop culture. Their infamous 1969 Dodge Charger, the General Lee, is as familiar to the average American 20-year old as a Coke can or the Nike Swoosh symbol. One member of the cast, Ben Jones, even managed to cash in on his role as Cooter with a four-year stint in the United States Congress. The Duke phenomenon may have come as a surprise to its producers and CBS, but given the social situation in the United States at the time, it should only have been expected. The show had been originaly slated for eight episodes, but when the show skyrocketed to the top of the Nielsen ratings, its critics at CBS and Warner Brothers had no other choice but to leave The Dukes on. The Dukes may not have been the only Southern rural sitcom to appear on television, but it met with the most all around success and resurrected the Southern outlaw-hero from the dust that it lay in after the 1960s.
posted by josher71 (73 comments total) 18 users marked this as a favorite
 
Something I learned from Dynamite! magazine: the show went through several General Lees in each episode. Every time we saw Bo and Luke jumping the car over some obstacle, in the real world it ended in automotive destruction. That's why you never saw them jump and land in the same shot.
posted by Harvey Kilobit at 7:29 PM on January 14, 2015 [6 favorites]


TMTOTH award?
posted by Melismata at 7:32 PM on January 14, 2015 [1 favorite]


Every time we saw Bo and Luke jumping the car over some obstacle, in the real world it ended in automotive destruction. That's why you never saw them jump and land in the same shot.

You could even see the car bend on landing.
posted by srboisvert at 7:39 PM on January 14, 2015 [2 favorites]


Enos, you got your ears on Enos?
posted by fallingbadgers at 7:41 PM on January 14, 2015


I did love jumping into my family car through the window, which annoyed my parents. (I was around 10).
posted by jonmc at 7:42 PM on January 14, 2015 [16 favorites]


In college, there was guy who bought and drove around daily one of the General Lee's, complete with welded doors. He was legendary around campus...kids of the early 80's identify with that car.

On preview...It's ENIS...like penis without the "P". (at least phonetically)
posted by Benway at 7:47 PM on January 14, 2015


It might be pronounced that way, but it is spelled Enos.
posted by hwyengr at 7:50 PM on January 14, 2015


Even to an English schoolboy, Hazzard County looked an awful lot like Walnut Grove from Little House on the Prairie. I don't think I ever bought into Dukes of Hazzard as an accurate representation of the white southern working class.
posted by Flashman at 7:54 PM on January 14, 2015 [4 favorites]


It might be pronounced that way, but it is spelled Enos.

Which you would know if you had watched the Enos spinoff series, as my family did.
posted by Pater Aletheias at 7:56 PM on January 14, 2015 [7 favorites]


v important link
posted by poffin boffin at 7:59 PM on January 14, 2015 [1 favorite]


One of the reasons we can't dismiss the Dukes, despite the distressing "Lost Cause" revanchist bullshit strewn about it, is that one of the villains was black.

Sheriff Little, from Chickasaw County. The Duke Boys were NOT PERMITTED to enter his county, and he was smarter, stronger and tougher than Sheriff Roscoe P. Coltrane, and Bo and Luke would get this sick, uneasy look on their face when they realized he was in the car chasing them. (A cop-spec Plymouth Fury with the 440 big block)

Sheriff Little was incorruptible. He was the representative of a society that worked. The reason the Dukes weren't allowed in his county is that they were a public menace, and they were. Their antics in Hazard were necessary to fight evil, in Chickasaw, they were just dangers to the public, and they knew it.

Coltrane and Hogg weren't allowed in, either. He liked Enos, tho.
posted by Slap*Happy at 8:03 PM on January 14, 2015 [30 favorites]


[Ben Jones] lost in the 1992 election, when he faced off against Newt Gingrich after the two incumbents' seats were combined during reapportionment.

I want a glimpse of the world we missed, the one where Gingrich was squeezed out of the House by the mechanic from Dukes of Hazzard just as the Clinton years began.
posted by Iridic at 8:03 PM on January 14, 2015 [23 favorites]


Good thing the General Lee didn't have airbags.
posted by Invisible Green Time-Lapse Peloton at 8:09 PM on January 14, 2015 [2 favorites]


Sheriff Little.
posted by josher71 at 8:10 PM on January 14, 2015


My affection for this show is one those awkward intersections where my socially and racially conscious liberal adult self comes into direct conflict with my hillbilly inner child that loves the hell out of cool cars, troublemaking boys with good hair, and Waylon. I can still watch the show and for some brief moments have a joyful happiness at a completely absurd car chase surrounded by the awareness of exactly why this show appealed to so many people at the time.
Much like knowing all the words to Sweet Home Alabama, it is indoctrination at its finest. Sneaky and couched in "good clean fun", but still supporting a system of systematic racism and oppression.

Although I did learn a valuable lessons from the Duke boys, cops are almost always crooked as shit and girls can drive, too.
posted by teleri025 at 8:12 PM on January 14, 2015 [5 favorites]


Coot-coot-coot.
posted by clavdivs at 8:14 PM on January 14, 2015


Dukes Drinking Game
posted by josher71 at 8:16 PM on January 14, 2015 [1 favorite]


I did love jumping into my family car through the window, which annoyed my parents. (I was around 10).

My brother and one of the neighbor kids were once playing "Dukes of Hazzard" and climbing around their (parked) pickup truck, and the neighbor kid tried the "slide across the hood and then jump through the window" thing - and fell off and broke his arm. And that's when our parents all started keeping a much closer eye on the Dukes Of Hazzard role playing.

....Although, I also have a happy story -

One of my cousins is a fantastic musician, so we weren't surprised when he got up onstage with the band at my brother's wedding. But before they started playing, he said he had to explain his choice of song - and talked about how he and my brother would often go motocross biking on the track the kids in his neighborhood set up, both of them taking turns who would be Bo and who would be Luke. And with that, he began some familiar finger picking on his guitar, and the rest of the band swung in behind him as my cousin started singing, "Just the good ol' boys....never meanin' no harm...." And he sang his way through the entire theme, and on into an extra few lines he'd written for the occasion:

"Just the good ol' boys, ridin' on their dirt bikes....when we shot off cherry bombs, our dads didn't get TOO mad...."
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:19 PM on January 14, 2015 [7 favorites]


When the sheriff's dept. showed up at our Senior Class Picnic - held in the mountains - to check for underage drinking there was of course a mass exodus into the forest. One kid slowed down just enough to yell over his shoulder, "The mountains may get me but the law never will!" . . .and then promptly ran into a pine tree.

To the delight of all present the deputy who got to him first said quite loudly that the kid was clearly not a duke of hazzard but a DUD of hazzard.

To say he's never lived it down is an understatement.
posted by barchan at 8:31 PM on January 14, 2015 [22 favorites]


Something I learned from Dynamite! magazine: the show went through several General Lees in each episode. Every time we saw Bo and Luke jumping the car over some obstacle, in the real world it ended in automotive destruction. That's why you never saw them jump and land in the same shot.

They filmed the Dukes in my hometown, in Placerita Canyon in what is now Santa Clarita, CA. I don't quite remember it, but my dad remembers when the gas station on the corner of Sierra Hwy and San Fernando Road would have something like 8 General Lee's parked out front.

You actually can see the cars get destroyed on the show sometimes. They did a jump at a racetrack (in reality, Saugus Speedway RIP) and when the car lands, you can see the frame bend something like 20 degrees right behind the front wheels. In real life that would have super ruined the car, but of course the next shot showed it taking off around the track or something.
posted by sideshow at 8:34 PM on January 14, 2015 [4 favorites]


I never forget how the opening credits, they'd shot dynamite arrows. That's a level of foolhardy that's become quite subversive to my mind in the modern age we live in now. These days I'm sure there'd be a standoff with ATF where Roscoe would have a tank paid for with Homeland Security money.
posted by Catblack at 8:37 PM on January 14, 2015 [5 favorites]


My brother-in-law has an unhealthy fixation with the General Lee. He had a rat-rod of a Charger which wouldn't drive straight for anything but, with a fresh set of plugs and points, would lay a 50-foot posi scratch. This was supposed to be the donor car for the rotisserie shell of a Charger that sat dormant in the garage for a number of years.

Lot of fun, but the traitor flag and "Dixie" horn make me cringe any more.
posted by notsnot at 8:38 PM on January 14, 2015




[freeze frame] About this time, them good old Duke boys were in a heap of a metaphysical crisis. [commercial break]
posted by detachd at 8:44 PM on January 14, 2015 [15 favorites]


Their infamous 1969 Dodge Charger, the General Lee, is as familiar to the average American 20-year old as a Coke can or the Nike Swoosh symbol.

Citation needed.
posted by graphnerd at 8:45 PM on January 14, 2015 [6 favorites]


The spirit of the General Lee lives on... in the destruction of a perfectly good 45,000 dollar pickup.

I loved me the Dukes when I was a kid. Having moved from the deep south to MN in 78, they made me feel like it was ok to talk with a drawl. That and every Burt Reynolds movie at the time embedded in me a deep love of fast cars and brunettes at a time when I was just discovering sexuality.

And yeah, sliding across the hood of the car was both awesome and a guaranteed ass chewing. Worth it though.
posted by Pogo_Fuzzybutt at 8:49 PM on January 14, 2015 [1 favorite]


Ben Jones was my Congressman for a while. Good times. Georgia politics has changed quite a lot since then.
posted by thelonius at 8:59 PM on January 14, 2015


I always wanted the back story of the Sheriff Little of Chickasaw county. What's his day like, that sort of thing.
posted by Renoroc at 9:03 PM on January 14, 2015 [4 favorites]


There is an odd coincidence between the 0 on the General Lee and the O in the Hollywood sign, and it may not be a coincidence at all (self link):

“[T]he first promotional photos of the General Lee in 1978 took place in Griffith Park. At this time, the General Lee did not have the ‘01’ on its doors yet (because no one had thought of it yet). The Hollywood Sign can be clearly seen from Griffith Park. Plus it was 1978, the year they rebuilt the Hollywood Sign with celebrity donations and much fanfare (which also coincided with Hollywood’s 75th anniversary), so a lot of public attention was on the sign at that time. This makes me think that whoever designed the General Lee’s ‘01’ copied it from the Hollywood Sign.”
posted by maxsparber at 9:05 PM on January 14, 2015 [2 favorites]


LOL I remember in about '85 going to a Mopar parts dealer in LA and he tried to talk me out of fixing up my 65 Cuda (I wish I had listened to him) and instead I should buy this lovely 69 Charger R/T 440, only 80k miles, beautiful condition, he couldn't give it away at $2000. I told him, it probably wasn't selling because of the ugly brown paint job. But hey let's check Hemmings and see what that car would be worth today. OMG here is a 69 Charger R/T with the same ugly brown paint, award winning restoration, asking price $86k. It could even be the very same car I saw.
posted by charlie don't surf at 9:20 PM on January 14, 2015 [1 favorite]


I always wanted the back story of the Sheriff Little of Chickasaw county. What's his day like, that sort of thing.

0700 - Review overnight logs, check out patrol car, inspect it for safety.
0730 - Take up position on Main St. for traffic safety compliance
0900 - 911 reports online harassment. Go to victim's residence, take statement. Sore as heck ex beau giving her the business.
0930 - Give that man a talking to he won't forget. Mark it on the rap sheet - one more step out of bounds, and he's in the cells.
1030 - Warned him. Booked and processed, just like that. Prep case notes for prosecutor's office.
1130 - Work with the victim and judge on restraining order in case he makes bail. I got two deputies lined up if we need 'em.
1230 - Lunch. Cold pork roast on rye, leftovers from what I cooked for the family last night.
1300 - Pick up community policing business cards, they have my cell number on them right this time. Put a dozen or so in the fancy business card case my husband got me for Christmas.
1400 - Take up position on old dirt road near swamp just by Hazzard county for traffic safety compliance.
posted by Slap*Happy at 9:25 PM on January 14, 2015 [14 favorites]


I never forget how the opening credits, they'd shot dynamite arrows.

Had to.
The Duke boys were on probation for running moonshine, so they weren't allowed to have guns.
posted by madajb at 9:30 PM on January 14, 2015 [8 favorites]


So, the show came out in '79; that means that the '69 Charger was only 10 years old then.
posted by 445supermag at 9:36 PM on January 14, 2015 [1 favorite]


graphnerd: “Their infamous 1969 Dodge Charger, the General Lee, is as familiar to the average American 20-year old as a Coke can or the Nike Swoosh symbol.

Citation needed.”
Given the dates on the works in the bibliography, one presumes this would have been true when this paper was written 20 years ago.
posted by ob1quixote at 10:23 PM on January 14, 2015 [2 favorites]


Which, I hasten to add, doesn't mean I don't appreciate this post. I'd never seen this paper. I'm very curious about the conclusions.
posted by ob1quixote at 10:26 PM on January 14, 2015


When I was a wee tyke I apparently knew DUKES as "the car fall down show". That's still how I think of it.
posted by brundlefly at 11:52 PM on January 14, 2015 [3 favorites]


We loved this show at the time in England too. To us the cars might as well have been from another planet. And the sunshine.
posted by colie at 12:17 AM on January 15, 2015 [4 favorites]


Are we going to leave unspoken the effect of Daisy?

I think it says just what my vintage is, but my pre-adolescence and looming interest in romantic relationships was marked by Daisy, by Debby Harry on the Muppet Show, and the sound of Chrissy Hynde's voice.
posted by C.A.S. at 1:44 AM on January 15, 2015 [4 favorites]


My fave bit of Hazzard trivia... James 'Rosco P. Coltrane' Best founded an acting school that at one point taught Quentin Tarantino
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 2:01 AM on January 15, 2015 [5 favorites]


Quentin Tarantino is a walking PSA against cocaine use
posted by C.A.S. at 2:24 AM on January 15, 2015


A supercut that seems relevant: Every General Lee jump from seasons 1-6
posted by jonathanbell at 2:49 AM on January 15, 2015 [4 favorites]


Awesome fun fact - James Best (who played Sheriff Roscoe Peeeeeeeeee. Coltrane) was an active gamer back in the day. He used to play Rainbow Six multiplayer and was a pretty cool guy.
posted by longbaugh at 3:12 AM on January 15, 2015 [5 favorites]


These days I'm sure there'd be a standoff with ATF where Roscoe would have a tank paid for with Homeland Security money.

"Modern Dukes" is probably a twitter account that would do well much as the "Modern Seinfeld" one does.
posted by josher71 at 4:49 AM on January 15, 2015


That supercut of jumps is great. Not only did the cars get trashed on landing every time, but a very large percentage of the jumps appear to go completely wrong from the start - not getting enough distance usually - and yet they just stuck them in the show anyway and the banjo music does the rest.
posted by colie at 4:57 AM on January 15, 2015 [4 favorites]


Even to an English schoolboy, Hazzard County looked an awful lot like Walnut Grove from Little House on the Prairie

They filmed the Dukes in my hometown, in Placerita Canyon in what is now Santa Clarita, CA.

Apparently Little House on the Prairie was shot in Simi Valley. If someone were to plot on a map where U.S. television series with exterior scenes had been shot, you'd have a big cluster of dots on California.
posted by gimonca at 5:32 AM on January 15, 2015


The angle on some of those landings is so steep just before they cut away... I can only assume that there's a pile of cut footage of landings out there somewhere with the car nosediving into the dirt again and again.
posted by Leon at 5:47 AM on January 15, 2015


The reason the Dukes weren't allowed in his county is that they were a public menace, and they were.

The Duke boys were on probation for running moonshine, so they weren't allowed to have guns


Even as a kid I found this so strange, that there was a law saying "You can't have guns because you have proven to be a danger" but no one batted an eye at them buying dynamite in bulk.
posted by yerfatma at 6:45 AM on January 15, 2015


no one batted an eye at them buying dynamite in bulk.

Stumps. Lotta stumps out there on the Duke land.
posted by Etrigan at 6:54 AM on January 15, 2015


Ha,

My sister and I loved Dukes of Hazzard when we were really young. I had absolutely no idea of the context or cultural references, or what the American South was. I was just a little Canadian girl. What mattered was the car (oh gosh they got in it through the window!!!) car chases, the silly police and just to my mind general silliness. To me it was more like a live action cartoon.

My parents were not happy with the show. I remember them, especially my Mom not wanting me to watch it so I don't think I watched it as much as I remember that I did. I did buy a model of the General Lee with my allowance. I remember going to the store and getting it and my Dad asking me several times if I was really sure that I wanted it. I never made it though. It's embarrassing to admit it not but John was one of my first girl crushes. (Gah that makes me squirm now) I drove my family crazy listening to some album he made on a cross country road trip. I sat in the back of the van and listen to it over, and over and over on my little battery powered cassette deck. My Dad eventually took the tape away from me. Ah the memories.

It wasn't until I was older that realized why my parents weren't so happy about the show. I've seen it a few times since I was young and spent most of the time laughing at how much kid me just didn't understand.

Oh and someone at my brother in laws work end up buying my dust covered General Lee model kit for 50 bucks so yay Dukes of Hazzard!
posted by Jalliah at 6:58 AM on January 15, 2015 [1 favorite]


My favorite General Lee spotted in the wild was a Smart Car sitting in a line of cars out in the countryside, where people kind of sell used cars on the side and just park them in their yard. Apparently, it's a thing.
posted by Atreides at 7:14 AM on January 15, 2015 [3 favorites]


You say "working class" but the only one of them you ever see with any sort of job is Daisy.
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 7:15 AM on January 15, 2015 [3 favorites]


Dirt Cheap Rat Rod! 1968 Charger Buildup and Thrash - Roadkill Ep. 23

I haven't watched this in a long time and I don't remember if they mention Dukes. They didn't need to mention Dukes.
posted by bukvich at 7:17 AM on January 15, 2015 [1 favorite]


James Best (who played Sheriff Roscoe Peeeeeeeeee. Coltrane)

When I was a kid I always heard this as "Roscoe Pekoe Train".
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 7:18 AM on January 15, 2015 [7 favorites]


He never used the long Peeeeeeeeeee over teamspeak unless you asked him nicely.
posted by longbaugh at 7:44 AM on January 15, 2015 [1 favorite]


Metafilter: Something I learned from Dynamite! magazine.
posted by Chrysostom at 7:45 AM on January 15, 2015 [3 favorites]


When I was a kid I always heard this as "Roscoe Pekoe Train

I heard it this way till today. Right to when I read this thread and went, "Huh, well I'll be...."
posted by Jalliah at 7:54 AM on January 15, 2015 [2 favorites]


Someone one in one of the sleepy Northern California towns I lived in had a classic Beetle painted up like the General Lee, except instead of "01" on the door, it read "1/2."

The 10 year old in me really misses the sound of cars with carburetors.
posted by entropicamericana at 8:07 AM on January 15, 2015




As a wee young'un, my favorite toy was a Matchbox General Lee. I called it the Time Machine and in my mind it had all of the powers of the Back to the Future Delorean (more the ability to fly and leave two burning streaks in its wake than the actual power of time travel). I'm not sure why I associated the cars together in my head (it's not like I confused them, I knew full well it was a different car in Back to the Future), but I think it was because those were the two cars I knew of that flew.
posted by ckape at 10:06 AM on January 15, 2015


i think it was because those were the two cars I knew of that flew.

"What... is the air-speed velocity of an unladen 1969 Dodge Charger?"
posted by entropicamericana at 10:31 AM on January 15, 2015


Their infamous 1969 Dodge Charger, the General Lee, is as familiar to the average American 20-year old as a Coke can or the Nike Swoosh symbol.

Citation needed.


It goes waaaay back.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 12:05 PM on January 15, 2015 [2 favorites]


Aw, it ain't no Dodge Challenger.
posted by maxsparber at 1:22 PM on January 15, 2015


These are my Dukes of Hazzard thoughts:
1. There's a terrible Dukes of Hazzard "soundtrack" album that, while mostly garbage (I love James Best, but were you dying to hear him sing? You were not), contains a shockingly good Johnny Cash song sung from the point of view of the General Lee. Looks like Spotify has it.

2. Does anybody remember the mid-90s TV movie revival that included Boss Hogg's sexxxy lady successor giving Roscoe a just-offscreen handjob? I only wish I was making that up.

3. If I ever get to the point that money isn't an object, and there are still '69 Dodge Chargers available, I'm doing this.
posted by the phlegmatic king at 1:33 PM on January 15, 2015


I had a friend who had a Le Car. We called it the General Le Car and jumped in and out through its windows.

Weirdly, I never really watched the show, although I did watch Enos.
posted by maxsparber at 1:40 PM on January 15, 2015


My mother had very black and white ideas about what made appropriate prime-time tv viewing for children. The Muppet Show, yes. The Mandrell Sisters, yes. Masterpiece Theatre, watched in bits from behind the couch where you were playing Barbie, yes. Dukes of Hazard, no no no.

My 2 cousins, on the other hand, were obsessed. In the summer, they came to stay at my grandparents' house next door, so we played together a lot. No matter what game we played my cousin Charlie had to be named Bo. I remember a lot of negotiation over the existence of Bo Solo, Han's brother. Childhood was exhausting that way.
posted by Biblio at 3:20 PM on January 15, 2015


Santa Claus brought me this super cool toy one year. I loved it, even though I didn't see the show until a couple of years later. Guy in the video obviously didn't dig the ability to make the car go on its side by being propped up on two wheels. Noob.
posted by Elmore at 3:26 PM on January 15, 2015


Hey, I just remembered - Mythbusters tested a Dukes-related car jump once.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 4:21 PM on January 15, 2015 [1 favorite]


I remember Sheriff Little! I loved him. Namely because I hated Bo and Luke. As a kid they reminded me of the teenagers who engaged in all kinds of gleeful acts of mid-level destruction in my neighborhood and were worshipped for it. OK maybe I was a little bit jealous.

But Flash. Poor Flash. That poor dog was forced to ride along with this bumbling, maniacal cop, probably dreading every time he is dragged into the squad car, knowing damn well that his day will not entail just letting his head hang out the window as the winds of Hazzard County flap his jowls lovingly, his solemn brown eyes trembling in fear at the words HOT PURSUIT FLASH and probably pissing with terror as Roscoe raced dangerously around unpaved hairpin turns chasing the Dukes. If he could speak he would probably say "ROSCOE MAN DO YOU KNOW WHAT AN ARREST WARRANT IS jesus just go to Uncle Jesse's and book them what are we doing I could be sleeping on the porch right now."
posted by Aya Hirano on the Astral Plane at 7:53 PM on January 15, 2015 [2 favorites]


pinch-hit replacement for a midseason flop

I had to find out what this might have been. The sked flips around quite a bit but the best candidate seems to be Flying High (air stewardess, er, flight attendant comedy-drama with a 23-year-old Connie Sellecca). Sample unaired episode plot: Pam goes out on a date with an art teacher. Captain March has to abstain from womanizing for an entire weekend if he wants to get a date with Lisa. Whew.

Anyway, I've seen Moonrunners, for some reason, and it's about what you'd expect from a movie that was redeveloped into the series, complete with cousins, an Uncle Jesse, ludicrous pile-ups, and ... yes, dynamite arrows.

More trivia -- Tom Wopat is from, of all places, Lodi, Wisconsin. (It's a Czech name and apparently this state has the highest US concentration of them -- I even know one.) Because he went to UW-Madison, and later had success on Broadway, the local (I think I have to say it this way) thee-AY-ter awards for high school musicals are called the "Tommies". I'm not kidding. Hood-sliding is not, to my knowledge, one of the categories. The first one, apparently, was actually a mistake, but they used the footage anyway, and it became Luke's trademark.

Citation needed.

There was definitely a time when hearing a "Dixie" car horn was a frequent enough thing that it ceased to have, shall we say, the joy of the novel.
posted by dhartung at 11:45 PM on January 15, 2015 [3 favorites]


I like to think that The Dukes Of Hazzard did the world a great service by ridding the streets of dozens of wretched Dodge Chargers, on top of giving particularly tasteful gay adolescents the toothsome presence of Tom Wopat to enliven regular stroke sessions.
posted by sonascope at 6:16 AM on January 16, 2015


I like to think that The Dukes Of Hazzard did the world a great service by ridding the streets of dozens of wretched Dodge Chargers

Dukes was just a low budget version of Smokey and the Bandit. People loved redneckmobiles like the Trash Trans Am. Too bad more TAs weren't trashed. I personally would go more for the Firebird.
posted by charlie don't surf at 1:35 PM on January 17, 2015


If he could speak he would probably say

HOW VERY DARE YOU flash was a lady dog
posted by poffin boffin at 1:55 PM on January 17, 2015 [1 favorite]


This thread has taught me more about the Dukes of Hazzard than I thought I'd ever know.

And that's a sentence I didn't see myself writing anytime soon.
posted by Aya Hirano on the Astral Plane at 12:39 AM on January 19, 2015


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